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is 1/2" chain too heavy to hoist up by hand? i'm 25 6'2" and 180 lb

  • yes

    Votes: 12 52.2%
  • no

    Votes: 11 47.8%
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Boat Bum
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Barquito
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So, I guess the answer to the question of the OP is two part:

1) 1/2" all chain rode with a mud packed anchor, in a storm, is going too be heavy to regularly pull up by hand.
2) Sounds like the boat is not going anywhere soon, so, ignore 1).
 

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Old enough to know better
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problem is I'm living on it right now :p but I've heard of a boatyard in fort pierce that will put her on the hard and let me live on here there while I work for 150 haul up + 150 bucks a month rent. Might do that at some point. in the spirit of the carribean i might find an island where work can be done and put her up on a beach while camping under some palm trees nearby XD
well 150 a month is dirt cheap, so I would go for that. I understand you are tying to find your outboard, likely finding a used one will be more efficient, just factor the cost into a lesson to make sure it is fixed to the boat better. Old cheap wooden boats rarely float for very long. So I would work on getting the boat out of the water as quickly as you can. Getting the inboard working will make your life easier as you can charge batteries with it, and make way in rough weather better. Old inboards can often be made to be far more reliable than an outboard. I think photos would be helpful. Do you have sails? Is she a known design make? An older Dickerson wooden boat is quite a bit different from some home built plywood boat made from Home Depot CDX plywood. I understand the interest in keeping costs down, I have a $1000 33 foot sloop, but she is fiberglass and the first week I owned here I put more than twice the purchase price into here. She will safely float now.

I doubt you will find a place in the Caribbean to "camp under a tree" anymore, as those places don't exist or are very dangerous places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)

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Having just looked at your photos, I'd say you have your work cut out for you.

When that boat goes on the hard you might expect it to be there for a year or two, and unless you go with Home depot lumber to keep the boat afloat, my guess is 10s of thousands of dollars in just in wood to make the boat look good. A single board of teak can cost $100.
 

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Why would you raise your anchor when you cannot go anywhere? Do not worry if you need to move the boat in the future you will need to tow the boat and in this case there will be someone to raise it with you.
 

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The OP should consider that FL is working very hard (particularly Miami) to keep boats from anchoring at all, let alone trying to eliminate derelict propulsion-less boats from sitting on anchor for months/years at a time.

Although, I don't really understand why the question was even asked, if the boat never moves. Why would one care if they could pull it back up? Florida anchoring thread fodder perhaps?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
the plan is(and what I am doing) is working on the boat while at anchor there. And at the point that I find a good place and price to haul it out to do major work on it I will. That may be this summer. Currently I am actually aground thanks to a guy who was letting me use his mooring, then when he towed me off it moved me to somewhere too shallow. He thought we were at low, and I was just aground there, really it was high, so at low I am at 45 degrees.
So it's not really that big of a danger. I can stand with my head above the water where she is now. Even if she sank...well it's impossible because she's already on the bottom. The deepest place in the anchorage is 15 feet. in the event that the boat was sinking and I just woke up to it, well the hatches actually would just float off. By the way, just because I don't have a lot of money doesnt mean I can't have a boat, or do work on one. That's something most of the people on the water evidently don't understand. Not saying I don't wish I had more money to rather than run around all day today looking for random crap, and trying to fix my yamaha outboard motor myself actually pay someone to service it, but I don't. Actually I am saving money by not paying rent, and the money I spend is on things I actually want. Parts for the boat, repair materials I want to learn how to do etc. If I am in over my head it is only due to the incredibly pathological lack of camaraderie among boaters down here, the lack of human decency in almost all of the on the water businesses and marina clientele. That is one thing i did NOT fully expect. I didn't expect the marinas who are just in it for the money to welcome another anchorite, or to help me out when I need it... but unfortunately even the anchorites are 95 percent scumbags, assholes, ruffians and unhelpful douchebags. That is something I really did not expect, I figured they would be helpful, and it's not like I am expecting help for nothing, but even for money they would rather not help their neighbor , **** around in their dinghies, and go dive another boat. I can see why they are unliked. It is not because of their poverty or lack of business, it's just who they are for the most part. That said in recent days some very nice boats have come int at anchor, and seem to be crewed by very capable people who don't fall in this category, but they won't be here for long.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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well I see a lot of them priced at around 1000 dollars used. And that's what my boat cost including an outboard motor. what could I expect to reasonably pay for a 50-100 lb?
for example

