SailNet Community banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
burning rich, very rich. Float not set properly and idle/mixture not set properly. Don't waste your time on a compression check.

Be VERY careful with "the boat smells like gas" as vapors/fumes can cause problems.

Get it fixed, properly or do it yourself. At this point you would be better off ordering a new carb and replacing it yourself, than to give this person more money to "repair" what he has already broken. No more money for him, till it idles smoothly. He is not a mechanic.

While you may have a valve or piston problem, that is secondary to the carb getting repaired.
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/165858-drain-not-drain.html

I also loaned him my 2HP Honda 4 stroke, same result. Even after I cleaned the carb twice, I could never get it to run spot on. A $100 new Honda carb did the trick.

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
Rebuilding a carb is more like watchmaking than general mechanic work. And even carb shops seem to screw them up more often than not. A whole new carb can be expensive, but if you can get a "major overhaul kit" for the carb, that's often ~$100 and with a gallon of gumout and an afternoon of patience you can put it back in new condition.

The overhaul kit usually includes detailed instructions, Some drill bits of wire gauges and a small steel ruler to make adjustments precisely are required, nothing exotic. Some needles or fine brushes to clean out the passages, all easily procured. The hardest part is just being patient and methodical. Take the phone off the hook, use some boxes or bags so the small parts can't run away, and take pix with a cell phone or digicam if there's any doubt about how a stack of things go together.

When it is done, if everything is rosy again, you keelhaul the alleged mechanic.
Good points. I have been successful at doing what you described many times.
Had I known the Evinrude carb was $400 I would have pulled the old carb & brought it home with me for a try. But, due to distance & logistics, I just bit the bullet & ordered a new one.

You really don't have much to lose by trying a re-build/cleaning first, except you won't know if it worked until you re-install & test it, which takes time.
A new carb should work properly right out of the box, needing only low speed mixture & idle speed adjustment, as compared to a couple of hours "cleaning" it.

I like to lay out the parts, "up" side up, in sequence from left to right, in order of dis-assembly, on a large, clean towel to be reversed on assembly. Even if you have a good parts diagram or a good shop manual, good, close up digital pictures would be a big help. Suggest you "go slow" & be gentle. Some carbs have small spring loaded "check balls" most difficult if they spring out onto the floor. :D

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
How about:

1.Opening every hatch, port, or other opening you can

2. Turn off the gas at the tank

3. Sop up any gas that is visible

4. Disconnect from shore power

5. Go have a long lunch

6. Remove carb & take it home to clean in a well ventilated garage

As others have mentioned, if you can smell gas, heap big trouble. :(

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
First, not all "professionals" are experts, or conscientious . I am not even close to being an expert on anything. Fortunately, my Dad started teaching me how to work on engines about 68 years ago. I don't know what your mechanical experience level is so forgive me if I am speaking out of turn.

I would imagine that Community Colleges, or something similar, offer small engine maintenance courses? That & a good shop manual or equivalent, can take you far. It is my opinion that the more work you can do yourself, with some limitations, the better off you are. Carburetors & distributors are generally fairly simple. However, a diesel high pressure injector pump is not. Older gas engines are relatively simple & easy to work on, in my opinion.

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
Newhaul-
"find a mechanic you can trust."
Reminds me of something Benjamin Franklin said, that any three men can keep a secret as long as two of them are dead. So any dead mechanic should be trustworthy, although, I'd still have reservations about some of them.
Paul-
I don't think you'd find engine courses in Community Colleges. In high school trade programs, yes. In "Trade Schools", yes. And some adult ed classes, like the New York State BOCES programs.
Just a guess. I took night courses in welding at the local high school shop. If the OP does a search, he can probably find a course. If he has basic mechanical knowledge & basic tool skills & a good shop manual, he should be OK.

But with a lot of the trade schools, the problem is that they are "student loan" mills, set up to take in anyone who is interested, get them signed up for government student loans, and then no one really pays a lot of attention to anything beyond getting those loan dollars. Sad to say, but a long-term racket.
Interesting, I didn't know that

Asking a local car dealer's shop manager might get you a local referral, if there was one.
A good manual, and some you-tube videos, might be just as reliable a way to start.
I forgot about you tube, right, I have seen some of those, like how to time a VW diesel, something I have done many times. Brought back some memories.
It is absolutely amazing what you can find on the internet.

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
Sorry you feel that way there are many people that trust me to do the best job I can do on their vessels and I have been doing it for over 20 years so I must be doing something right
If you have a big return clientele, you must be doing it right. When I said :

First, not all "professionals" are experts, or conscientious
I didn't mean to imply that all "professionals" do sub-standard work.

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
If you are shutting off the gas at the tank, the leak may be from a loose fitting or a crack in the carb body, assuming the tank is higher than the carb. If the tank is higher & the fuel
is left on, & the float is set too high, or not closing, the leak could be from the float?

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
Update: took the carb apart and examined it closely. The float was indeed functioning. I also pushed the float down in a cup of water to see if it had any leaks. No leaks. Put it back together and installed it.
The engine fires up, runs steady (no more knocking), but still smokes. There is also what still appears to be some oily residue on top of the water from the exhaust. The oil pressure was steady at 40 psi. Oil level the same- not drinking oil. Set the mixture screw to one and half turns out. Tried turning it in half a turn and also the other way a half a turn. Doesn't stop the smoking/oily residue. I can't figure it out. Left absorbent pads under the carb. Going to see if it is still leaking on the next trip.
I guess checking the combustion is the next step. The only other thing I can think of is the Marvel Mystery Oil that is in the gas. I add a few ounces per gallon.
I used to run all my 2 strokes at 50:1, which is about 2-1/2 ounces per gallon. Looks like you are running about the same ratio in a 4 stroke, which could be the reason for the smoking. If you can run a separate tank, an outboard tank, perhaps, without the oil, & after a while the smoking stops, there is your cause.

Not sure about the leak, but it is evident because the oil in the fuel doesn't evaporate, like the gas does.

Paul T
 

Banned
Joined
8,867 Posts
Reaction score
571
Yes, it is like cooking with wine- very easy to add too much!
Thanks for the tips, not giving up on this thing yet.
Would it be safe to disconnect the fuel line from one side of the engine side of the Racor filter and put the fuel hose down into a 2 gallon gas tank? I could plug the Racor and move the gas tank into the cockpit, away from any possible sparks.
Not quite sure if I am following your layout? However, I think if you shut the fuel off at the tank, disconnect, & drain the hose from the inlet side of the filter, & replace it with the hose from the outboard tank, which could be in the cockpit, hose length allowing, you should be OK?

Or, you could drain your onboard tank & re-fill with straight gas?

Paul T
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top