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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sold my 81' Hunter 22 this year, and upgraded to a Capri 25 (hull #31) for better racing performance. This thread will be a casual documentation of things ive done to it. Hopefully it wont require nearly as extensive of work and repair projects that the hunter did.

Heres the old gal picking her up, and driving the 4.5 hours back home, and her in the background with her predecessor in the foreground the day Lil Nellie got sold. :(

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
As with any trailer it seems, the first step of course was to re-do all the lights. I didnt have any lights the whole drive back, luckily i didnt get pulled over or hit.

8 Pin trailer plug, LEDs with reverse of course, the wide load triple light bar, and some amber marker lights on the trailer fenders and the rear boat pad stands. Nice and bright at night now.
There are no channels on the frame of the trailer so unfortunately the wiring is just run along the inside and ziptied and its not very hidden...oh well. Pardon my gravel pile.

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Also replaced some keel guide boards and covered the insides in bunk carpet.

As part of trailer repair, i added a bow eye to the boat and a winch to the trailer since it will be launched and recovered....alot

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Also, like usual the wiring was total trash, and i love having good boat wiring, so that all got replaced.

First step was to remove and remake the ****ty sink "backsplash" out of some thicker wood, and create a door for the new switch panel and fuse block.

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I found that 6 switch panel on line, fully wired, for like $45, pretty darn good deal to me.

The state of the old wiring:

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After redoing a bunch of wiring, i had the knot meter wired up and working, some blue LED cockpit lights for good vibes night sailing and partying at the dock, the interior lights all swapped out for red/white combo LED domes, and a new stern LED light. I have to do some fiberglass work to fill in the previous bow light hole before i mount the new LED nav lights.

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All 4 interior lights on the white setting, then red setting:

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Cockpit lights:

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Took her out for the maiden voyage last weekend, to see if there was anything else we needed to buy before racing began. Honestly launch and recovery went way smoother than expected. Set up and take down with our competent crew was super smooth, regardless that it was only the second time ever setting up this specific boat.

Had some issues with forgetting to turn on the fuel from the internal tank to the outboard multiple times throughout the day, but ill figure it out eventually.

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The biggest issue of the day was when the microscopic prop hit the swim ladder, and (my guess) broke the sheer pin on the propeller shaft. Didnt know thats what it was at the time. So with no outboard power and almost zero wind, we drifted and skulled the boat to the marina dock, "borrowed" their courtesy run about, and towed the capri back to the ramp to sling shot it on the trailer to get it out and back home. So i ordered 5 more of those sheer pins.

Broken pin on my 3.5 hp tohatsu
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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
up next:

I have a bunch of rope to get from the post office to replace various running rigging!
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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I enjoyed your write up and enthusiasm. Capri 25's are very nice racer cruisers. They are still very competitive under PHRF and are fun to sail in most conditions. The only negative is that they are very dependent on having high quality genoas.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I enjoyed your write up and enthusiasm. Capri 25's are very nice racer cruisers. They are still very competitive under PHRF and are fun to sail in most conditions. The only negative is that they are very dependent on having high quality genoas.

Jeff
Ya, the extra deck/cockpit space is worth the smaller cabin. I got a ton of sails with it, 13 total. have a racing 155, a cruising 155 in good shape, a cruising 130 in good shape, (along with an 80 and storm jib lol) and this 1.9oz light weight gennaker thing i havent pulled out yet, but it says "max 14 appr" so i cant wait to see how that one works. plus the actual asym of course.

we were immediately thrilled with how much more tight and balanced the boat felt under sail. the spade rudder (vs transom hung) is awesome. light winds, only had it at about 4kts, but it sails so much better than the hunter obviously. Getting crew weight and transfers right is going to be a fun game for sure

i think i got super lucky, and avoided grounding it right off the bat by mere inches, a couple buddies had to swim to the boat from the ramp since the dock wasnt pushed in the water. i motored back in close to pick them up and realized i was getting close to the concrete ramp, and turned 90 immediately within a foot of it and ran parallel with it to get back away from shore... the draft is 4.2 and i could not have been in more than 4.5 maybe 5' of water...before getting to the ramp. woops
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I got a ton of sails with it, 13 total. have a racing 155, a cruising 155 in good shape, a cruising 130 in good shape, (along with an 80 and storm jib lol) and this 1.9oz light weight gennaker thing i havent pulled out yet, but it says "max 14 appr" so i cant wait to see how that one works. plus the actual asym of course.
Tons of sails is the the thing with race boats, but usually many of them are toast, or near toast. My boat came with 17 sails and so I was blowing up old sails for the first couple years that I had the boat. The only original sails that I still use are a very light weight genoa (max wind 5 knots), the storm jib and storm trisail, and a three of the spinnakers. But having old sails to mess with is kind of fun since it lets you pick the right sail for the day. By the way, you probably don't have an assym spinnaker. Capri 25's are not good candidates for those. The chute(s) probably are symmetrical.

