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Discussion Starter #1
howdy
plan to leave this weekend, concerns me having to sail across the main shipping lanes going in and out of New York harbor.
Suggestions?
better to be as far offshore as possible?
Have Vesper and radar nevertheless seems challenging no to be run over by a cargo ship.
I have considered going into Long Island and use the inside route but even then will be stuck with having to cross those lanes coming from the south.
thanks
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Two ways to do this trip. Up the east river and then LI sound or straight shot. Have done both ways. Without a doubt straight shot is much faster and much lower stress.
We typically will stay 25-50m off the NJ coast. This keeps you out of virtually all traffic except the occasional ship. But recreational traffic and fish boats aren’t much of a concern. Ideally you pick up the Gulf Stream countercurrent so get a bit of a lift. Prevailings allow for beam or broad reaching so speed is good. The sound can be light air for days with need to power. Also no concerns about tides or races if you go outside.
You need to get pretty far out off the NJ coast to have any real depth. It’s worth it as you get swell not waves or chop. So if weather permits going outside makes great sense. However once in your life you should go inside. There’s nothing like sailing by Manhattan.
In terms of your question you should pass by NY harbor far enough out that shipping is well divided. They do follow two major lanes. If you have AIS not that difficult at all. Just like the approaches to the Chesapeake the closer you are to the mouth the more densely packed shipping is and more difficult to dodge.
Given, like the NJ coast, staying well off the LI coast makes for better sailing would stay at least 10m off the Verrazano bridge or depending upon winds/sea state 25m. Much of this trips decisions depends on prevailings. If you’re depending on land and sea breezes you want to be very close (1/2-2m). If you have a good system following you up just stay off shore don’t stress and enjoy the ride.
Btw the NJ shore is one of my least favorite places to sail. If it’s snotty the waves break. No easy places to ditch. Boring coast line. As bad as going up the Delaware to the C & D. Either too much or too little wind. But Block is fun as are the Elizabethians
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate and thank you for taking the time.
will go outside, you are correct on the level of stress, found that a major issue when single-handed, too many things to deal with, tides, winds, traffic, electronics, night approaches to anchor or docking, etc
Outside it is.
David
 

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Just sail your course line. I believe Cape May to Montauk "R-2" is 047 deg M. 197 miles. Head east a little out of Cape May about 2-1/2 to 3 miles before heading NE. Your furthest point from land will be around 34 miles. The Shipping- traffic separation lanes should be charted. you'll be outside the outer edge of the approach to NY

Looks like you have NW winds until Sunday night, then shifting W, and then SW and S. until Wed. Obviously the W, SW, and S are your friend.

You may see some shipping. More as you leave the jersey coast, and then as you approach L.I. But they could be anywhere.
You'll Certainly see commercial and recreational fishing boats. It's Summer. Just keep watch. You'll be fine.

P.S. Set a Preventer if you need to.

You might want to try to plan your arrival at block in Daylight, if you've never been there. It's a somewhat narrow entrance that takes you close to the beach. Then of course finding a suitable anchorage or a mooring ball is challenging this time of year. if you get there early a.m. you might catch someone leaving a mooring. Good Luck, Safe Passage.
 

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We done both ways. Straight from Cape May to Block (39 miles ) or up the NJ coast and out the Sound. If it’s a [email protected] I say do the coast. There are a few nice stopovers, Atlantic City, Barnegat Light, Atlantic Highlands. And as Outbound said you MUST do the East River once in your life at least. Also there are many neat towns on the LI Sound.

The inside route takes you next to the main shipping channels, no worries except the Staten Island Ferry which takes no prisoners. On the outside route crossing the three separation zones is no big deal. Especial with the Vesper.

We just came back to the Chesapeake 10 days ago after spending 20 days in that area. The only bad part of the trip..the Delaware Bay and River, home of the infamous square wave and the New Jersey State Bird., .Tabanus nigrovittatus......the biting Greenhead Fly
 

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Chef, I'm sure 39 miles to block, was a typo :) Or, I'd be there every week. ;-) As far as the Staten Island Ferry goes, If you keep to Brooklyn side of the river, and duck behind Governors Island, and use Buttermilk channel, the S.I. ferry is not a concern. There's plenty of other ferry traffic, in lower Manhattan though, but the big yellow bus isn't a problem, unless of course, you need to get up close and personal with the Statue of Liberty.
 

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Believe at this point easiest way to jump up and down the Eastern US coast is.
Bar Harbor
P-town to rest until CC canal is going your way. Going north hole up in onset.
Newport or Block
Cape May
Norfolk
Ft. Lauderdale
Points south

Avoid Georgia, avoid NJ except Cape May, avoid nyc, avoid LI sound unless you have lots of time.
If weather is iffy then use LI sound and ICW from Norfolk to Oriental and C & D canal to have a few days off the ocean.

