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Sailing one of these transatlantic would be problematic. It is so slow that you'd need to carry extra stores of food & water - which would make it even slower. There might not be room for the crew, with all the food.
 

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And, if you're thinking about buying it, look at the 25D model instead. Standing headroom and an inboard diesel. I had one and it is still the boat I wish I'd never sold.

They only issue was that when it was only three years old, it had quite a few blisters on the first haul out. It was a 1982 model.

I'm a big Cape Dory fan and I would love to have one of their 40 or 45 models, if I could swing it financially.
 

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1.Critical points for a 1974 Cape Dory 25 survey before to buy ?
2.Options for boat delivery in EU?What documents must be provided?
3.It is able, by technical view, to cross the ocean during a optimal weather window?
Can't help you with 1 or 2. As for #3, people have crossed with lesser boats properly prepared. I think the problem would be that it would cost you quite a bit to get the boat (especially of this age) ready for the trip - including paying for a lot of things that you would probably not need if you are going to use it for a coastal cruiser in Europe - e.g. a proper lifefraft and EPIRB.

I agree with the suggestion about the CD 25D which is a much nicer boat than the CD 25.
 

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1.Critical points for a 1974 Cape Dory 25 survey before to buy ?
2.Options for boat delivery in EU?What documents must be provided?
3.It is able, by technical view, to cross the ocean during a optimal weather window?
(1) sailingdog's boat-inspection tips

(2) Sorry, can't help.

(3) It *can*, suitably prepared -- whether you would want to is a different question. You probably won't enjoy it.

Good luck!
 

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Given the width and breadth of the European market I'm wondering why are you shopping in North America? I'd expect there would be no shortage of similar/suitable boats already in the EU, especially if an Atlantic crossing is not the primary objective... or is it?
 

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My advice? Get a Folkboat somewhere in EU. Crossing the Atlantic in CD25 can certainly be done - it is a very solid design - but it is too much hassle and cost to do it. Add the crossing money to your boat budget and get a nicer boat in EU. I have also heard that importing an older boat involves a hefty tax.
 

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2.) Getting that boat to the EU is not impossible, but it will likely take a lot of money. It will need new rigging for sure, sails, unless they are very recent, and many other parts. To prepare that boat for a trans Atlantic crossing could take close to twice or three times the selling price depending on your standards. I also think you will need builders documents and Cape Dory has been out of business for a long time. They may be available, but make sure first. Make sure the standards it was built to will be accepted in the country you are exporting it to. I have heard that most EU countries are hard to bring boat into and likely going to be taxed quite high.

Seems like this is really not very feasible, as I can't imagine the boat would sell for much in the EU. The suggestion of a Folkboat is a good one. Likely many available, and likely sails at least as well if not better. Would have close to as much room below, though not as much as a CD 25D. Or a Contessa 26, or lots of others that will cost less than the upgrades needed for the crossing. I would look in England there seems to be a lot of small cruising boats along the lines of a CD that are quite affordable.
 
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