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The boat I’ve fallen in love with is the channel cutter 34’. Hull is made made by the same company and you can have it finished by who you choose. There is one for sale but I don’t like some of the choices made. If blowing that kind of money would do a combo of strip plank and cold molded with grp exterior skins to keep weight, maintenance down and no fresh water leak issues. It was the last Lyle Hess design. Has sufficient volume to be a comfortable long range cruiser. Is drop dead gorgeous. Said to sail well with good passage times. In your position would buy that hull and have it shipped to you in Australia. There are great builders in your country to finish it exactly to your specs.
The BCC has a huge following. As a cult boat resale is improved. Support is improved.
Problem with all three designs is the amount of exterior wood to the point on some some of the wood has been painted. Although the N.A.s have learned a thing or two since Hess’s time both are fine seaboats so I think if you’re going to put up with the downsides it’s aesthetics that will determine your decision. Personally from that aspect prefer the BCC28. Prefer the stern treatment, and divided house.
If going with a Cape George would jump to the 36’. Although they can carry a large load for their LWL they are small boats with space at a premium so the 36’ or up dramatically improves live ability. If looking for that rudder set up the 28 with a trim tab windvane would be my choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Outbound,
Many thanks for taking the time to reply. I have considered many sailboats (Tri's, Cat's & Mono) and different displacements (Pogo, JPK, Halberg-Rassy, CGC) and finally decided (well, this week anyway :wink) - on the CGM-built full displacement, which I believe would best suit my own purposes. Although my wife and I are currently cruising Australia, our home town is Vancouver, Canada, - so the plan would be to have the entire boat built at CGM in Washington State, USA. I'd most likely hang out on location for as long as they'd have me. Cape George Marine now build CGC's and BCC's at the same yard.

I fell in love with the BCC28 many years ago as read through all of the Pardey books. I was not particularly enamoured with the boomkin though, so looked for alternatives and found the CGC31 - which seemed to be the nearest CGC model - size-for-size, build-for-build, and purpose. Then, I considered a larger boat (like one does :wink) and looked the full range from 31' to 45', finally settling on the 34' - as you love too. However, as time goes on I keep falling back to my old default that "less is more" and gone back to the smaller boat. The decision now is just which smaller boat - BCC28 or CGC31?

If built, I would have all exterior wood covered with epoxy, and painted. No exterior wood apart from the Tiller. I too love the divided house - especially the clear area around the mast to work. The only design change I have considered is the addition of a rigid doghouse which I have seen done quite successfully before, keeping the looks and spirit of the original design.

So, considering I've made my mind up to go with the smaller boat, I believe you're favouring the BCC28. Thanks for your participation. :)

Summary
BCC28 = 1, CGC31 = 0.
 

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Hi Outbound,
Many thanks for taking the time to reply. I have considered many sailboats (Tri's, Cat's & Mono) and different displacements (Pogo, JPK, Halberg-Rassy, CGC) and finally decided (well, this week anyway :wink) - on the CGM-built full displacement, which I believe would best suit my own purposes. Although my wife and I are currently cruising Australia, our home town is Vancouver, Canada, - so the plan would be to have the entire boat built at CGM in Washington State, USA. I'd most likely hang out on location for as long as they'd have me. Cape George Marine now build CGC's and BCC's at the same yard.

I fell in love with the BCC28 many years ago as read through all of the Pardey books. I was not particularly enamoured with the boomkin though, so looked for alternatives and found the CGC31 - which seemed to be the nearest CGC model - size-for-size, build-for-build, and purpose. Then, I considered a larger boat (like one does :wink) and looked the full range from 31' to 45', finally settling on the 34' - as you love too. However, as time goes on I keep falling back to my old default that "less is more" and gone back to the smaller boat. The decision now is just which smaller boat - BCC28 or CGC31?

If built, I would have all exterior wood covered with epoxy, and painted. No exterior wood apart from the Tiller. I too love the divided house - especially the clear area around the mast to work. The only design change I have considered is the addition of a rigid doghouse which I have seen done quite successfully before, keeping the looks and spirit of the original design.

So, considering I've made my mind up to go with the smaller boat, I believe you're favouring the BCC28. Thanks for your participation. :)

Summary
BCC28 = 1, CGC31 = 0.
Though it sounds as though you have made up your mind, other than the cult/classic design of the BCC, what else is it that makes you choose it? Certainly your choice will be influenced by your intended use, which you didn't go into any detail about. What are your goals?
 