Biggest jump is just a few days which should allow you to restock fuel, food, water as needed. We can do it without that need as far as Norfolk easily( or the whole thing) but this rough plan should work for just about anyone. Getting in/out of Georgian harbors is a long way. Getting in/out of NJ harbors other than CM can be scary and difficult in strong easterlies. Florida is crowded and expensive with much of it draft restricted. New England is easy/peesy with deep water harbors every few miles but also crowded so it’s increasingly hard to anchor without local knowledge.

Know I’m ragging on people’s home waters. I’m sure they’re lovely. But without local knowledge or experience of your waters the above seems the lowest stress way to get across the eastern seaboard. Wonder what others do.
 

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Will apologize further. The above misses great cruising. You can spend a lifetime cruising New England, L.I. Sound, Chesapeake, the keys etc. Would also note many would add Jacksonville or another harbor near Georgia/Florida border. Would finally note I’m bias by a 6-7’ draft and a 64’ air draft as well as being a total chicken when coastal.
 

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Understood! ;-) Do you skip the Abacos and the Bahamas too? Just a plug for my home waters. The Atlantic Highlands in New Jersey is a boater friendly stop, frequented by many transients. Easy in and out without local knowledge. In the Spring and Fall, there are more Canadian Flagged vessels than geese in port.
No inlet to worry about and the outer harbor is plenty deep. Cruiser friendly town, with everything you need within walking distance. You can get launch service at anchor now for $25/day, or dinghy in. Moorings are $55.00/night. Seastreak, to NYC is right there.
 

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Going through the east river with the current is no big deal and the ferries etc aren't any worst that any harbor on the weekend full of weekender boats. I wouldn't ever consider going around LI instead unless that was where I was heading.

BTw- of all the places you could aim for, BI isn't it
 

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When we were in Barrington RI only went to block on weekdays when school was still in session . Then it was a lovely place to go. So agree with Don on that to some extent. They have awesome fish tacos at the dinghy landing area from new harbor to the beach. Some decent restaurants in old harbor. A bike rental is worth it to get some exercise and time off the boat. On transit mode it’s a stop to get fuel/food. Anchor near the big tugboat. Whole place is loose mud and poor holding like the chessie. Only use chain. Don’t back down. Wait until anchor has time to settle through the goop.
As said above you could spend a lifetime exploring L.I. Sound. But you save a day( even with no stops) and often a lot of fuel going on the out side. Also it’s much less stressful in decent weather when you’re the only sailor aboard.
Are you on a leisurely cruise or just want to get north (or south)? If the later go on the outside.
 

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Chef, I'm sure 39 miles to block, was a typo :) Or, I'd be there every week. ;-) As far as the Staten Island Ferry goes, If you keep to Brooklyn side of the river, and duck behind Governors Island, and use Buttermilk channel, the S.I. ferry is not a concern. There's plenty of other ferry traffic, in lower Manhattan though, but the big yellow bus isn't a problem, unless of course, you need to get up close and personal with the Statue of Liberty.
Lol yes me too. I meant 39 hours.

Yes you can avoid the ferry if you do Buttermilk, but I assumed if you were doing that 1 time up the East River you spoke about, you’d want to go past the Statue of Liberty vs cruise ships and gravel barges on the Buttermilk Channel.
 

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Understood! ;-) Do you skip the Abacos and the Bahamas too? Just a plug for my home waters. The Atlantic Highlands in New Jersey is a boater friendly stop, frequented by many transients. Easy in and out without local knowledge. In the Spring and Fall, there are more Canadian Flagged vessels than geese in port.
No inlet to worry about and the outer harbor is plenty deep. Cruiser friendly town, with everything you need within walking distance. You can get launch service at anchor now for $25/day, or dinghy in. Moorings are $55.00/night. Seastreak, to NYC is right there.
I agree. I understand why many LRC don’t stop in along the Jersey Shore. It doesn’t fit in with their itinerary and consequently most don’t really know the beauty and neat little towns.

There are many and I dare say most who read these threads who don’t do LRC and they should also know the inside passage is not a negative one at all and may meet their needs for vacation and also the type of boats they have. It is also a good way to build up experience for later LRC.

Altlantic Highlands is a nice place. We usually stop there. Since we have a good dinghy we anchor at the end of the protective mooring field. It is a perfect place where you can economically visit NYC from. The Streak will take you to the Financial District and you can take a free bus to the Freedom Tower and 911 Memorial area.

Barnegat is a quintessentially laid back beach town with great seafood, fishing boats for day trip, and a picturesque anchorage behind the lighthouse with a coool ocean breeze most days. The inlet can be dangerous but is doable in most conditions.

Atlantic City is not for everyone, but the Famoius White House subs, Docs Oyster House and the Borgota Restaurants are great places. Easy inlet too.

Cape May is the gem. Great restaurants great shopping, great beaches.

My wife was able to get her coastal cruising experience from these trips so eventually she was willing to make the 39 hour overnight straight to Block or Montauk and even the Delaware at night to catch the current.

