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Looks nice to me...like the idea of a "multi-purpose" storage or other room. I nice ammenity for cruisers and liveaboards.

I am surpised that the LWL is only 38' given that fairly plumb bow. But how they can get a boat this big to only draw 4'10" is impressive. That' only a few inches deeper than my 350.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm really interested in this boat, can't wait to see it. We had a C-36 mkII and loved that while we had it (5 yrs). I had basically made my mind up that my next sailboat would be the C-400. I went onto the Catalina website to view the C-400 again and saw the new 445 and thought ....hello, what have we here....? I think the admiral would have preferred the master aft, that is my only drawback at this point, but personally I like the master forward - to be close to the anchor for checking when on the hook.
 

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Personally...I don't like the layout & design at all. Seems like Cat is getting more and more "dock" oriented with a Hunter like obsession with interiors that only make sense when tied to a dock.
I note that there is no reference in the preliminary specs for how the hull/deck joint is being done...just the mention of an inward flange. Usually they comment on "through bolted on 8" centers" or similar. Wondering if this is simply a preliminary oversight or a real change.
BTW...I am a Catalina fan...just don't like the direction they are going.
 

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Personally...I don't like the layout & design at all. Seems like Cat is getting more and more "dock" oriented with a Hunter like obsession with interiors that only make sense when tied to a dock.
I note that there is no reference in the preliminary specs for how the hull/deck joint is being done...just the mention of an inward flange. Usually they comment on "through bolted on 8" centers" or similar. Wondering if this is simply a preliminary oversight or a real change.
BTW...I am a Catalina fan...just don't like the direction they are going.
Agreed.

Brian
 

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I'm really interested in this boat, can't wait to see it. We had a C-36 mkII and loved that while we had it (5 yrs). I had basically made my mind up that my next sailboat would be the C-400. I went onto the Catalina website to view the C-400 again and saw the new 445 and thought ....hello, what have we here....? I think the admiral would have preferred the master aft, that is my only drawback at this point, but personally I like the master forward - to be close to the anchor for checking when on the hook.
But the 400 for a master aft and lots of room (our choice). It honestly is one of the best boats made. She is fast, sure footed, points well (at least the pre hull 307-312's did... the newer ones fo not point quite as well). She has great storage and is well apportioned.

Buy the 42 for a master forward or for 3 cabins. She points well (almost as well as the pre 307 c400's) and is pretty fast. She is not as sure footed as the 400 and not as fast, but there are some positives in the design along with some negative tradeoffs. I would be happy to discuss.

Buy the 470 if you can afford more money and really like the layout of the 400, but NEED (NEED) more room and storage. I like the boat and going back, I would have strongly considered it. Still like our 400 better for our use.

If spending 150k or under and want to go cruising, buy the 380 (no longer in production). We LA'd it and it is solid.

If more coastal, buy the 36. No longer in production either.

I can discuss any of the above boats in detail if you want. I prefer the older Catalinas to the newer changes. Even the 400 has gone under many changes I am not happy with.

Let me know id you want more details.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, Brian, I'd like more details.
I was really disappointed to hear what you and Camaraderie were saying about the 445, I'm sobbing over my keyboard - well, not quite.
Dock orientated? No, that will not do. I must have a boat that can sail well and get into the groove. But the Admiral must also like it, and from the first look, I was hoping that we just might have the perfect compromise.
The 400 is definitely a contender but the Admiral wants something a little bigger. I guess it may be the 470, if not the 445.
- Is the 445 dockish like the 350?
- would You take your 400 south through the canal, & over to Polynesia, with your family onboard?
On all points, please advise.
 

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The 350 is "dockish"? And since when is "dockish" even a word? It sounds like some sort of dog. I wouldn't describe my 350 as dockish, though maybe there's an option that I don't have.

As long as I'm taking exceptions to things, I'll also take exception to saying that the new 445 (which no one has actually seen) needs to "liven up the styling"...the whole thing that makes Catalinas great (IMHO) is that while the styling evolves, all Catalinas still look like Catalinas.
 

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Are you talking about the Catalina Morgan 445? I forget the number but they had one at the St Pete boat show in december. It had a very pretty and brightly lit interior. I don't even remember any of other monohulls there(Except the Vagabond) it really sticks in your mind. No idea about its sailing qualities though everything looked like it was laid out thoughfully.
 

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Not that I'll be in the market but I'd like to see the boat in person. My initial impression is that its not any more "dockish" than many other boats marketed as suitable for long term cruising. It seems to me that if the saloon berths can be rigged with lee cloths for use underway, that this would be more suitable than some other boats on the market. Worst case, it appears you'd have useable 2 sea berths in the convertable part of the aft cabin although that is not the most optimal location.

