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islander bahama 24
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Or build a base like a couple pieces of plywood about a foot sq with hole in middle fro stove to sit in to stabilize it YMMV the important thing is to make sure it is stable and won't fall over when lit
 

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Corsair 24
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look up james baldwin gimballed mountaineering kerosene stove

its about the best solution to this question

while not propane its kerosene and does very well

fwiw I cruised on my boat on a gimballed stainless 1 potter using mostly coleman propane and or torch propane bottles found all over the world in hardware stores

very $$ friendly and not as complicated as a full propane system on bigger boats however there is a degree of filth and care needed for the small propane tanks as they RUST and leak every once in a while...

we had to leave them outside always and as you know this causes issues like moistrure and rust etc.

so back to the kerosene gimballed solution you just have one external filler jerry can and prime and pressure as you go


peace
 
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Bombay Explorer 44
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I might consider finding a space for it and adding some 1/2 sq battens to act as fiddles just in case somebody wakes you.

For the same reason wire fiddles to retain the pot are a good idea. A couple of wire coat hangers are a good start.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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All the backpacker stoves are easily knocked over, especially when loaded with a fry pan and contents ... especially prone to falling over on a boat that can 'rock'.

A better choice would be a flat table-top Butane stove - IMO
Amazon.com : Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case : Indoor Camp Stove : Sports & Outdoors
ever read some of the horror stories with those butane stoves? I know they are supposed to back the cylinder out when they get too hot, but in many of the cases I have read, they don't and makes a huge fireball when the cylinder explodes.
 

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John,
I've used Optimus & MSR stoves while mountaineering. While Optimus has a little more stability, I would not suggest either. The cartrige stoves have a high center of gravity & will tip over if a large pot/skillet is off center. The external white gas models require priming & the fuel spills easily out of the cup; I almost had my tent burned up, with me inside, from someone with an MSR next to me on Denali. MAYBE a Coleman portable, but that comes with ventilation worries & a way to secure it.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I bought a Forespar mini-galley a few years ago. Forespar Mini-Galley Hot-SpotAll I can say is that it works marginally in moderate conditions but can send stuff flying if it's rough. Ask me how I know this:) It also is not hot enough if used up on deck to make coffee (why I bought it) if the wind is blowing a bit. I would not want to rely on one of them. You need something well attached whether gimbaled or not.
 

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One of None
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look up james baldwin gimballed mountaineering kerosene stove

its about the best solution to this question

while not propane its kerosene and does very well

fwiw I cruised on my boat on a gimballed stainless 1 potter using mostly coleman propane and or torch propane bottles found all over the world in hardware stores

very $$ friendly and not as complicated as a full propane system on bigger boats however there is a degree of filth and care needed for the small propane tanks as they RUST and leak every once in a while...

we had to leave them outside always and as you know this causes issues like moistrure and rust etc.

so back to the kerosene gimballed solution you just have one external filler jerry can and prime and pressure as you go

peace
Classic! Christian I've seen a few of these over the years
 

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All the backpacker stoves are easily knocked over, especially when loaded with a fry pan and contents ... especially prone to falling over on a boat that can 'rock'.

A better choice would be a flat table-top Butane stove - IMO
Amazon.com : Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case : Indoor Camp Stove : Sports & Outdoors
No not a good recommendation.
Using one of these

I lost an eyebrow gained a scar on my arm. Drew the attention of all the other boats in the anchorage even a passing ferry stopped.

it was leaking and burst into flames on my saloon table.
one of my cushions caught fire as I when I dropped it.

Threw it overboard along with burning cushion.
Survived but would not use a camp stove of any kind inside a boat again.
 

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I've been using a Coleman Power Pack burner on board for two seasons. I partially dismantled the boats original three burner stove and oven and use the gimbeled stainless steel surface to hold it:
THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: RETHINKING PROPANE: Dismantling the Hillerange Seaward Stove Part Four
I've found one burner quite capable for all my cooking though I do have a second burner in storage should I ever feel I absolutely need to have two burners for cooking. So far I've never seen the need for it.
 

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Using an optimus stove on a boat is insane. Use a Forespar or Force 10 gimbaled propane stove. They are basically single burner camp stoves that fasten to a bulkhead with a swinging gimbal. The use the Coleman propane bottles that are available worldwide (and refillable if you are clever and careful). maybe $150.
 

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I think newhaul has it. If you're going to use it, build a gimbal for it and something that firmly supports your pot or pan to it. I've seen homemade gimbal units hung from the ceiling, but that must reduce movement as bumping into it would be bad too.

You should have a fire blanket plus an extinguisher. But know that the moment you pull the trigger on a fire extinguisher, the cabin will instantly go to zero visibility. There is a great video from Yacting Monthly on fire suppression aboard.


In the end, not a great idea, but you might make it work.
 

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Go to a camping store and buy a two burner propane camp stove. It won't dump over and if it does it will only spill your oatmeal and not a highly flammable liquid. It also won't stink when it's going. A normal tube of propane will last for months of small usage. Store it out in the cockpit or somewhere else where it can safely drain if it should leak.
 

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The Optimus Hiker+ is the best choice of their stoves given that it's square base might be more stable. But I wouldn't recommend any white Gas stove for use on a boat. We hiked the AT for years and carried an Optimus Svea. It was always somewhat temperamental but produced good, fast heat, until the day it went up in a fireball. Scary given the fuel tank is onboard. Unlike Uricanejack, we were lucky and no one was hurt. Then switched to MSR Fireflies and Whisperlites with external tanks.

You have a very small space to work with on your 16 footer. Do you really have any space in the cuddy to install a gimballed stove or are you limited to using something on deck? A flat base propane camp stove might be your best bet, but find a way to gimbal the pot and have your fire extinguisher accessible.
 

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The chef here cooks on a tiny charcoal grill. Works great. Outside on the transom of course. Not so good for a quick cup of coffee, certainly. But works great. Cheap ($4) and simple. No gimbals.

If the OP has a monohull, and is actually sailing, he gotta have gimbals, right? Even in an anchorage gimbals can save the day. (Cats should to as I have seen hot stuff go flying when real sailing is being done.)
 
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