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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have passed this boat on my way to work for 4 years I finally stopped to check it out. I am going to approach the owner about giving her up and what it will take. I would like to get some info about her first. Any help would be great.

Thanks

Gary


 

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NOt positive, but it looks to be in the line of a hobie 27 or Santa cruz 27. That era of ULDB smaller boats from the late 70's/early 80's. Very fast boats for there size.

Another, might be one of the last moore 24's with a cabin, but looks bigger than a moore

Marty
 

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If you can get the HIN off the boat's transom, you can probably look up what kind of boat it is.
 

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I was just getting to an Olson............was thinking 25, then saw post by t22, would concur that is is a 29 or some offspring of an olson. too many similar markings from all of the models.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was just getting to an Olson............was thinking 25, then saw post by t22, would concur that is is a 29 or some offspring of an olson. too many similar markings from all of the models.

Marty
Are these good boats? It looks fast as all get out.

Are the sails and rigging easily available. I looked at the hull and it is in great shape. No impact damage and very solid. The mast looks good but the rigging is a loss.
 

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There are a few Olson 29 threads on Sailing Anarchy that you should read (do a search). Assuming this one's in good shape, this would probably be a great boat for someone looking for a very fast, relatively cheap 30' race boat for PHRF. They are not only fast, but very seaworthy in the sense that people have raced them shorthanded to Hawaii and Bermuda. It's a lot of boat and if you're not already a good sailor you may find yourself in over your head. You will probably need a lot of crew (6-8?) to sail to your rating for normal windward/leewards. Olson 30's in good shape go for around $15k. The few 29's I've seen listed seem to go for more. They only made a few dozen of them and they are popular.
 

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There are some 30's here in the seattle area. Now that I realize the hull for the 29 and 30 are the same, why I recognized the shape. There is a 30 at Shilshoal that is for sale, with a trailer, looks real similar. It is in the dry sail area with Moore 24's, a hobie or two, and at least to other O30's........

I personally do not know much about them, other than the 30s are PRF rated in the upper 90s, I looked it up earlier, but have forgotten the actual number, but 98 is ringing a bell.

The 30 for sale is "Aliens ate my Buick" It might be listed in the O30 class for sale adds. I recall it being private in nature for sale.

It would be a fast boat in the line of Santa cruz's etc. Probably one of the earlier design ULDB style of boat.

My Jeanneau 30 as a comparison has PHRF of 188 base here in the NW, ave thru out the US is 165. Quite a bit faster than me, I'm faster than the typical 30 cruiser/racer to cruiser ie a Cat30 as an example.

marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are a few Olson 29 threads on Sailing Anarchy that you should read (do a search). Assuming this one's in good shape, this would probably be a great boat for someone looking for a very fast, relatively cheap 30' race boat for PHRF. They are not only fast, but very seaworthy in the sense that people have raced them shorthanded to Hawaii and Bermuda. It's a lot of boat and if you're not already a good sailor you may find yourself in over your head. You will probably need a lot of crew (6-8?) to sail to your rating for normal windward/leewards. Olson 30's in good shape go for around $15k. The few 29's I've seen listed seem to go for more. They only made a few dozen of them and they are popular.
This would be my first big boat. Sounds like it would be a bit much for me to sail as I am looking for something I can single hand. I think I am going to try and get it and maybe use it to trade for a boat more suited for a first timer. I feel like learning more about this boat it is a shame to let it sit there in a field and rot. It is still in relatively good shape but that won't last if it stays were it is. I am in Chicago and there are many resources here to take advantage of a boat like this. I will update if I am able to get her.

Thanks for your guys input.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I know the Olsen 29 pretty well. They were an updated version of the Olsen 30 with a fractional rig and a few more amenities down below. Olsen was an extremely high quality builder of early ULDB's (Ultra Light Displacement Boat) and the 29 was typical of this high build quality standard.

In terms of sailing ability, these first generation ULDB's were very fast down wind and at broad reaching angles but were not great boats in a general sense. They were extremely narrow hoping to be able to plane or at least operate in a low wave making semi-displacement mode. The result was a boat that was quite tender and a real handful in a breeze. That said, they could get by with smaller headsails (110's) for day sailing and so would not completely be out of the question as a daysailer, overnighter.

The short coming of all ULDB's of that era is that they were completely intollerant of any extra weight on board. Like a high performance multihull, some of thier safety came from being able to use the force of a gust to accellerate rather than heel. Extra weight or a dirty bottom took that advantage away. That said, these boats were raced with very big crews 6-8 people (perhaps as much as 1800 lbs) and the boat tolerated that weight (of course the weight would all be placed on the windward rail in any kind of strong wind).

Oh yeah, one more point...Olsen 30's have a strong one design class and so have held their value surprisingly well. The Olsen 29's are something of an orphan and so are substantially less valuable, even though they cost a lot more when new.

Jeff
 

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Good catch. that looks more like an Olson 30 keel. The mast looks like its fractional like a O-29 and the transom is definitely a 29. You just have to wonder what the story is....
 

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Rudders are easier to change than the rigging or transom. :) Could be that the rudder was replaced due to delamination or water entry...
Good catch. that looks more like an Olson 30 keel. The mast looks like its fractional like a O-29 and the transom is definitely a 29. You just have to wonder what the story is....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's an Olson 29 keel. The trailing edge is (mostly) hidden behind the trailer pad support.
Correct on the Keel. When up close and looking at it the trailing edge is not straight. The sad end to the story is that I stopped by to talk to the owner about if it was available. The man was older and a bit of a curmudgeon. When I asked him about the boat he just shook his head and closed the door on me without saying a word. Since the boat has been sitting out there for 7 years it seems it is destined to rot next to that barn. Very sad state for such a nice boat. It is a shame she will most likely not ever see the water again.
 

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I got so excited when I started reading this thread, I've been searching for an Olson 29/30 in the Great lakes area for a while now......if you don't mind me asking, could you tell me where its located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Good luck to you. I stopped by and the guy wouldn't even talk about it. Maybe a fist full of 100's would help. The boat is on the north side of the barn in the middle of the map. It is parker road in the lockport area of south suburban chicago. The link should take you to a google map. (cut and paste it if you have to)

parker rd lockport illinois - Google Maps
 
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