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Bill you ask the right questions. My wife and I have been re-examining just this issue currently. She says she wants to mix it up again as the focus has been international cruising for the 7 past years.
You know logically in mixed fleets in extreme weather full keeled heavy displacement boats faired worst. They were less likely to be able to slide down the side of a wave so more likely to be overwhelmed. You know being hove to or running under bare poles isn’t as effective as using a drogue in such conditions. You know the presence of collision bulkheads can be boat saving. Butterfly hatches and multiple companionways increase potential risk of down flooding. The extremes of breath have their downsides. Too much you can turn turtle and stay there. Too little ride can get difficult as can close quarter maneuvering. With these it’s life on a slant and forethought before backing up.
Still, there’s weather routing and we’re not racing. I sailed this style of boat. There’s something just right about them. JeffH is right there’s been major advances in design since the time of Atkins, Hess, and Monk. But for a small boat they inspire a sense of confidence, have a lovely ride and are beautiful. We’re not always logical. The vast majority of boats don’t fail it’s the captain and crew.
 

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Hi Outbound,
...

Although my wife and I are currently cruising Australia, our home town is Vancouver, Canada
...

So, considering I've made my mind up to go with the smaller boat, I believe you're favouring the BCC28. Thanks for your participation. :)

Summary
BCC28 = 1, CGC31 = 0.
Another data point for BCC 28, there are probably several examples like this for for either choice.

You are probably already following this, but a fellow Canadian is about to depart NZ on the last leg of a solo circumnavigation in his BCC 28.
https://pixiesails.com/

-- KDW
 

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Bill you ask the right questions. My wife and I have been re-examining just this issue currently. She says she wants to mix it up again as the focus has been international cruising for the 7 past years.
You know logically in mixed fleets in extreme weather full keeled heavy displacement boats faired worst. They were less likely to be able to slide down the side of a wave so more likely to be overwhelmed. You know being hove to or running under bare poles isn’t as effective as using a drogue in such conditions. You know the presence of collision bulkheads can be boat saving. Butterfly hatches and multiple companionways increase potential risk of down flooding. The extremes of breath have their downsides. Too much you can turn turtle and stay there. Too little ride can get difficult as can close quarter maneuvering. With these it’s life on a slant and forethought before backing up.
Still, there’s weather routing and we’re not racing. I sailed this style of boat. There’s something just right about them. JeffH is right there’s been major advances in design since the time of Atkins, Hess, and Monk. But for a small boat they inspire a sense of confidence, have a lovely ride and are beautiful. We’re not always logical. The vast majority of boats don’t fail it’s the captain and crew.
Yes, the tradeoffs are numerous and not always obvious or intuitive. I've always loved the 'looks' of the BCCs and I've had an affinity for traditional designs ever since I worked for five years restoring a square rigged barque, during my misspent youth.

My first compromise was to go with fiberglass rather than wood, and a Crealock rather than a full keel. However, if I want the Admiral to join, the compromises may continue. She is not a sailor and even under power, feels like the cabin is a coffin. So, now I'm looking at boats with pilothouses and can easily do canals. I've seen several YouTube couples who seem to really like the Southerlys. Seem like nice enough boats, just not very traditional. :(
 

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Yes, the tradeoffs are numerous and not always obvious or intuitive. I've always loved the 'looks' of the BCCs and I've had an affinity for traditional designs ever since I worked for five years restoring a square rigged barque, during my misspent youth.

My first compromise was to go with fiberglass rather than wood, and a Crealock rather than a full keel. However, if I want the Admiral to join, the compromises may continue. She is not a sailor and even under power, feels like the cabin is a coffin. So, now I'm looking at boats with pilothouses and can easily do canals. I've seen several YouTube couples who seem to really like the Southerlys. Seem like nice enough boats, just not very traditional. :(
Yup the Channel Cutters are about as salty as they get! If ya got money to burn here is one of the most beautiful examples of the 34. Hey it's in the OP's neck of the woods. :) We have two BCC 28's at our marina.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2016/falmouth-cutter-34-lyle-hess--3177299/

Meanwhile, we had eyes for the Crealock designs as well. I also have to keep the admiral happy and that has become more difficult since a sailing, well ex-sailing, friend of ours sold his boat with all of those 'ropes' everywhere and now drives a Grand Banks Trawler. His wife said so...hmmm.
 

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Yup the Channel Cutters are about as salty as they get! If ya got money to burn here is one of the most beautiful examples of the 34. Hey it's in the OP's neck of the woods. :) We have two BCC 28's at our marina.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2016/falmouth-cutter-34-lyle-hess--3177299/

Meanwhile, we had eyes for the Crealock designs as well. I also have to keep the admiral happy and that has become more difficult since a sailing, well ex-sailing, friend of ours sold his boat with all of those 'ropes' everywhere and now drives a Grand Banks Trawler. His wife said so...hmmm.
That BCC34 is gorgeous.

Yes, those pesky ropes and all that tipping over to the side business. I don't know, maybe a trawler is in my future, maybe a Selene or a Nordhavn. It would beat not having a boat at all.
 

