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Clam cleats are super annoying. They make it difficult to do a release of the sheet, and will automatically recleat your lazy sheet while you trim the working sheet.

Cam cleats or a simple horn cleat with a jam on one side will be a lot easier to deal with.
 

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I don't know that I've seen one of those before, or if I have I didn't notice it.

How do you use it? How is it different than a regular horn cleat?
You don't have to do a figure 8 to get it to hold. You can just wrap it around and it will hold well enough in normal conditions. It isn't strong enough for long term conditions or high loads (like a docking line or halyard would see).

If your sheets and cleats are sized appropriately you can also jam the sheet into the cleat, this design just makes it easier and less critical of sheet line size.
 

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I used the open type clam cleat for racing and cruising for many years and always liked them. Be sure they are sized right for your sheets, and they have a fair lead from the winch. They are fast and easy to use.
 

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I don't know that I've seen one of those before, or if I have I didn't notice it.

How do you use it? How is it different than a regular horn cleat?
You don't have those on your C22? I thought they were standard equipment, but I didn't really think about it that hard.

That's what I have. I run the sheet through the middle of the legs, then you only have to to go once around to get it to hold (unless it's really fierce weather, then you can do a cleat hitch).

They're ok. They're not as fast or as quickly adjustable as a cam cleat, but they're way, way less annoying than a clam cleat.

 

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I leave my sheets in the self tailing winches these days... however previous boat used a horn cleat. I think horn cleats are the most common on mid to larger sized boats from what I've seen.

I'm not a huge fan of clam cleats. I like cam cleats but you usually see them on smaller boats when used on a jib sheet. We use the Harken 150's on Ensign 22s, and they should be a good fit on your O'Day as well. They're not too expensive and can be rebuilt (new springs) in the future. I would just use the cleat, no fairleads needed.
 

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I've used all three types. My Hunter 23.5 came with some horn cleats for the jib sheets. I added cam cleats and much prefer them. They make quick trim adjustments a snap for a solo sailor. Clam cleats, (at least the plastic ones) seem to wear out pretty fast and then won't hold worth a darn, I'm not a fan of them.

Kevin
 

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That's what I have. I run the sheet through the middle of the legs, then you only have to to go once around to get it to hold (unless it's really fierce weather, then you can do a cleat hitch).
Running the sheets 'through' the cleat base is the same as running them through any kind of fairlead and is just asking for a twist in the running line to get jammed in there.. Good you've gotten away with it but I wouldn't do that on a boat with a large genoa and a lot of sheet to run.
 

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+1 to Faster's comment above.

Also, to clear things up, the cam cleat, horn cleat, or self tailer should not have a large load on it. Ever. The load should be on the winch with enough wraps that very little should be at the cleat, no matter what style you're using.
 

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The winches and jib sheet cleats on my 21-footer are on the coach roof. I replaced the worn-out clam-cleats on the edge of the coach roof with Harken 150's and will never go back to clam cleats. If your sheet cleats are on a flush part of the deck, like in the picture above, jam cleats may be more ergonomic. Personally I prefer the jam cleats where the deck forms one half of the V and the cleat the other. They hold really well, although they should not have to hold a lot if the sheet comes off a winch as pointed out by zz4gta, but I haven't seen these in the US yet.
 

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Here's where mine are:



Think I may go with those Harken 150's. Should they be on an angle to line up with the line coming off the winch?
Even those clam cleats would work better at an angle.. cams would be better, and yes, angled would work better.

Here's another option.. makes 'sitting' on the coaming more comfortable but some don't like the 'poke in the back' sitting on the seat. Better lead angle and easier release, though..

 

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I think you'll love the 150's. And yes, they should be on the line between the winch and the preferred position of the person adjusting the sheets, mounted close to the edge of the cockpit, such that you pull the sheet "square" through the cleat. As zz4gta also suggest, I would not install a fairlead. You can add one later if you feel you want that.

Here's where mine are:



Think I may go with those Harken 150's. Should they be on an angle to line up with the line coming off the winch?
 

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I love my alloy clam cleats. My old boat came with horn cleats and I hated them, they often prevented me from making small adjustments to the jib that I do all the time with clam cleats.

I don't know how long they will last - I would suspect many years - but what are they to replace? 12 bucks? 15?
 
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I love my alloy clam cleats. My old boat came with horn cleats and I hated them, they often prevented me from making small adjustments to the jib that I do all the time with clam cleats.

I don't know how long they will last - I would suspect many years - but what are they to replace? 12 bucks? 15?
Around $30 new. 10-15$ for a rebuild kit.
 
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