SailNet Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on a friend's 32' sailboat boat with an inboard rudder. Water is coming in (very slowly, thank goodness) where the bronze rudder shaft enters the hull, and there is a bit of rudder clunking when steering hard. I was thinking rudder tube bearing.

In my prior experience there has always been a fiberglass rudder tube, a piece of hose, and a stuffing box at this location. However, on this boat there is only what appears to be a packing gland. Bronze threads emerge from the hull itself, and the packing gland is threaded on to that.

Does anyone have an idea of what this arrangement is, or how to fix it? It is a 40 year old boat, pretty well built in all other respects - not a shoddy one at all.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
You have enough posts to put up a picture... suggest you use Photobucket.com and upload your pic there, then paste the IMG CODE link direct in your post.

By your description it sounds like a stuffing box gland that may be below the water line?? Could just need repacking - or tightening...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
'sounds just like my 1973 40 year old Morgan. I have a very normal stuffing box formed directly from a fiberglassed mound around my rudder post tube with no rubber hose too. I simply back off the locking nut then tighten the stuffing box or, when required, replace the packing material.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
Extending the tube to put the stuffing box well above the waterline would solve the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,434 Posts

My rudder packing gland looks like this. I believe its Buck-Algonquin. It needs repacked periodically to keep the water on the outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Extending the tube to put the stuffing box well above the waterline would solve the problem.
Yes, but there is no tube to extend. The threads emerge from the hull. Something must be installed on the outside of the boat? The other reply, with the picture, is kind of the idea, but mine has no base plate bolted down, just those threads coming up from below. No tube of any kind, no stuffing box inside the boat.

It's worked for 40 years, so it can't be all bad, but it is disconcerting all the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
............ but mine has no base plate bolted down, just those threads coming up from below. No tube of any kind, no stuffing box inside the boat. .................
I'm OK with the, "no base plate".
I'm OK with the, "just the threads coming up..."
I'm OK with the, "no tube of any kind", but.... I suspect the threads are at the top of a metal pipe (tube).
what is the structure above the threads? What ever is between these threads and the rudder shaft has to be the stuffing box. Describe for us what you have above the threads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Above those threads is what I call a packing nut. It's a bronze fitting, screwed on to those threads, with two nuts. I always thought the stuffing box was that, along with a section of rubber hose. I guess I'm wrong and that packing nut is my stuffing box.

So far so good. The only thing we don't know is where those threads come from, as they emerge from the hull. There must be something on the outside of the boat. The rudder shaft is also held in place at the base of the keel with a bronze shoe, and where it enters the cockpit, through a bearing. So it's not going anywhere.

I'll try repacking the nut, then if that doesn't work I'll investigate on the next haul out.

Thanks everyone for all the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,638 Posts
What about removing nut and gland and clamping on a length of stout hose to cockpit floor should be above wl and maybe not even need a gland.Needless to say when hauled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
What about removing nut and gland and clamping on a length of stout hose to cockpit floor should be above wl and maybe not even need a gland.Needless to say when hauled.
I see some merit to this idea, but some risk as well. By adding the hose you would be removing a strong fixed brace of the rudder post at it's current location just inside the hull. With the rubber hose now in this position there may be more flexing and stress at the lower in of the rudder post that was not engineered in the original design.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top