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Close call for sure. Makes you wonder about centerboarders and long ocean journeys.
Some of the incidents at sea - this one included.. Make me wonder.
Looks like many of these could have been avoided with better preventive maintenance.

Don't think many boats loosing rudder, mast or having other faults have taken stuff apart to inspect and repair..

It's easy to drop a rudder for inspection.
It's should be possible to drop a centreboard to inspect for corrosion and wear.
The rig should be inspected regularly by going aloft and using binoculars from deck.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Interesting indeed... although I'm not sure why they should be surprised to hear that a container ship has bags of cement on board, since quick-drying cement is exactly what the vast majority of the world's shipping use for plugging leaks themselves.
 

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Some of the incidents at sea - this one included.. Make me wonder.
Looks like many of these could have been avoided with better preventive maintenance.
Makes me wonder. Did you read the article at all?

The centerboard system on this boat had recently been refit/repaired. So, preventitive maint was done. I would say this points to a different problem of paying a great deal of money to a shipyard to repair your boat to find the repairs themselves are reason for a hull loss.

Even worse is the standard contract many yards have you sign that absolves them from responsibility for anything but the repair itself, not consequential loss AND waiving your right to subrogate through your insurance company, which is a violation of the policy itself, thus the owner pays.

Not to discount in any way your post and good common sense.
 

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Interesting indeed... although I'm not sure why they should be surprised to hear that a container ship has bags of cement on board, since quick-drying cement is exactly what the vast majority of the world's shipping use for plugging leaks themselves.
Not Filipinos?????????
 

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Makes me wonder. Did you read the article at all?
I did read all the blogs on this incident two months ago when they where published, but I had forgot the part about recent service.
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It was this post that triggered my comment
Close call for sure. Makes you wonder about centerboarders and long ocean journeys.
Every time their is a gear failure, these comments pop up.
Is boats built by XXX suitable?
Is spade rudders a liability?
Is bolt on keels a liability?
The list goes on and on and on...
Preventive maintenance is often not mentioned at all.
"If it's don't broke don't fix it" seems to be the preferred way...

The centerboard system on this boat had recently been refit/repaired. So, preventitive maint was done. I would say this points to a different problem of paying a great deal of money to a shipyard to repair your boat to find the repairs themselves are reason for a hull loss.

Even worse is the standard contract many yards have you sign that absolves them from responsibility for anything but the repair itself, not consequential loss AND waiving your right to subrogate through your insurance company, which is a violation of the policy itself, thus the owner pays.

Not to discount in any way your post and good common sense.
It will in many cases be almost impossible to point back to the yard to blame them.
It could be a design flaw
It could be triggered by something the gear was not designed for.
It could be the owner ignored advice from the yard..

It's for a reason commercial ships
1. Have inspectors at the yard during maintenance and repair
2. Often involve the classification society in QA on yard work
 
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