http://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/bpo/5456540110.html

Fortress FX 125 Anchor Like Brand New no pitting, w/ bag yacht boat
The first anchor is gone but the second one is for boats up to 150' long. Spend your money on a used outboard and get the boat to Fort Pierce and out of the water. I know that marina, it is a bit of dump but you will be safe there. Check with some knowledgable people about this boat. My first reaction is that it would be extremely expensive to fix, even with really good woodworking skills.
 

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Not trying to be a jerk but are you sure it's actually safe for your health to live aboard that boat?
I'd be done for after a few minutes below with all that mold, wouldn't be able to breath.
There are many nasty things you don't want to inhale aside from mold, bird droppings can kill, mouse droppings. I restore century homes and churches, I wear a respirator more than you can imagine trying to avoid the nasties.
Quite the project be a lot of time and money invested, seen wooden boats in worse shape brought back, labour of love.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Not trying to be a jerk but are you sure it's actually safe for your health to live aboard that boat?
I'd be done for after a few minutes below with all that mold, wouldn't be able to breath.
There are many nasty things you don't want to inhale aside from mold, bird droppings can kill, mouse droppings. I restore century homes and churches, I wear a respirator more than you can imagine trying to avoid the nasties.
Quite the project be a lot of time and money invested, seen wooden boats in worse shape brought back, labour of love.
Good luck!
no man I appreciate the concern especially coming from an expert that knows what sup. Actually there is not much mold inside the boat. It is dry inside now except for a very slow leak in the hull somewhere emptying into the bilge at a rate of about 1 foot per day when its very choppy. I take off the hatches all day in the sun, and it has vents into the cabin the wind blows into. hasn't been raining much and is now sealed with heavy vinyl fabric I got over the whole cabin.
 

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one thing you can do is to get a chain hook from a hardware store and splice a line to it long enough to reach from the bow to your biggest winch. If the anchor's stuck put the hook on the chain and use the winch to break it loose.
 

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So it's not really that big of a danger. I can stand with my head above the water where she is now. Even if she sank...well it's impossible because she's already on the bottom.
That's not true. When the tide comes in the boat can stay where it is "on the bottom". It is possible the grounding the boat is currently experience can add stress or open up cracks in the boards that were sealed when the boat was floating. If you don't have a depth sounder you should at least have a lead line and a tide chart to determine where you should and should not anchor, its not the other guys fault, he just wanted his mooring back.

By the way, just because I don't have a lot of money doesnt mean I can't have a boat, or do work on one.
You do not have to be rich to own a boat, I am not. You do need some money to own or live on a boat though. Since you balk at the price of used anchors, we have an idea of your budget. You are in for a real shock when that boat goes on shore and you are visiting the lumberyard to repair some (all) of the wood. My guess it will cost $50,000 dollars to get that boat in decent shape and I may be off $25-100k in either direction but it is not a poor man's pursuit.

The reason you are probably having trouble getting those around you to help out is they realize how over your head you are, even if you don't. As the owner of the boat you are financially responsible for it. If it were to drag an anchor or part from an anchor and hit an expensive boat you are responsible for the damages. If your boat were to sink or end up on the shore you are responsible for the salvage costs. My guess is the boat is not insured. Your $1,000 investment could end up costing you $10,000 or more.