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The 34 is a thing of beauty but you’d be a slave to it unless you had very deep pockets. Unlike oxidized gel coat it won’t be a matter of just buff and wax but many hours of work to keep her Bristol or worse if you didn’t keep on top of it. Had a tayana with wood spars, eye brow. rub and toe rail. Was several weeks of work before launch. That was in New England with low UV. Even with appropriate canvas covers can’t imagine the work if the 34 was taken cruising. Just putting on and taking off the coverings every time you moved would be a PIA. A gentleman’s yacht even with modern coatings. Be a total shame to do anything but bright and ruin her appearance.
Up north would expect to blow 10% of purchase price annually. Inside winter storage with the stick down. Light sand, tape and pull varnish yearly. Wood every 5 years or so depending. Probably higher insurance costs as well. Looking at this from a egocentric view given I would change batteries to Li or carbon foam, add AIS radar and chart plotter, put in voltage isolator invertor and shore power. Then add watermaker, solar and hydro, Winslow raft at the end of the day I’m looking at similar numbers to the outbound for upkeep. Be giving up miles for a days work, AC, central heat, and SPACE.
Boy I love the look of that boat still thinking if I’m up for the dedication required to keep her as she should be.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Guys,
Sorry for the late response, I've out cruising the Whitsunday Islands, with spotty wifi.
My intended goals are long distance single-handing. Thanks for asking.
My wife and I are currently circumnavigating on our trawler, but these questions (and this thread) is all about a time when that has been completed, or draws to a natural end.
I've seen some weather in our time and want a solid vessel which inspires confidence, and has a history of safe passages. The looks don't hurt either. :wink. I want something robust, simple and around 30'. I had considered a PSC31, and a Contessa 32 for a time too, but I keep coming back to old style working sailboats. I will admit it's likely more about the psychological space these boats create (rather than actual sea time data), but hey there you go. I just know how scary it is out there, 1100 miles from land, nothing around you but the mercy of the sea, and the feeling you're on your own. One must have faith in their vessel, and all of the owners I have spoken with (who own a BCC28 or Cape George Cutter) say they had the utmost feeling of well being in their (with these) boats.

Malloc - I did not know about the Pixiesails, thanks for the link!
 

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Hi Guys,
Sorry for the late response, I've out cruising the Whitsunday Islands, with spotty wifi.
My intended goals are long distance single-handing. Thanks for asking.
My wife and I are currently circumnavigating on our trawler, but these questions (and this thread) is all about a time when that has been completed, or draws to a natural end.
I've seen some weather in our time and want a solid vessel which inspires confidence, and has a history of safe passages. The looks don't hurt either. :wink. I want something robust, simple and around 30'. I had considered a PSC31, and a Contessa 32 for a time too, but I keep coming back to old style working sailboats. I will admit it's likely more about the psychological space these boats create (rather than actual sea time data), but hey there you go. I just know how scary it is out there, 1100 miles from land, nothing around you but the mercy of the sea, and the feeling you're on your own. One must have faith in their vessel, and all of the owners I have spoken with (who own a BCC28 or Cape George Cutter) say they had the utmost feeling of well being in their (with these) boats.

Malloc - I did not know about the Pixiesails, thanks for the link!
It'd be hard to go wrong with either boat. While I love the design of the BCC, at 28' it just becomes very sparse on creature comforts. Even things like headroom become difficult. If it were me, I'd either want to go with a considerably larger BCC, where the design features better fit the human form, or staying in your size range, I think I'd go with the CGC.

Of course this is from a person who went with the PSC 34. Solid offshore performance/safety and an above the waterline shape that is pleasing, though not quite the traditional homage of the BCC. OK level of creature comforts, though even there, I sometimes wish for a few more feet of space. As for single-handed sailing, I can tell you that the PSC 34 is very easily single-handed. I assume that since the PSC 31 is quite similar, that single-handing it would be great as well.
 

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You will not go wrong with any of the craft considered. I love the looks of a Channel Cutter, though not wild wild about the uber long sprit only cuz I'm chicken about going way out there for any sail work if getting salty!

We fell in love with the PSC 31 when they first came out as the layout below and the traditional transom were big points for us. All of the PSC Crealock designs are purpose built which is why they have not changed the designs over the years, and they are sill being built, though pricey. As the literature says, "the designs have not changed because the demands of the sea have not". I have never sailed a Channel Cutter but have been aboard more than one, but have sailed the PSC 31 and can assure you that if you have her dialed in she will hold course with no auto-pilot, or hand on the helm. Very seaworthy and sea kindly, and though a bit prejudiced, a very easy look on the eye. Looks and personality!

Regardless before you have any new boat built it would make much sense to sail one. We were attracted by her looks (and of course build quality) but it is her personality that will determine the length of your relationship.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Regardless before you have any new boat built it would make much sense to sail one. We were attracted by her looks (and of course build quality) but it is her personality that will determine the length of your relationship.

Agreed! Thank you for your participation here guys, all very much appreciated. :smile
 
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