Have a great weekend,
Jeff
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Tons of sails is the the thing with race boats, but usually many of them are toast, or near toast. My boat came with 17 sails and so I was blowing up old sails for the first couple years that I had the boat. The only original sails that I still use are a very light weight genoa (max wind 5 knots), the storm jib and storm trisail, and a three of the spinnakers. But having old sails to mess with is kind of fun since it lets you pick the right sail for the day. By the way, you probably don't have an assym spinnaker. Capri 25's are not good candidates for those. The chute(s) probably are symmetrical.

Have a great weekend,
Jeff
oh good catch, that was a mistype. its a symmetrical. totally agree, luckily the racing sails are like, 4 seasons old, and the "cruising" sails still have a nice stiffness and crinkle to them.
 

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I will hop along with Jeff's comments.
I killed it with my Capri 25. Some things you need to look out for - I got to see several of these weak points in person.
Scuppers through the hull in the stern, the copper tubes they used are likely failed... Drill bigger holes and make new scuppers with flaps that prevent following waves from coming in.

Check the compression post, specifically check to see if the floor is sagging below it. The block of wood under the compression post fails in nearly all these boats, its an easy fix while mast is down.

Chainplates, they almost always leak becuase someone decides to use silicone to seal them. Use Butyl tape, but more importantly verify that the bulkheads are solid (they look it in your pictures which is good - you would see water staining on the bulkheads if the chainplates were actively leaking).

Rudder post is usually wobbly... lots of reasons that can cause this, but if you have as little as a 1/8 of an inch of play in the post, it can translate into 1-2 inches of movement at the bottom of the rudder (causing hard pulling while working upwind). Largest supplier of Catalina Yacht parts in the country (catalinadirect.com) Catalina direct can help with proper rudder bushings to help bring it into alignment. Also the Catalina Capri 25 association is a good place to get more expert advice on the boat.

The trailers for these are usually triads, but many don't have the poppets set where the bulkheads are... its very possible to overflex the hull if the proper placing of poppets are not done (or one is to high/low, or not enough weight is on the keel).

As Jeff said these boats are nearly 100% genoa driven. Headstay sag, and proper rake, and rig tension make a HUGE difference in how the boat performs especially in lighter air. I could KILL people on the race course upwind in under 5knots wind by sagging out the headstay, sailing lower, and feathering up. It would look like I'm sailing lower the whole time, but I'd usually wind up in the same place upwind as the J24s, S2 7.9s, and B25s.

Downwind is where the boat is a HOOT! Under Symmetrical spinnaker - the one designed for it, is a sight to see. Its a LOT of spinnaker, and the boat can be fun to keep under the spin as it starts to get above say 15 knots.

The boat is a light air killer. Hands down.

As I nice boat to just sail, and have teach you, it can be very forgiving, but will reward the skipper who keeps close attention to detail.
If you get towards racing - nobody beats Elliot Pattison sails for them.
I owned Hull 278. A boat that will forever be known as the "Ketchup boat" - as in - others had to catch up.

139428
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I will hop along with Jeff's comments.
I killed it with my Capri 25. Some things you need to look out for - I got to see several of these weak points in person.
Scuppers through the hull in the stern, the copper tubes they used are likely failed... Drill bigger holes and make new scuppers with flaps that prevent following waves from coming in.

Check the compression post, specifically check to see if the floor is sagging below it. The block of wood under the compression post fails in nearly all these boats, its an easy fix while mast is down.

Chainplates, they almost always leak becuase someone decides to use silicone to seal them. Use Butyl tape, but more importantly verify that the bulkheads are solid (they look it in your pictures which is good - you would see water staining on the bulkheads if the chainplates were actively leaking).

Rudder post is usually wobbly... lots of reasons that can cause this, but if you have as little as a 1/8 of an inch of play in the post, it can translate into 1-2 inches of movement at the bottom of the rudder (causing hard pulling while working upwind). Largest supplier of Catalina Yacht parts in the country (catalinadirect.com) Catalina direct can help with proper rudder bushings to help bring it into alignment. Also the Catalina Capri 25 association is a good place to get more expert advice on the boat.

The trailers for these are usually triads, but many don't have the poppets set where the bulkheads are... its very possible to overflex the hull if the proper placing of poppets are not done (or one is to high/low, or not enough weight is on the keel).

As Jeff said these boats are nearly 100% genoa driven. Headstay sag, and proper rake, and rig tension make a HUGE difference in how the boat performs especially in lighter air. I could KILL people on the race course upwind in under 5knots wind by sagging out the headstay, sailing lower, and feathering up. It would look like I'm sailing lower the whole time, but I'd usually wind up in the same place upwind as the J24s, S2 7.9s, and B25s.