I have given advice to many SN who have similar sized and smaller 35 footers like mine how to enjoy the NJ Coast as well as inside passage. In their and my case, the journey is the point vs the destination and it can be a good confidence builder in taking the next step to longer ocean cruising.

Don’t overlook the beauty and sailability of NJ. It requires other skills and has many attractions. It’s shore towns are better maintained than most states as are its beaches and boardwalks.
 

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Chef agree there are many wonderful places to sail and NJ shore is one of them but still contend if you’re trying to go from A to B just like LI sound which I think the world of its fly over country.
For many years kept a boat in Plymouth MA. It’s a truly great harbor and town. Still if I was trying to make time getting from south of the CC canal heading to the maritimes even I would bypass my home town. Takes to long to get in and out. It’s a great harbor of refuge though.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
When we were in Barrington RI only went to block on weekdays when school was still in session . Then it was a lovely place to go.
Are you on a leisurely cruise or just want to get north (or south)? If the later go on the outside.
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Hi
single handed geriatric sailor trying to reduce the stress level as much as possible.
I have been out of cruising and sailing for almost 18 years, now on Martha Lei a 30 Cape Dory MKII.
This is more likely the last shot at longer range cruising and want to make the most without unduly risk.
So far have rounded Cape Hatteras and reached Cape May with a crew, now on my own, the risk of busy sea lanes is there but possible manageable if alert.
 

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Hi
single handed geriatric sailor trying to reduce the stress level as much as possible.
I have been out of cruising and sailing for almost 18 years, now on Martha Lei a 30 Cape Dory MKII.
This is more likely the last shot at longer range cruising and want to make the most without unduly risk.
So far have rounded Cape Hatteras and reached Cape May with a crew, now on my own, the risk of busy sea lanes is there but possible manageable if alert.
Checked my log from when I went directly from Cape May past Montauk to Fishers Island Sound. That is the same distance as going to Block Island. We motored the whole way with a crew of 3 under reasonable conditions—just not for sailing. Cape May inlet to East Harbor, Fishers Island = 36 hours at 2200rpm in our 35 ft boat. Chef’s 39 hour estimate is realistic, but we were not exactly pushing it at the end of a 1700 mile delivery trip.

The OP’s might reasonable assume a 39 hour transit on the outside in his CD 30, but I would be concerned if he is single handing and trying to stay alert for that amount of time. We did not see a lot of ship traffic, but it only takes one missed contact to end the cruise.
 

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Given a very reasonable concern about getting a sleep break in you have several choices
CM to Atlantic highlands ( easy to get in during daylight even if you’ve never been there before).
Then decide outside or inside. Wouldn’t worry much about timing the Race at the end of the Sound as Stonington/ Fisher island sound area are nicer than Block if you go inside. Stonington is a great spot. Only downside is you’re going to pay for a mooring. You still need to time hell gate regardless of size of boat or number of crew. If you go up the Sound the Connecticut side is nicer imho and everything is cheaper as well. You didn’t say if you’re time constrainted. Are you?
Outside is pure sailing and quicker. Virtually no traffic compared to inside to the point of being able to catnap in the cockpit with the AIS zone alarm on.
However in your boat given its days work ( probably under 150m realistically) there’s much to be said for going inside. Basically you’ll have multiple places to take a break. Going outside you have two long legs and no easy harbors of refuge.
 

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.....You might want to try to plan your arrival at block in Daylight, if you've never been there. It's a somewhat narrow entrance that takes you close to the beach. Then of course finding a suitable anchorage or a mooring ball is challenging this time of year. if you get there early a.m. you might catch someone leaving a mooring........
Block Island Race week starts today. It will be crowded.
 

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Been to BI scores of times.... don't go anymore because in season it's way too crowded. Summer crowds on boats or beaches, bike paths or BI have no appeal. Shoulder season is the only time I would consider a visit. Great Salt Pond is full of boats dragging.
 

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Agree that Race week to Labor Day is overcrowded on Block. The place has many good memories of when my family took our boat there, when I was a kid. Very different back then. The Oar did not serve sushi! 🙂

I still try to get there, with my Father, on one night during the summer, when he travels up from FL. He’s in his 80s and I’ll keep trying so long as he can pull it off. I will only go, if wind is forecast <15 kts, for fear of folks dragging around me. I’m happy to take the 50ft hole, in the designated anchorage, which is always the last to fill. Or it has a mega yacht or two and their pro crew know what they’re doing. Mid week is better than weekends. Another tip is to call the harbor master on ch12 and ask to go on the waiting list for a private mooring. They charge the same and will let you know around 3pm, if one is free for the night.

If I’m going for it, I keep the Point Judith Refuge as my bailout. If I’m not happy with being able to anchor, its 90 mins away and always has ample room. A long dinghy ride into the Matunuck Oyster Bar is a pretty nice consolation. You can tie up at their working dock. The refuge itself is nothing to write home about. It’s just a layover/backup plan.
 
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