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Discussion Starter #1
The Bristol 41.1 is a beautiful boat, but I understand that they typically employ a centerboard. How does one raise/lower it? Are they maintenance-intensive?
 

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Normally the board has a wire that wraps onto a winch designed for this purpose.
We love our board and use it almost all the time to help with weather or lee helm. Even at anchor, it can dampen the motion in a rolly anchorage.
I think the biggest problem with a board, especially on a new boat and for those not used to them, is leaving it down when coming into shallow water. I made a little plaque that says "board down' in red on one side and 'board up' in white on the other, which has velcro and is right alongside the chart plotter at the helm. Can't-miss seeing it.
 

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Like anything else, they require maintenance. The board itself should be lowered, Sanded and Painted. ( maybe not needed annually but every few years) This would typically be done while in a lift. The Cable should be inspected and replaced as needed. Check for "fishhooks" etc. and Lubricate. Inspect the Pivot. Check the "Trunk" for marine growth and scrape out any Barnacles or shells.
 

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I have owned my 1968 B32 since 1970 and have replace the cable and sheaves twice. Last time was 4 years ago, I don't expect to have to do anything to it for the next 20 years, other than paint and cleaning the barnacles out of the trunk.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/52017206405/?ref=bookmarks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Normally the board has a wire that wraps onto a winch designed for this purpose.
We love our board and use it almost all the time to help with weather or lee helm. Even at anchor, it can dampen the motion in a rolly anchorage.
I think the biggest problem with a board, especially on a new boat and for those not used to them, is leaving it down when coming into shallow water. I made a little plaque that says "board down' in red on one side and 'board up' in white on the other, which has velcro and is right alongside the chart plotter at the helm. Can't-miss seeing it.
That's a good way to remind yourself!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm still thinking about the Bristol 41.1 (or 43.3) and the centerboard... I read somewhere an anecdote about the centerboard "banging" while underway. Has anyone experienced that; if yes, is there any way to correct that?
 

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Running downwind with the board up in a big sea, I heard the board knocking around in the trunk, when the boat rolled a bit.

In an rolly anchorage you might hear it, in that case lowering the board should help. I'm not racing, So, here in the Northeast, I find the pluses outweigh the minuses for me. I draw 3'11" with the board up, which allows easier access to more spots, at more times.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Running downwind with the board up in a big sea, I heard the board knocking around in the trunk, when the boat rolled a bit.

In an rolly anchorage you might hear it, in that case lowering the board should help. I'm not racing, So, here in the Northeast, I find the pluses outweigh the minuses for me. I draw 3'11" with the board up, which allows easier access to more spots, at more times.
With the board lowered, is there anything that "locks" it in place so it stays vertical? I had thought that the board was a "swing keel" with it's own ballast that would be heavy enough to keep the board full deployed even with water rushing past it, but I read something today that said it is literally a board (no ballast of its own). Are there perhaps two control lines - one keeping the board up and the other for keeping it extended? Sorry for all the questions... I don't know much about centerboards and have generally avoided them, but the Bristol 41.1 is such a fine looking boat that I keep coming back to it!
 

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We use our board frequently. It's heavily weighted and doesn't rattle at all. Lower it slowly.
Upwind it lets us sail a closer line to the wind.

Instead of reefing at 15-18 we usually can wait till 18-22.

To me it's a great advantage
 

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I wouldn't say that my board is heavily weighted. it's heavy enough though. The lateral resistance while under sail plus it's own weight is sufficient to keep it in place. You would only typically deploy it when the wind is on the beam or forward of it.

It cuts down on weather helm and leeway or drift and improves windward performance. I've owned two Centerboard boats, one a Bristol and My current a Sabre. As mentioned, the benefits far outweigh the negatives- For me. With 3'11" board up, I am sailing when many of my neighbors with deeper drafts are waiting for mid or high tide. I can sneak into skinny waters, cut corners of channels etc.

I think the 41.1 is 4'6" with the board up. Not bad for that size vessel!

If winds are light, 5-10 knots, It's usually not even necessary to lower the board. If you really like the boat, I wouldn't let the fact that it has a centerboard scare you away. I looked at a 41.1, I Loved it. I just thought it was just a little too much boat for me at the time, for what I needed. Not that I couldn't sail it. But when you pay for a slip and everything else by the foot, the extra 6 feet beyond my current 34, Sabre, runs into thousands more a year.
 