I'd have to see it myself, but it seems to me this boat is more like an IP interior than a Hunter.
 

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The 350 is "dockish"? And since when is "dockish" even a word? It sounds like some sort of dog. I wouldn't describe my 350 as dockish, though maybe there's an option that I don't have.

As long as I'm taking exceptions to things, I'll also take exception to saying that the new 445 (which no one has actually seen) needs to "liven up the styling"...the whole thing that makes Catalinas great (IMHO) is that while the styling evolves, all Catalinas still look like Catalinas.
What do you mean "which no one has actually seen" the brochure is on their website!

Look, here it is...



 

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Yes, Brian, I'd like more details.
I was really disappointed to hear what you and Camaraderie were saying about the 445, I'm sobbing over my keyboard - well, not quite.
Dock orientated? No, that will not do. I must have a boat that can sail well and get into the groove. But the Admiral must also like it, and from the first look, I was hoping that we just might have the perfect compromise.
The 400 is definitely a contender but the Admiral wants something a little bigger. I guess it may be the 470, if not the 445.
- Is the 445 dockish like the 350?
- would You take your 400 south through the canal, & over to Polynesia, with your family onboard?
On all points, please advise.
It is our intention to use our 400 everywhere in this "hemishphere". If you are certain you are going to cross the Pacific, you would probably be better off choosing another boat. It is not to say that you cannot, but there are better boats for it which are built to that purpose.

Let's discuss Design basics. These are generalities, as there may be exceptions to these rules here or there... but in general (in our price range) these are good rules of thumb.

Production boats, in general, are made for primarily coastal work. When you get into the larger boats, they become more suitable for longer jaunts offshore. THere are many differences/aspects to these boats that make them very good for that design. These are:

1) Lots of hatches for ventilation and light.
2) Designed for winds 10-30 kts in general. Good performance in light airs.
3) Strong focus on interior layout and comfort at anchor/marina.
4) Less robust hardware which keeps costs down.
5) Generally low fuel and water capacities.
6) Large cockpits for entertaining and comfort.
7) Small lazarettes so that more room is translated to the interiors.
8) Generally have sugar scoops for ease of boarding from water and enjoyment at anchor.


Typical "Blue water" boat.

1) Fewer hatches and darker interiors. Often less ventillation. THis may be over compensated for with Dorades (which I believe any ocean going boat should have, but that is another discussion). Certainly this may be debated, but hatches see a vulnerable point on a boat. I am not saying that blue water boats do not have hatches, but certinaly are not the light, airy interiors that is typical with most "coastal" boats.
2) Generally heavy/robust boats. Where as the typical coastal boat might be able to avoid any nasty stuff by waiting out weather windows, you do not have that luxury when making long crossings. Sooner or later, you will be in a blow and it may last for days. THis is when the typical blue water boat has a nice easy motion and takes a beating. Production boats are lighter (not always a bad thing... I am generalizing) and certainly not as well prepared for a beating. I can discuss in more detail if necessary. But the portholes, hatches, cockpit, bulkhead, and in my opini the rigging, simply is not designed for days of pounding.
3) The design on most blue water boats is for lots of storage and tighter spaces for transversing the boat at sea. THis obvioulsy makes the inside more cramped.
4) These boats are made to take a beating and the hardware is appropriately selected for it. Mast, rigging, stanchions, etc are "over built".
5) Without exception (that I can think of), blue water boats have large capacities of fuel and water. THe positive of this is it allows for a lot more motoring and travelling to distant shores. The negative is that you may not cycle the fuel enough if you are coastal and just island hopping.
6) Almost without exception, blue water boats have small cockpits. THis is so that you have a smaller, controlled environment when getting bounced around, and so that if you get pooped, there simply is less volume of water to fill the cockpit. The negative is that a huge amount of your time is spent in the cockpit - especially at anchor. You will have lots of people over at anchorages. THese cockpits do not accomodate that very well at all - compared to a production boat.
7) Without exception that I can think of, blue water boats have large lazarettes for lots, and lots of storage. THis might include extra hardware, sails, lines, etc. The reason for this is obvious.
8) Seems like there may be a blue water boat with a sugar scoop, but I am having a difficult time thinking of one this morning. Most have swept back or may be canoe stern. The reason being that you have less area vulnerable to a following sea. This becomes especially important when they start breaking on the stern and the water wants to push you around to beam on or broach. I have been in these circumstances and can tell you that it is an issue.

THere are other things that I have not mentioned, including (maybe) watertight bulkheads (not all BW boats have them), protected running and rudder, etc. Some production boats have done a better job at protecting these than others.

