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Rebuilding a carb is more like watchmaking than general mechanic work. And even carb shops seem to screw them up more often than not. A whole new carb can be expensive, but if you can get a "major overhaul kit" for the carb, that's often ~$100 and with a gallon of gumout and an afternoon of patience you can put it back in new condition.

The overhaul kit usually includes detailed instructions, Some drill bits of wire gauges and a small steel ruler to make adjustments precisely are required, nothing exotic. Some needles or fine brushes to clean out the passages, all easily procured. The hardest part is just being patient and methodical. Take the phone off the hook, use some boxes or bags so the small parts can't run away, and take pix with a cell phone or digicam if there's any doubt about how a stack of things go together.

When it is done, if everything is rosy again, you keelhaul the alleged mechanic.
 

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"The hole needs to be free of crap. " And the pin needs to be "perfect" as well. If someone smashed up the tip (often "rubber") it usually needs a new one, which would be included in most overhaul kits. Or if the guy reamed out the hole with something too sharp, and it has been enlarged too much...that could ruin a carb and make it run rich forever.

You know boat projects, it rarely is over when you thought it would be.

Carbs are one reason that fuel-injected diesel engines became popular. (Until the owners get intimate with diesel and injection problems, anyway.(G)
 

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"A fuel tank with a lot of ethanol crud in it will also wreak havoc"

Any crud will do.

But the most important point is probably that if you can SMELL gasoline, there's probably a fire danger.

1. Call insurance broker, make sure boat is overinsured.
2. Buy marshmallows and sticks.
3. Attempt to repair engine. Using bronze, brass, or beryllium-copper non-sparking tools.

Stick to the sequence and you'll be happy whatever the outcome is.(G)
 

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Newhaul-
"find a mechanic you can trust."
Reminds me of something Benjamin Franklin said, that any three men can keep a secret as long as two of them are dead. So any dead mechanic should be trustworthy, although, I'd still have reservations about some of them.

Paul-
I don't think you'd find engine courses in Community Colleges. In high school trade programs, yes. In "Trade Schools", yes. And some adult ed classes, like the New York State BOCES programs. But with a lot of the trade schools, the problem is that they are "student loan" mills, set up to take in anyone who is interested, get them signed up for government student loans, and then no one really pays a lot of attention to anything beyond getting those loan dollars. Sad to say, but a long-term racket. Asking a local car dealer's shop manager might get you a local referral, if there was one.
A good manual, and some you-tube videos, might be just as reliable a way to start.
 

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I generally don't believe in magic elixirs, my faerie godmother told me they are all worthless. But I must confess that I've only heard good things about MMO, from people who have had, ah, intimate relationships with engines. Even in that context, I'd also say run that fuel out, or switch your fuel supply to a smaller "just gasoline" mix to see how it runs. Is there a chance you misread or miscalculated, and added way too much MMO?

I knew someone who misread and added 1/4 cup instead of 1/4 tablespoon of vinegar in a chocolate cake mix. Um, yummy. (Not!)
 

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IIRC the 3M "pads" were actually invented by Philips (Petroleum) in the very early 60's, and designed as road underlayment to ensure drainage.

But the modern ones from 3M are actually color coded, each color is a different hardness and 3M will gladly tell you which is which, for whatever trade you are buying them. Kitchen scrounge pads, green versus blue. Janitorial buffing machines & automotive products, usually red/white/blue. IIRC the white ones were the ones that were softest in that set.

In the US, orangewood "pusher" sticks for cuticle manicures are probably the softest "dowel" material. Never seen them in the hardware store though.

Pipecleaners and a bucket of Gumout.(G)
 
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