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is 1/2" chain too heavy to hoist up by hand? i'm 25 6'2" and 180 lb

  • yes

    Votes: 12 52.2%
  • no

    Votes: 11 47.8%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am on someone else mooring in Miami Florida. They showed up and want it back! So I am looking to get a new anchor and some heavy chain for my 33 foot wooden sloop. It is pretty light, not sure exactly, but it has an old concrete keel, and is low in the water 6' draft. I am thinking of putting a 35-55 pound danfrth or plow on 3/8-1/2" chain followed by a 50 pound gym weight up on the chain. Right now a guy is willing to sell me 60 feet of 1/2" chain for $60 which is the best deal I've found. That is preferable to me than using 3/8 as even though everyone says thats fine it isn't heavy enough to make me feel safe. But will I be able to hoist up 1/2 inch chain myself without a winch? I could possibly get a winch, but I don't really have a good place on the prow to install it.
 

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Do you work out? 1/2 chain is pretty large.. how big/heavy is your boat?

That chain plus your anchor will be a handful unless you never anchor in more than 10 feet of water. Theoretically you'll only be lifting as much chain as the distance from the bottom to your bow roller.. so, like so many other things with boating, 'it depends'.

How deep?
How strong are you? - but even if you can grunt it up, this can get ugly if it gets away on you...
 

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Ugh...anchor discussions always turn sour but I'll give it a try.

The bottom line is- You should be able to hoist 60 feet of 1/2" chain. That's all I'm going to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm currently anchored semi long term in about 10 feet of water. XD so yeah, i feel like I could easily lift 10 feet of chain onto the deck at a time. In the state of my boat at the moment I am not even thinking of going to sea, or even leaving 30 foot waters for that matter at least for a good 3-6 months. I need something with longer term holding power. that i can leave my boat anchored at and feel safe.
 

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Barquito
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Seems to me the design and weight of the anchor would have more of an impact on holding than the difference between 3/8" and 1/2" anchor chain. 60 ft of 1/2" would be something like 165 lb, and 60 ft of 3/8" would be something like 84 lb. If weight is a problem, get the heavier anchor, and lighter chain. If this is going to be a long term mooring, go really heavy on the anchor.
 

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10' yes but it gets old really quick, do it more than a few times and you will be looking for a way to make it easier. As others have said choose the right anchor and if it long term leave the anchor on a ball.
Personally I dislike danforth anchors, maybe ok in sand but I have dragged a few times with one in other bottom conditions, used a Plow for many years not perfect but good. Just purchased a Rocna so hope it lives up to the manufactures claims.
 

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Raising anchor gets a lot harder when the wind picks up and you have to overcome the force of that wind acting on your boat. Or when the anchor gets stuck on the bottom. And if you are by yourself at such times, things can get very tricky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Seems to me the design and weight of the anchor would have more of an impact on holding than the difference between 3/8" and 1/2" anchor chain. 60 ft of 1/2" would be something like 165 lb, and 60 ft of 3/8" would be something like 84 lb. If weight is a problem, get the heavier anchor, and lighter chain. If this is going to be a long term mooring, go really heavy on the anchor.
everyone out here swears it's the chain and not the anchor that keeps you grounded. I know, seems weird to me too. I mean it's not like they say not to even use an anchor, some people have been here for years on 80 feet of heavy chain and a 50 lb anchor. I want about 80 lbs on my anchor, but well see if I can get it. They can be pretty expensive for a hunk of metal.
 

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If your boat is not seaworthy it may well be better to put her up on the hard where you can do work properly lots of old wooden boats sink every year creating navigation hazards. Then get a chain anchor that will suit the long term use of the boat. Don't just keep your boat out in an anchorage because it is free. Anchors are not designed for long term storage of a boat storms, tides and currents can make them constantly reset and you can easily drift into another boat or the shore. Moorings are designed (especially proper iron mushroom anchors) for long term storage, and will stay put no matter how many times the boat drifts around it. Moorings are designed to be pulled from any angle, where anchors are not. Proper tool for the proper job. For long term storage I doubt it matters what size chain you use, sure the old timers say it is chain but they are also often the boats that sink. My suggestion is get a proper mooring, rent a slip or have the boat hulled out. Not likely what you want to hear though and if you don't I hope for the boats around you that your insurance is paid and up date.
 

