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A Folk Boat sets off from Cornwall en route to Ireland. With no engine on board the skipper sculls his way down the River Helford in search of better winds and more sea room.

A less patient yacht tries to overtake, but quickly grinds to a sudden stop when they wander out of the main channel...


I know the owner of the Folk Boat. He removed the engine for more room down below. I'm not sure what you think, but for me an engine is quite a nice luxury!

Pete
 

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"I know the owner of the Folk Boat. He removed the engine for more room down below. I'm not sure what you think, but for me an engine is quite a nice luxury!"

I think a hot water heater is a luxury aboard a sailboat, but an engine? Not if you want to sail when it pleases you, rather than when conditions permit.
We've used our engine about 20 hours in the last year with about 2500 miles of inter-island sailing, but it's so nice to know it's there if we were to need it.
 

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its a folkboat

basically its like sailing a dinghy...with the benefit of a full keel!

wind dies, throw the anchor over the side and wait for the wind to pick back up or the tide to take you back in out or whatever

the more I think about it the more I curse the day I sold my folkboat

its sailing at its essence, simplicity, there is NO neeed for an engine

big boats different story all together, especially regarding forces involved...

again just different views on sailing all together...thats whats great about sailing so many options to chose from to please you.
 
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A friend has an engineless 30' boat that weighs about twice as much as a Folkboat. He rows it along pretty well, faster than I ever expect.

Sailing has been around a lot longer than engines, let alone reliable ones. For someone interested in sailing, but without tons of money, there are a lot of very nice older sailboats out there that are dirt cheap because they need a re-power. A de-power is another cheaper option.

We were cruising together this weekend and the first couple miles of our journey were in very very light airs. I motored that portion while he rowed. I got back to our marina about an hour faster, but we both had a great weekend and that is what matters. He probably burned off a couple of extra beers doing that sculling.

I do think that sailing motorless makes you a better sailor for when it really matters (like when your motor has failed and you are approaching a lee shore in a gail). He is more comfortable handling his boat in tight conditions than I am with mine, and I feel like I'm already more comfortable with that than most cruisers that I see.

I'm glad that my boat has a motor, but admire those sailors who learn how to get along without one. I also like my steady income, benefits, 401k, etc, but admire my friends from college who have chosen a route that has allowed them to spend a lot of their 20s and 30s traveling and exploring the world instead of just working. I don't think either path is "right", they are just different.
 

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the "less patient yacht" could have come up behind the folk boat VERY SLOWLY and offered a tow. I hope he's still stuck in the mud.
 

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so sculling slowly now makes you have no steering or signaling capabilities or sailing abilities basically just a sitting duck?
 

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The rudder doesn't fall off when you being to scull. You can still steer.
 

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x2

actually you have 2 steering systems now! thats the neat thing about sculling...

its used a lot down here in central america on wooden canoes in shallow waters
 

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You don't suppose that the Folkboat with it's 3' draft is in the middle of the 20' deep channel, and that they have forced the overtaking boat (which draws 7', and which has been slogging behind them for two and a half hours), to try to pass them in a spot where they get stuck in a 5' deep mudbank? Maybe more like a dog in a manger than righteous comeuppance?
 

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folkboats dont have 3 draft they are almost 5...cheers
 

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You don't suppose that the Folkboat with it's 3' draft is in the middle of the 20' deep channel, and that they have forced the overtaking boat (which draws 7', and which has been slogging behind them for two and a half hours), to try to pass them in a spot where they get stuck in a 5' deep mudbank? Maybe more like a dog in a manger than righteous comeuppance?
So, Paul, how long did it take you to get off that mudbank, anyway?
:D
 
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