So ater reading everything, you may be under the opinion that every boat going to sea should be a blue water boat? There certainly are people (even on this forum) that feel that way. I strongly dissagree. Each boat has a design purpose. You can go the islands with a blue water boat. Many people do. But remember that 99% of your time is a tnachor. Your comfort level is MUCH higher on the typical production type boat. You have more liveable space. You can entertain in your cocpit. When you open up all your hatches, you get an awesome amount of ventiallation. It is bright, airy and comfortable. For 99.99% of what you are going to do, this boat is not only suitable, but better suited than the typical blue water boat (for all the reasons that make it a blue water boat). The fact that these boats generally cost less is another positive.

However, when you start talking about making for very distant ports with long passages, there are boats that were built for that purpose. Could you do it in a production boat? Certainly. Many people have. But you need (as Cam as has put it before) more luck than you might in a bluewater boat. From fuel capacities to lazarette, blue water boats are better suited to make those distant ports in safety and comfort.

Two different boats. Two differnt purposes. Now, you might be able to take a production boat and change her such that you have a blue water boat. We have certainly done many of these modifications. However, you start running the risk/reality that you will end up spending more money on the production boat that you would have should you have simply bought the blue water in the first place. Also, there are some things (like rudder protection) that are expeisive and very difficult to change without a major refit of the boat.

SO when I tell people to choose your destinations carefully, I mean it. I really think a person will be very happy with a production boat in the area it was designed for - much more happy than should they have chosen a blue water. I believe they will be happy with the blue water in the area it was designed for - much more happy than should they have chosen the production. Try not to mix the two if you can. Don't buy the blue water unles you are CERTAIN to cross the Atlantic/Pacific.

DId that help?

Brian

PS THese are my opinions only. Take them as such. Some may dissagree, and that is fine. I have seen a bunch of Valiants that are abandoned by their owners because they are uncomfortable at anchor and for what 99% of the boat is used for. I have heard of many productio nboats losing a rudder at sea or them taking a beating in a storm because they pushed the limits of design and safety. But do not underestimate the necessity to have a comfortable boat and the ventilation and cockpit, etc. You will burn yourself out on a bullet-proof shoe box where a production was better suited.
 

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Jesus H.
I'm impressed! Your reply must have taken some time and I appreciate it. Yes, you have answered a lot of my questions and your reply has made me think more about the purchase. Before I go into more of this thread I want to apologize to Soulfinger, when I re-read my post I believe it may have sounded offensive and that truly was never my intention.
FWIW, I'm a Catalina guy. I think once you've owned one, you keep searching for reasons to buy another one, like I'm doing. I still can't figure out why, even when I have literally an entire world of yachts to choose from. I am looking at everything (Honest!) but I keep getting drawn back to a Catalina. I admit, perhaps I need therapy.

Anyway, you're reasoning that 90-odd% of the time is spent on the hook or tied up has helped me the most I guess. Now I can see another reason for the Catalina. I 'm laughing to myself because I know Jeff is shaking his head right now, "Oh no, not another one...." FWIW, I'm looking at Farr's too.
Remember, the Admiral Has to like it or else I'll be doing this thing singlehanded in a 28' Shannon, Alone...
 

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I have owned a Catalina 250, a Catalina 320, a Catalina 380, and now a Catalina 400. My pops has a Tayana 42.

Here is both boats rafted together, with the family jumping off the back. This pic actually shows you several advantages of a production type boat: comfort, room on the transom, lots of hatches, etc. You certainly cannot do this from the Tayana 42!!! But, I like the T-V-42. SOlid, solid boat.



Here is my old 380, right before a trip to the Tortugas...



- CD
 

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FWIW, I'm a Catalina guy. I think once you've owned one, you keep searching for reasons to buy another one, like I'm doing. I still can't figure out why, even when I have literally an entire world of yachts to choose from. I am looking at everything (Honest!) but I keep getting drawn back to a Catalina. I admit, perhaps I need therapy.
Ahhh...... I know the feeling. I only had a couple but it took an extreme change to "kick" for me :rolleyes: CD's picture does remind me how much I miss the ease of boarding though as my canoe stern is a few steps higher to climb than his dads :eek: Instant high dive board though :)
 

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Hey Stan,

you know, as we discuss the obvious negative from a safety point of view of a sugar scoop, you reminded me of a huge safety plus: Getting someone back on board that has fallen over. I will also say that boarding the boat from the sugar scoop and the tender is immensely easier than from the beam, as is common on almost all Blue Water boats.

I mean no offense, but simple everyday life aboard a production boat is so much better than on a BW. From swimming, to boarding, to relaxing. Yes, many people call these dock amenities. But the reality is that when you cruise, your boat becomes your home. Make her comfortable and make her enjoyable. Safety first, of course - but that is more the captain than the boat.

Brian
 
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