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1/2-inch galvanized chain tips the scales at nearly 2.7-pounds per foot - that's pretty damned heavy when you add the weight of a 45-pound anchor to the end of it. This is compounded by 20 to 50 pounds of mud, windy, nasty weather, etc...

I have a 33-foot Morgan Out Island, I use 1/4-inch bbb galvanized chain, a 45 pound plow anchor and never have any problem holding the boat on most bottoms. A few years ago, that chain began getting heavier, or I got older, so I added an electric windlass - best thing I ever did when it comes to anchoring.

Good luck, young man,

Gary :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)

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well I see a lot of them priced at around 1000 dollars used. And that's what my boat cost including an outboard motor. what could I expect to reasonably pay for a 50-100 lb?
for example

Fortress FX-125 Anchor

Fortress FX 125 Anchor Like Brand New no pitting, w/ bag yacht boat
Those are great secondary anchors, but not what I would want to leave my boat hooked up to. they are known for not resetting if they drag. I would look at the new generation of anchors, hold way better than the heavy older style. Say a Manson Supreme or something like that.

http://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?path=-1|2276108|2276109|2276117&id=901954

this would be more than big enough, but you really should be putting in a mooring, if in only 10 foot of water perhaps one of the screw down type like the Helix but that will entail making sure you have the correct permits. But a wood boat is likely going to need to come out of the water to really do work on the hull. And all wooden boats need work done on the hull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Those are great secondary anchors, but not what I would want to leave my boat hooked up to. they are known for not resetting if they drag. I would look at the new generation of anchors, hold way better than the heavy older style. Say a Manson Supreme or something like that.

Manson Supreme Anchor - 45 Lbs

this would be more than big enough, but you really should be putting in a mooring, if in only 10 foot of water perhaps one of the screw down type like the Helix but that will entail making sure you have the correct permits. But a wood boat is likely going to need to come out of the water to really do work on the hull. And all wooden boats need work done on the hull.
problem is I'm living on it right now :p but I've heard of a boatyard in fort pierce that will put her on the hard and let me live on here there while I work for 150 haul up + 150 bucks a month rent. Might do that at some point. in the spirit of the carribean i might find an island where work can be done and put her up on a beach while camping under some palm trees nearby XD
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'd take it to Fort Pierce that way you can get the help you need. The water is cold in the Beaches on that other shore!...Dale
unfortunately the motor is underwater. it fell in during a storm. I am still diving for it. two stroke so if recovered it might be ok. But the inboard is totally stuck, and i wouldn't trust the current rigging or stepping under sail. unfortunately she is somewhat stuck with no propulsion I'm casually looking for another more powerful outboard, but towing is way too expensive.
 

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unfortunately the motor is underwater. it fell in during a storm. I am still diving for it. two stroke so if recovered it might be ok. But the inboard is totally stuck, and i wouldn't trust the current rigging or stepping under sail. unfortunately she is somewhat stuck with no propulsion I'm casually looking for another more powerful outboard, but towing is way too expensive.
AwHa! I think we have the problem crystallized. You have a shipwreck at anchor. Buying a new chain and anchor will not solve your problem. I suggest getting another sailor out there to look at your boat before you try anything else....
Preferably one that is free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
AwHa! I think we have the problem crystallized. You have a shipwreck at anchor. Buying a new chain and anchor will not solve your problem. I suggest getting another sailor out there to look at your boat before you try anything else....
Preferably one that is free.
unfortunately you are kind of accurate i guess. with no propulsion at the moment i am dead in the water. luckily i am currently moored very well. but i do need to give that one up. regardless i need a large anchor to keep the boat in place until refitting can be done.
 
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