SailNet Community banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,680 Posts
What do you mean "which no one has actually seen" the brochure is on their website!

Look, here it is...



Looking at the rig profile here, I see that Catalina has continued the shift toward fractional rig, a welcome change. But I don't understand why they are retaining the large overlapping genoa as the primary headsail. I would like to see a more powerful mainsail and a smaller genoa or jib.

As an aside, while I can appreciate many of their amenities I am not a huge fan of the aesthetics of most modern production designs. But for some reason I find that the "look" of most Catalinas improves somewhat when you cover these profile drawings from the waterline down, i.e. to replicate their lines when afloat. Anybody else notice that?
 

·
Abysmally Stupid
Joined
·
497 Posts
But for some reason I find that the "look" of most Catalinas improves somewhat when you cover these profile drawings from the waterline down, i.e. to replicate their lines when afloat. Anybody else notice that?
John,

I have noticed the same thing. My (soon mine) C400 looks a lot better in water than on the hard. It looks a lot sleeker in the water. It is something with the underbody (hull) that makes it look a bit on the phat side.

OTOH, maybe that's the case with most boats and I have just noticed it on the Catalina's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,909 Posts
John,

I have noticed the same thing. My (soon mine) C400 looks a lot better in water than on the hard. It looks a lot sleeker in the water. It is something with the underbody (hull) that makes it look a bit on the phat side.

OTOH, maybe that's the case with most boats and I have just noticed it on the Catalina's
A bbq helps balance that out. Been telling these guys for years... but no one listens... especially Jeff_h! I think I got Pollard coming around though!!

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,909 Posts
Looking at the rig profile here, I see that Catalina has continued the shift toward fractional rig, a welcome change. But I don't understand why they are retaining the large overlapping genoa as the primary headsail. I would like to see a more powerful mainsail and a smaller genoa or jib.

As an aside, while I can appreciate many of their amenities I am not a huge fan of the aesthetics of most modern production designs. But for some reason I find that the "look" of most Catalinas improves somewhat when you cover these profile drawings from the waterline down, i.e. to replicate their lines when afloat. Anybody else notice that?
Honestly, I like the lines in and out.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
A well thought-out post from CD. Really good ideas about "comfort on the hook".

I agree that Catalinas look better in the water. When I look at a profile drawing, I think to myself "is this really any different than a Hunter?" But when you see them (Catalinas) in the water, they look "right".

I'm not a huge fan of Hunter exterior styling. The one thing that Hunters do have going for them is the more mainsail-driven rig (though I haven't made up my mind on the whole B&R thing). We were out on a friends Hunter 38 the other day, and the 110 jib was SO much easier to deal with than our 135. Tacking was quite a non-event.
 

·
Abysmally Stupid
Joined
·
497 Posts
A bbq helps balance that out.
Brian
That's one of my biggest concerns, not sure where to put my Magma Newport, some knobhead put GPS and Sirius antennas and other low priority items in the spot where obviously the BBQ's gotta be mounted.

I think the Newport will add the final touch, once I find a spot for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
But I don't understand why they are retaining the large overlapping genoa as the primary headsail. I would like to see a more powerful mainsail and a smaller genoa or jib.
Note the vertical battens. It's designed for a roller furling mainsail, which necessarily is going to lose some drive. Hence, the larger genny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I like it!

Firstly, I'm a coastal criuser and don't want or need a BW boat, so we'll get that out of the way up front. I currently own a Bene 361 and am partial to Beneteau and Jeanneau styling. Can't stand to even look at Hunters and frankly Catalina mostly doesn't move me one way or another... blah. Having said all that, I am in the market for a larger cruiser as my three kids have grown us out of the 36'. I've been focused on the Beneteau 46/49 and Jeanneau 45i/49i. The problem is that Bene and Jenny have both narrowed their entry so much that all you get is a cramped vberth in a 45' boat. You have to move up to a 49' boat to get a reasonably comfortable owners cabin in the 3 cabin configuration! Very frustrating, because I really don't want that big of a boat. Enter the new Catalina 445. We got a look at it this past weekend at the Newport Boatshow. Bottom line, I think Catalina did a fantastic job with this boat. The forward owners cabin is an island birth and feels and looks comfortable. Catalina does a much better job than Beneteau in implementing cubbies and draws for storage. Both the salon settee and dining table convert into sleepable spaces. The rear cabins are 60/40, so there is one real nice guest cabin, and a third cabin that can morph into different things, one of them being an double berth and a bunk. Three kids no problem. What's most amazing is that they have accomplished this with a 13'7" beam, less than both Bene and Jenny. From a sailing perspective, it looks like the cockpit layout is designed to sail comfortanbly. I like the furling main, just because I tend to single hand most of the time. You can get a 100% jenny, but I think the SA/D is in the mid 16's (BTW, that is where the Jenneau 45DS is with a 135). The Catalina with a 135% jib has a SA/D of 19.5, which is about where I like it. Yet the D/L is ~185, actually higher than the average big Beneteau. Catalina also integrated the design for an optional bow sprit that holds a code zero furler. So simple, yet the other production guys haven't done it.

I never expected it, but I really love this boat. Great job Catalina. Sorry Beneteau...
 

·
Cal 9.2 SilverSwan
Joined
·
302 Posts
I checked out the Morgan Catalina 44 last year and would conclude that it fit most of the criterion that I have established. A real bilge, not a shallow one to allow water to slosh around in. Wife approval factor (W.A.F.) every where you look. A workroom with a vice and with a washer and dryer. It was a real Winnebago on water. Only question is how does it sail? I also have been a fan of the Caliber boats with the tankage serving as additional safety hulls. You can't beat that for true blue water cruising..
We chartered an IP 380 and what storage areas, real bilge, effective rig great ride.... But back to the W.A.F. Morgan Catalina 44
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,909 Posts
I checked out the Morgan Catalina 44 last year and would conclude that it fit most of the criterion that I have established. A real bilge, not a shallow one to allow water to slosh around in. Wife approval factor (W.A.F.) every where you look. A workroom with a vice and with a washer and dryer. It was a real Winnebago on water. Only question is how does it sail? I also have been a fan of the Caliber boats with the tankage serving as additional safety hulls. You can't beat that for true blue water cruising..
We chartered an IP 380 and what storage areas, real bilge, effective rig great ride.... But back to the W.A.F. Morgan Catalina 44
Note that the 440 is a VERY differnt boat from the 445.

The 440 is a live aboard, comfortable cruiser. The 445 is a rocket meant for coastal racing (though I can make a very strong argument that you can take that boat as blue water as you want).

Just fyi.

- CD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I just got back from the boat show being held outside Houston, and they had a 445 there. In a word: awesome. Beautiful, great design, ready for cruising or racing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
Resurrecting this thread...

Now that the 445 has had some time to prove itself, would anyone care to add to what's already been posted? We saw this at Strictly Sail Chicago over the weekend and the talk in the house about boat buying has been stirred up again, particularly this boat.

If one wanted to get from point A to point B quickly...

If one was going to do coastal and island (Caribbean) cruising...

If one was considering a possible transatlantic crossing and maybe some Med cruising...

If one wanted a boat that could be handled by a couple...

And if one was looking for a liveaboard...

How would this boat fit? What would fit better in the same price range and size?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
Like several others we liked this one better than the offerings from Bene and Jeann. ESP for serious coastal cruising. Liked the storage, still 'nautical' joinery and the port aft multi-purpose space...BUT felt the cockpit hatch access to that area was too open - a fairly large seat locker open to the entire boat. For serious voyaging I think you'd want to do something different there.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top