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Aquaholic
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For those that still believe that cast iron spreads heat better than aluminium, try the following:

Cut a sheet of parchment to fit the pan bottom. Place it in the pan with appropriate weights - say some dry beans. Put it over a gas burner until the parchment chars. Look at the char pattern.

Do this on both pans.
Well, yes, aluminum transfers heat more quickly than cast iron. The advantage of cast iron is not in how quickly it transfers heat; but in how slowly it transfers heat. The extra mass maintains it;s heat longer, so it will be more stable edge to edge, giving the appearance of being more even.

Adding cold food to cook cools the cast iron pan less than an aluminum one, making the food cook more evenly. This nis particularly important in quickly sauteing foods, esp. searing meat; as it browns it rather than steaming it in it's own juices.
 

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Having cast iron skillet and pots on board depends on the usage. If you are going to use them daily, then have them on board. Because they will always be seasoned by the foods you are cooking in them.
But if you only use them once a month or a quarter then leave them ashore.
This would be the common sense view of the discussion.
 

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Cast Iron Cookware?Cast Iron Cookware?

Cast Iron Cookware-"Don't leave home without it.":laugher
 

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Glad I found Sailnet
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the pointy end is the bow
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Bene,

My youngest kid is a bit of a tree-hugger. He quit using teflon cookware. Something about a molecular change when it gets real hot and how much of it ends up in our body. I don't really remember as it was one of our environmental crisis of the week conversations and it just kind of runs together in my head...blah, blah, blah. I haven't looked into it myself.
 

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We've found a replacement for both cast iron and teflon. My daughter lives in the UK and bought us a titanium SSK skillet after they fell in love with them. Browns as well as cast iron, but is non-stick, and doesn't require plastic utensils . They are pricey, and aren't available in the US as far as I can find, but worth getting if you can get hold of them. The handles are removable too, so they can be used in an oven. We store an 8 and a 12 nested in the oven with the handles removed.

Here's a link for reference. They seem available online a number of places. Both of mine were gifts, so no experience with any online vendor...

SKK Cookware - Compare prices
 

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Aspiring Boat Bum
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Loved cast iron on my boat and had no problem with rust (see previous post on care), but found one serious down side. Had a skillet fall off a counter when an unexpected wave hit and land on my foot. Made me wish for lighter SS cookware.
 

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Old enough to know better
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Harry, what's the problem with Teflon?
The problem with teflon and other non sticks are that they release poisonus gas at around 500 degrees. This temp is very easy to reach. This is one of the first things you learn when you get a bird. No non stick as it can kill them. Now add a small cabin, very unhealthy. personally i like all clad LTD or cast iron.
 

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Telstar 28
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There are a few non-stick coatings that don't exhibit this behavior IIRC.

The problem with teflon and other non sticks are that they release poisonus gas at around 500 degrees. This temp is very easy to reach. This is one of the first things you learn when you get a bird. No non stick as it can kill them. Now add a small cabin, very unhealthy. personally i like all clad LTD or cast iron.
 

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For those who think Cast Iron rusts away to quickly to be of use as cookware on a vessel, consider the Florida Keys light houses built in the 1800's of "Cast Iron" which are still standing tall and strong after 150 years of service. Unlike all the steel bridges.
 

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1977 Morgan OI 30
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Dutch Oven

I'm getting a cast iron Dutch Oven and as the directions Bubb suggests, I'm seasoning the inside and the outside... But I do like the idea of leaving the cast iron off the boat while its moored and just bringing it along for 'trips' where fresh bread will taste sooo good. Great Post!
 

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I love my SS nesting cookware, but I also have a Swiss Diamond breakfast pan that is great for cooking omlets, warming flatbreads, cooking flour tortillas and the like. The Swiss Diamond was a gift, they are pricey but the non stick is very durable. It is small and heavy enough that I have also used it to hold my charts down in a brisk breeze!

Swiss Diamond
 

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My saucepans are stainless, as is my pressure cooker, but the skillet that is used every day is a cast iron Lodge 9" that I inherited with the boat.

This winter it went unused for a couple of months and I found fuzzy green mold growing in it ! I wiped out the mold, heated it up, wiped it down with olive oil: good as new.

My approach is that seldom-used items need to be the most corrosion-resistant. My daily skillet (and daily knife) are cast iron and carbon steel, but my through-hulls and stock pot are bronze and stainless.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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K-
FWIW I was taught that after every use of cast iron, you wipe it down with fresh oil and reheat it (to build the coating) AND lat of all you SALT THE PAN all over. Salt prevents things from growing in that oil glazing.

Some folks wahs cast iron pans after use, some never let water touch them. That's a whole other choice. I'd rather wash, even if that means the glazing wears down more.
 

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Nothing makes corn bread like a #5 cast iron skillet! If seasoned properly it is covered with a black carbon coating that is nonstick and will take heat better than most others.
I have lots of SS pans, but they have to be scrubbed after use, the cast iron pans only have to be wiped and properly dried over heat. I have not problems with rust on properly cured pots and pans, but you have to dry them properly over a hot fire and then oil them lightly before storing. Cast iron is just like steel knives, they sharpen easy but you have to care for them or they rust.

Drop a cast iron, SS, or Alum on your foot and it will hurt! ;)
 

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If you seasoned and took care of your cast iron it should be fine out in the sea... Although I am extra cautious, so what I do is that I store my pan where no moisture can get in.
 

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Dirt Free
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Our cast iron pans have been on the boat since 1993, no rust at all. All surfaces were properly seasoned once and once only. We have teflon sleeves for the handles that work very well. Next to the pizza stone on our bbq these are our favourite cooking gear.
 

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