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Center boards require very little extra maintenance. The well and board need to be cleaned and painted when you do the bottom but that's minimal time and labor. The cable should be inspected at each haul out and replaced if necessary. The galvanized cable that the PO installed on my boat still looked good after 6 years mostly in Hawaii. Changed it out for a Dyneema line which is going on 7 years and possibly will last forever. The plumbing to run the control line needs to be monitored but my boat is 50 years old with everything but the cable is original.

I've got a Pearson 35 but most center board installations are essentially identical. How the lifting cable is actuated and located is the big difference. Different boats's interior and deck designs so builders have routed the lifting cables differently with different means to multiply force to raise the board. Some use a wire reel or sheet winch mounted either on deck or below. Others have a simple dual sheave arrangement to multiply force. I'm not familiar with any center board mechanics that lock the board down on a keel/centerboard boat. There may be some out there but I'd be leery of such a set up unless it is built hell for stout to be as strong as fixed keel. Personally want the board to lift up and save itself when it hits the bottom. So most boats just rely on the weight of the board to keep it lowered all the way at sea. Some may have minor weight ballast to be sure it stays down but in no way is it enough ballast that would affect stability. There are boats with ballasted lifting keels, either swing or vertical, but they are a whole different barrel of fish.

The board in the up position should have little to no bumping, banging. Sailed to Hawaii DDW with the board up with the rolling that that point of sail includes and the board was dead silent. The only time I was aware that the board was even there was when the lifting line slipped a little in the cam cleat and the board dropped down a bit. Hauled a bit on the lifting line and was back to silent running. Lowered, the board can bang. Beating, it seldom makes any noise. On a reach or run it does make itself known because of the additional rolling of the boat. But then I almost never lower the board except when hard on the wind because it's not necessary and just makes for additional drag. Some people say partially lowering the board on some points of sail can affect helm balance but haven't found that to be the case with my boat. Lowering the board at anchor with ANY wave action will result in the board bumping noticeably. Don't know why you'd want to lower the board at anchor in any case.
 

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Center boards require very little extra maintenance. The well and board need to be cleaned and painted when you do the bottom but that's minimal time and labor. The cable should be inspected at each haul out and replaced if necessary. The galvanized cable that the PO installed on my boat still looked good after 6 years mostly in Hawaii. Changed it out for a Dyneema line which is going on 7 years and possibly will last forever. The plumbing to run the control line needs to be monitored but my boat is 50 years old with everything but the cable is original.

I've got a Pearson 35 but most center board installations are essentially identical. How the lifting cable is actuated and located is the big difference. Different boats's interior and deck designs so builders have routed the lifting cables differently with different means to multiply force to raise the board. Some use a wire reel or sheet winch mounted either on deck or below. Others have a simple dual sheave arrangement to multiply force. I'm not familiar with any center board mechanics that lock the board down on a keel/centerboard boat. There may be some out there but I'd be leery of such a set up unless it is built hell for stout to be as strong as fixed keel. Personally want the board to lift up and save itself when it hits the bottom. So most boats just rely on the weight of the board to keep it lowered all the way at sea. Some may have minor weight ballast to be sure it stays down but in no way is it enough ballast that would affect stability. There are boats with ballasted lifting keels, either swing or vertical, but they are a whole different barrel of fish.

The board in the up position should have little to no bumping, banging. Sailed to Hawaii DDW with the board up with the rolling that that point of sail includes and the board was dead silent. The only time I was aware that the board was even there was when the lifting line slipped a little in the cam cleat and the board dropped down a bit. Hauled a bit on the lifting line and was back to silent running. Lowered, the board can bang. Beating, it seldom makes any noise. On a reach or run it does make itself known because of the additional rolling of the boat. But then I almost never lower the board except when hard on the wind because it's not necessary and just makes for additional drag. Some people say partially lowering the board on some points of sail can affect helm balance but haven't found that to be the case with my boat. Lowering the board at anchor with ANY wave action will result in the board bumping noticeably. Don't know why you'd want to lower the board at anchor in any case.
Wow, I have to disagree with just about all your impressions of a centerboard, but of course, we don't sail similar boats.
I've tested it time and time again under power, and there seems to be zero drag; we don't even lose a .10th of a knot with it down. As above, we almost always use it at various depths to balance the boat and slow the roll, even ddw. That yours causes you to roll more on a reach is unfathomable to me, as putting ours down has an amazing effect to dampen the roll. We can always tell if we have forgotten to put the board down because she rolls so much more, even at anchor. At anchor, on our boat, there is a sweet spot where it dampens the roll and doesn't bang.
I know of folks who have put garden hose cut in half lengthwise on the board above the part of the board that comes out of the boat, and others who have used a similar method at the opening and it has completely stopped the banging.
Of course, when one can increase their draft from 6' to over 10, that has a considerable effect on leeway when beating. But when we are sailing well, the current seems to have little added effect.
 

