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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, a friend of mine purchased a property recently which has what appears to be a 23 to 27 foot single mast sail boat on the dock.

Now the boat itself is trashed, but I believe the keel is worth some decent money if I can salvage it. How much though is the question. Does anyone know about what it would be worth at a salvage yard or what I could do to find out?
 

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Find out the sailboat model first. The weight of the ballast will vary greatly between a 23' and 27' sailboat.

Look up the model on sailboatdata.com and see if the ballast is iron or lead. Lead is all that has value. A bolt-on lead keel would be the easiest one to salvage.

A metal salvage yard will probably pay you between 25 and 50 cents per pound of lead, you can call local ones to see.

The mast and boom, winches, and any blocks (pulleys) or sails in good shape have value too.
 

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what is the keel made out of? If lead it is worth about 75 cents a lbs. if iron it is worth about 25 cents a lbs. if it is a center board boat it is worth nothing
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is a 27 foot lead keel I just found out. Turns out a friend ran the numbers and found that out. Any of you have any estimation as to what the weight of it might be?
 

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There may also be hardware on the boat that is worth some money - blocks, winches, etc. If it is an iron keel you will probably pay more for disposal than what you will get from the scrap yard. I would probably advertise the boat as "Free to good hands". I have scrapped a couple of boats and can tell you it is more of a headache than a gain.
 

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For a 27' boat you will likely have a keel in the 2000-2500 lbs range. That is over a grand for the lead (depending on the current scrap lead price in your local yard). But getting it there is not going to be a picnic.
 

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Im gonna see if I can find the numbers, where would they be on this particular boat?
You won't find 'the numbers' on the boat.. but if you post a pic someone will recognize it and most of that data is available on line.
 

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If your friend knows it's 27' and likely knows what kind/model of boat it is. You can look up that model and may see what the manufacturer specs are online.
 

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It is a 27 foot lead keel I just found out. Turns out a friend ran the numbers and found that out. Any of you have any estimation as to what the weight of it might be?
As I said you need to get the make and model number of the boat, then look it up on sailboatdata. That will tell you the ballast weight.

You also want to find out if it is a bolt-on keel or encapsulated. Bolt-on will be a lot easier to separate. Looking in the bilge is one easy way to determine that.
 

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Look on the back top right hand corner of the boat, there should be a series of letters and numbers. If you can find it, that number is a HIN. Much like a VIN it identifies the make, model, and actually year and hull number of the boat. You can look it up easily, or report back here and I can run the search for you.
 

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most 27' boats with a cabin will have between 2400 to 3500 lbs of ballast
 

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Can you take some pictures of the boat and post them here? What looks like a boat in "pretty bad shape" to one person may look like the perfect project to another. Before you scrap her, it may be worth seeing if someone will take it off your friend's hands. Remember, when you've scrapped the keel and stripped all the parts, you still have to transport the keel to the scrap yard, and transport the hull (or cut it up) for disposal. Then you have to find buyers for the parts, unless you're just going to sell them for scrap, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Can you take some pictures of the boat and post them here? What looks like a boat in "pretty bad shape" to one person may look like the perfect project to another. Before you scrap her, it may be worth seeing if someone will take it off your friend's hands. Remember, when you've scrapped the keel and stripped all the parts, you still have to transport the keel to the scrap yard, and transport the hull (or cut it up) for disposal. Then you have to find buyers for the parts, unless you're just going to sell them for scrap, too.
I would but we've already gotten it on land, ripped up, and the keel is on the way to the salvage yard

Thanks for all your help guys, and trust me I don't think this thing was going to be a project for anyone. I'll add some more information now that I'm on a computer and can type much faster.

The boat first off was capsized ( I believed that's the word for a boat on it's side in the water, pardon my retardness concerning boats again ) and we had to raise it off the bottom in the 5 foot of water or so it was in. Barnacles were all over it and it had been sitting like that in florida rain and wind for probably 5 years now. Mast was broken off and at the bottom of the river as well, entire side of the cabin was cracked towards the top.

I just don't think it was going to be worth it for anyone in that condition, maybe I should have asked but this guy is a big big time lawyer that owns this land and he wanted it out ASAP
 
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