SailNet Community banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,957 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A moderate to strong La Niña weather event has developed in the Pacific Ocean, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
A La Niña event reduces wind shear, which is the change in winds between the surface and the upper levels of the atmosphere. This allows hurricanes to grow.
The hurricane season ends on 30 November and so far there have been 17 named storms of the 19-25 that were predicted by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
This is a good result, given that these days meteorologists are not able to predict the weather accurately. Atmospheric phenomena are too volatile. I think this is due to the current climate change. We do not really notice it, but the frequency of various natural phenomena and natural disasters has clearly changed if we take the dynamics around the world as a whole. Laura Edison Skyrora and others in the aerospace industry will probably agree that it is necessary to study the dynamics of climate change in detail and more accurately predict weather changes. And this requires a larger number of meteorological satellites in near-earth orbit.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,957 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is a good result, given that these days meteorologists are not able to predict the weather accurately. Atmospheric phenomena are too volatile. I think this is due to the current climate change. We do not really notice it, but the frequency of various natural phenomena and natural disasters has clearly changed if we take the dynamics around the world as a whole. Laura Edison of Skyrora and others in the aerospace industry will probably agree that it is necessary to study the dynamics of climate change in detail and more accurately predict weather changes. And this requires a larger number of meteorological satellites in near-earth orbit.
I believe it is more about people's perception of the hurricane season by dates, rather than the reality of the weather. When I first arrived in the Caribbean, the season ended on October 1st. For centuries the saying was; June, too soon, July, stand-by, August, come they must and September, remember. I remember one hit StT on November 7th and shocked us all.
Some years later, they extended the season through mid-November, and that was pretty late for the trip from Newport to Bermuda. Then they extended the season through the end of November, and I just said screw it. After a good look at what was happening out there (we now had satellite weather available to us directly, instead of relying on the forecasters) I went back to early October, after all, Bermuda is only 640 miles out.
However rare, there has been a hurricane or tropical storm in every month of the year in the past, so just because "the season" is over, it doesn't mean we can throw all caution to the wind. lol
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top