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Hi kbbarton, to answer your question, no there is no locking device. And there are 2 imbedded zinc weights about 6" round in the tail of the centerboard. The boards are made of plywood.

I have detailed plans of my board in this site. My sheave arrangement is different than anyone else's I have seen, but there is little change in the boards from model to model.

And you are correct, the Pearson line of boat centerboards are very similar to the Bristol line, seeing how both Clinton Person and Ted Hood both started at Pearson Yachts before starting the Bristol line.

https://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/108089-centerboard-repair-bristol-32-a.html

Any how, we have a large Bristol community in FaceBook and Yahoo, come find us!
 

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Sorry if I wasn't clear but didn't mean to intimate the board down caused rolling but that that point of sail did. Just that sailing off the wind=
especially DDW all boats roll more, some a lot more than others. Beause of the rolling, the board has constant reversal of the dynamic forces on the sides of the boards which cause it to bang. The board could reduce roll. Never occurred to lower the board DDW to reduce roll for two reasons, my boat doesn't roll badly so didn't feel the need and the banging board would drive me crazy. Other than beating haven't felt a need to lower the board. Even though I suffer from CHS, extraneous noise like an auto pilot when sailing bug the hell out of me.
Aloha
Peter Ogilvie
'Ae'a, Pearson 35 #108
Ms American Pie, Sabre 28 Mk II
 

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Sorry if I wasn't clear but didn't mean to intimate the board down caused rolling but that that point of sail did. Just that sailing off the wind=
especially DDW all boats roll more, some a lot more than others. Beause of the rolling, the board has constant reversal of the dynamic forces on the sides of the boards which cause it to bang. The board could reduce roll. Never occurred to lower the board DDW to reduce roll for two reasons, my boat doesn't roll badly so didn't feel the need and the banging board would drive me crazy. Other than beating haven't felt a need to lower the board. Even though I suffer from CHS, extraneous noise like an auto pilot when sailing bug the hell out of me.
Aloha
Peter Ogilvie
'Ae'a, Pearson 35 #108
Ms American Pie, Sabre 28 Mk II
Try different depths on the board. Ours will bang all the way down but not at all at 14 of 20 turns on the winch. That's still most of the way down. Mess about a bit and I think you'll be surprised. A centerboard need not be an all or nothing proposition.
 

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Try different depths on the board. Ours will bang all the way down but not at all at 14 of 20 turns on the winch. That's still most of the way down. Mess about a bit and I think you'll be surprised. A centerboard need not be an all or nothing proposition.
When the board is all the way down, it is the tightest fit, less movement. The boards are thickest at the pivot and 8" down from there, also they are flat at that point so when the board is all the way down the thick flat part will keep the board from rolling and is the tightest in the exiting slot of the trunk. With the board part down the board has more room to move in the slot. You can clearly see that in my plans documentation of the board.
 

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When the board is all the way down, it is the tightest fit, less movement. The boards are thickest at the pivot and 8" down from there, also they are flat at that point so when the board is all the way down the thick flat part will keep the board from rolling and is the tightest in the exiting slot of the trunk. With the board part down the board has more room to move in the slot. You can clearly see that in my plans documentation of the board.
I guess all boards are not created equal. But that makes little sense as a board is designed to operate at different depths for trim and partially down in shallower waters. As I said, I've known folks who have quieted their boards w/a split hose in the trunk or on the board.
Ours, unlike the other 530's we've met takes a forklift to move it if it is out of the boat. I'm guessing it weighs around 2500#.
 

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Forgive me, I thought we were talking about Bristol specific boat design in a Bristol thread? My mistake.
No, I'm sorry. I had no idea that the post was on any particular forum. I just saw it under recent discussions.
 
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