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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be replacing my chain plates soon. Probably go with 316 ss.

Just curious though what others are using now like Volvo around the world race boats, or what are the production boats using now. Are most using 316ss or any using titanium?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm replacing mine with titanium. Super traditional looking and now cheaper than good bronze.
I was also considering Titanium. One concern is that most material seems to come from China. Maybe that is ok, but Chinese sometimes have problems with quality control and counterfeit material.

Where did you get your titanium chain plates and what material do you use for the bolts?
 

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We used to have someone who posted here regularly that was in the TI business but I think he retired or got out. China seems to have its biggest quality gap with metals not meeting specs.
 

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Miata,

I was in the titanium business and left to go back to practicing law.


My impression then was that titanium was the way to go when I was working for a company selling it. And now that I am not I still think titanium hardware is the way to go. Compared to high quality 316 it is about three times stronger, about the same price, and completely immune to corrosion in normal usage. It really is just better.

As for sourcing... The China made stuff is actually being used by the U.S. military since american made titanium is frankly overpriced junk. There are a lot of reasons for it, but basically US manufacturers had a monopoly for 50 years and never made the improvements in quality that overseas suppliers did. The Chinese manufacturers however were required to since the same foundries that supply commercial metal supply their military, and the Chinese military don't accept poor quality stuff.

What I would recommend is using G5 (same as 6al4v) titanium. It's the strongest normal alloy, and pretty commonly available. Price wise expect to pay the same as for high autensic stainless or super alloy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Greg,
Is it ok to use 316 ss bolts with the titanium? I would replace the bolts probably every 5-10 years depending on inspection. How would you would you know when to replace the titanium chain plates? I assume the titanium would last a very long time, but maybe not "forever".
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I haven't yet, i'm sailing down to Port Townsend in about 60 days to have Brain Toss help me, I'm doing a funky design and want to make sure I calculated it right. I'm sure you can find a good local fabricator.
I talked with Brian maybe a year ago. He likes Titanium, at least he did then.
 

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Greg,
Is it ok to use 316 ss bolts with the titanium? I would replace the bolts probably every 5-10 years depending on inspection. How would you would you know when to replace the titanium chain plates? I assume the titanium would last a very long time, but maybe not "forever".
It would be my guess that titanium will last longer than SS316 given that corrosion is the culprit that causes failures. Your boat is what 34 years old. How old will you be in 34 years and will you still be sailing that boat?
Your only issues will be milling and drilling.
Good luck,
John
 

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I haven't yet, i'm sailing down to Port Townsend in about 60 days to have Brain Toss help me, I'm doing a funky design and want to make sure I calculated it right. I'm sure you can find a good local fabricator.
I visited the port townsend foundry and was not only impressed at their knowledge but their prices. Give them a visit while you're down there. They do amazing things with bronze.

Med
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It would be my guess that titanium will last longer than SS316 given that corrosion is the culprit that causes failures. Your boat is what 34 years old. How old will you be in 34 years and will you still be sailing that boat?
Your only issues will be milling and drilling.
Good luck,
John
I will be old in 34 years, and hopefully on my 4th circum-navigation. As far as milling and drilling, based on what I have read about titanium, I would let a shop handle that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh, and 316ss and titanium are right next to each other on the galvanic series of metals so should have no problem used to gather. But since rust is still the culprit, why not use TI nuts and bolts too?
John
I would choose 316 ss (THE- South Korean made) bolts mainly based on cost, and the questionable quality of a nut and bolt made in China. The 316 could be changed out easily one at a time and at a very low cost- even doing every 5 years would be an inexpensive and easy job on my boat.
 

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I visited the port townsend foundry and was not only impressed at their knowledge but their prices. Give them a visit while you're down there. They do amazing things with bronze.

Med
They are about to pour me a custom bow roller:)
 

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So guys, where would I get chainplates for my 1977 Union Polaris 36?

I will need 3 each side.

I can re-use the stainless backing plates (outboard) and the big stainless bolts, but where would I get the new titanium chainplates manufactured?

Thanks
 

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Not sure about that... using 316 SS with Ti is probably not prudent... will last some time till the 316 corrodes but why when Ti washers/nuts/bolts exist so keep everything noble?

View attachment 42297
Also, even if they are not causing electrolysis or galvanic issues, the SS bolts, when not exposed to oxygen are subject to crevice corrosion, and titanium is not.

MedSailor
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Not sure about that... using 316 SS with Ti is probably not prudent... will last some time till the 316 corrodes but why when Ti washers/nuts/bolts exist so keep everything noble?

View attachment 42297
Titanium nuts and bolts and washers are super expensive- I would guess due to the high machining cost and also low demand. Stainless 316 are relatively ultra cheap. My bolts are all internal to the hull and would only get crevice corrosion if there were a deck leak. The fact that I could change out the bolts easily and cheaply even every 5 years would virtually eliminate corrosion problems with stainless bolts- that and the fact I do not really trust Chinese bolts- and that is where most titanium bolts are coming from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
So guys, where would I get chainplates for my 1977 Union Polaris 36?

I will need 3 each side.

I can re-use the stainless backing plates (outboard) and the big stainless bolts, but where would I get the new titanium chainplates manufactured?

Thanks
You can try Allied Titanium.
http://www.alliedtitanium.com/products/marine/rigging-parts/chainplates/vupdc_Results.php

http://www.alliedtitanium.com/
I also just put a post on Brion Toss' web site (spar talk) asking the same question.
 
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