Owning a wooden boat is either the pastime of someone truly passionate with a lot of skills or someone very wealthy. Either way you need quite a bit of money to do it. You are better off selling that boat to a very rich aficionado that could afford to rebuild it. If you want to be a person struggling to make ends meet, living on a boat you'd be better off starting with a fiberglass boat or a wooden one in better shape. Get out from that boat before it sinks you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
That's not true. When the tide comes in the boat can stay where it is "on the bottom". It is possible the grounding the boat is currently experience can add stress or open up cracks in the boards that were sealed when the boat was floating. If you don't have a depth sounder you should at least have a lead line and a tide chart to determine where you should and should not anchor, its not the other guys fault, he just wanted his mooring back.

You do not have to be rich to own a boat, I am not. You do need some money to own or live on a boat though. Since you balk at the price of used anchors, we have an idea of your budget. You are in for a real shock when that boat goes on shore and you are visiting the lumberyard to repair some (all) of the wood. My guess it will cost $50,000 dollars to get that boat in decent shape and I may be off $25-100k in either direction but it is not a poor man's pursuit.

The reason you are probably having trouble getting those around you to help out is they realize how over your head you are, even if you don't. As the owner of the boat you are financially responsible for it. If it were to drag an anchor or part from an anchor and hit an expensive boat you are responsible for the damages. If your boat were to sink or end up on the shore you are responsible for the salvage costs. My guess is the boat is not insured. Your $1,000 investment could end up costing you $10,000 or more.

Owning a wooden boat is either the pastime of someone truly passionate with a lot of skills or someone very wealthy. Either way you need quite a bit of money to do it. You are better off selling that boat to a very rich aficionado that could afford to rebuild it. If you want to be a person struggling to make ends meet, living on a boat you'd be better off starting with a fiberglass boat or a wooden one in better shape. Get out from that boat before it sinks you.
that's some sound advice. I'm not going to say you are wrong exactly. But unfortunately that is all easier said than done. Rich aficionados aren't easy to come by as far as I know. If someone offered to buy back the boat today I would probably do it, assuming I could find a BETTER place to live immediately. Again, easier said than done. I wouldn't say I am struggling to make ends meet. I just am struggling to pay hundreds of dollars for a piece of metal that I could buy all the tools and fabricate for less money if I had the wish to do it. I am a trained blacksmith by the way. I could make a shackle in a few minutes that costs 15 full retail. But like I said I mean if I was able to buy a better boat for 2-3 grand I would probably do it. But that't not really possible at this point. There is a lot of stuff that would go into that. Selling this one, buying another one. All of that is hard to do. I guess while i am on that note i will mention that you all as boaters are being severely ripped off by marine dealers, manufacturers and boatyards. But I assume most people know that and just don't care. Materials have a value, and the fact is that they are sold tremendously over value for sinful profit margins. Simply I assume because they can, because people don't have options and are either willing or forced to pay it. Knowledge/skills, I would call invaluable,,, but most boat professionals are probably paid too much as well.
 

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What will you do, if they pass a law that disallows derelict boats from remaining at anchor for more than a month, for example? FL is on that war path. They don't seem to want people just dropping anchor and living anywhere they like, any more than they would want someone pitching a tent and moving into the local park.

I would get the boat on the hard and try to fix it up. However, as others have said, I think you have the wrong boat.
 

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There is a yahoo group where people scour the internet and post boats that are free, or less than $1000. It's called freesailboats. A search on the Yahoo page should turn it up. They post often and it's usually listed by area. There are tons of boats on there , that, while not perfect, should be an upgrade that could save you a lot of work.

There is also an offshoot called sail boat stuff, or something like that, where people list things being given away.

Take a look.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Depends on how strong you are, how strong your back is, and how much regular pain you are ready to endure:) I lift my 3/8" by hand and look at it as morning exercise. It's sometimes a LOT of work if there's a lot of scope out. Can be done IMO but a workout. I'm 60+ and in good physical condition which may help you figure. At 30, would not have given it a second thought.

If you are thinking of leaving the boat for days at a time, the only anchor to trust would be a mooring anchor, like a mushroom of adequate size. Remember you are responsible for any damage the boat does if it drags and damages another boat or goes ashore somewhere. A good mushroom would let you sleep at night. Whether the municipality permits mooring anchors is another question.
 
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