Downwind is where the boat is a HOOT! Under Symmetrical spinnaker - the one designed for it, is a sight to see. Its a LOT of spinnaker, and the boat can be fun to keep under the spin as it starts to get above say 15 knots.

The boat is a light air killer. Hands down.

As I nice boat to just sail, and have teach you, it can be very forgiving, but will reward the skipper who keeps close attention to detail.
If you get towards racing - nobody beats Elliot Pattison sails for them.
I owned Hull 278. A boat that will forever be known as the "Ketchup boat" - as in - others had to catch up.

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what did you do to repair the cockpit drains? after a weekend of sailing i found water in the "bilge" where the battery is, as wekk as the "bilge" below the cockpit seats. my guess is water got in there, and leaked down to the battery area. i dont think its the knot meter or sink through hull, so im going to start with replacing the cockpit drains. Also had water in there (not nearly as much) after a week of heavy rain.

Did you cut out the existing tubes? glass in some pvc?

its set up now with blocks of wood sandwhiched between the cockpit and transom with the bronze tube between them
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
first race was...a failure. impeller shredded (or was probably already shredded, whos to say) on the 2.whatever mile trip to the start line, so the outboard reached 90 gazillion degrees and of course stopped working (not siezed luckily) and there was almost ZERO wind so we were 20 min late over the start line. Oh well, after the race i hailed my buddy who is the race chair (and has the same boat as me)
over the radio
"race committee, race committee, race committee, this is capriola, would you like to come raft up and have gin and tonics and party"

"Capriola this is race committee, since the race has concluded my duties are complete for the day, the crew of little wing would love to come over and party, we will be there shortly"

The rest of the weekend we had to sail in and out of the marina, and also sail to the boat ramp. I love being a navigational hazard.
On sunday at least we got to get the kite up for the first time which was great, just in time for next weekends race. hopefully we do....much better

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what did you do to repair the cockpit drains? after a weekend of sailing i found water in the "bilge" where the battery is, as wekk as the "bilge" below the cockpit seats. my guess is water got in there, and leaked down to the battery area. i dont think its the knot meter or sink through hull, so im going to start with replacing the cockpit drains. Also had water in there (not nearly as much) after a week of heavy rain.

Did you cut out the existing tubes? glass in some pvc?

its set up now with blocks of wood sandwhiched between the cockpit and transom with the bronze tube between them
dug out the copper tubes, ground the hole bigger, and placed a new threaded set of bigger scuppers with auto-close flaps. Worth it, cockpit would drain super quick after that, and more importantly when your keester sinks into its own bow wave downwind under spinnaker doing 10-12 knots, the wave won't fill the cockpit :)
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
dug out the copper tubes, ground the hole bigger, and placed a new threaded set of bigger scuppers with auto-close flaps. Worth it, cockpit would drain super quick after that, and more importantly when your keester sinks into its own bow wave downwind under spinnaker doing 10-12 knots, the wave won't fill the cockpit :)
i couldnt find any threaded scuppers with a small enough flange to fit and not hit the bottom of the cockpit. I found a different style of scupper that I ordered that I hope will fit. we shall see when it gets here
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
next on my list of "how fukd up is fukd up"

I knew there was cracking under the mast base...but after i took it off i discovered all the fiberglass was delaminated and half the screws were pulling out. so i overdrilled the holes to fill with epoxy, then i cut that all out and im going to glass in....6.5mm worth of glass to get the depth back then a few layers on top to tie it all in. lets see how mediocre it looks when im done...

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Nice, I've raced with Ben on Little Wing a few times. Great guy. He mentioned on FB he was helping a friend look at a Capri 25. Congrats on the purchase.
 

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Unhinged and Fluid
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
west marine messed up my shipping address so i got the scupper tubes but not the 4200. So i caked on some clear silicone sealant around the inside/outside of the copper tubes to see if that prevents any water ingress this weekend as a proof of issue of sorts.

Finished up the mast base. Ground off the glass and got it flat, then painted the remounted the mast base w/ new hardware and silicone in/around all the holes. i didnt want to bother with gel coat so i just went with good exterior gloss paint. most of it is covered anyway. The wood backing of the mast base above the compression post is some trash lol. Im glad its packed with 1 million sheets of fiberglass and epoxy. I feel pretty confident in its structure and strength, more so than that garbage wood/layup that was on before!

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Random pic of the deck mount LED nav light i added a few weeks back. Nice and bright, and no electrical draw as we expet from LEDs.

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I just changed the bulbs in the existing lights to LED, seemed to work well.
 
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