SailNet Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
1981 Endeavour 32
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I've been worrying about seeing some rust on the outside of the hull where the aft lower chainplate is....here's a pic from the outside.


There's some rust at the bolt heads, right, but that little spot between and just below the line of the bolts is a chunk of metal that is sticking through the outside of the hull. Odd. Really odd, as the chainplate inside should be an angle with a flat face against the hull. WTF?

So, being inquisitive and having a Sunday morning at my disposal I decide the have a little look-see inside and explore this little mystery. I remove the trim inside the cabin above the settee to expose the chainplate from the inside, and this is what I find:


Again, WTF.....the chainplate inside the boat is half-covered with a layer of glass and what looks like a severe globulation of 5200. Why in the world would these be covered like this on the inside of the boat?

After cutting back the glass and cutting, pulling, and cussin' for 30 minutes the chainplate is starting to appear:



After another 30 minutes it's clear, and there's no sign of the little metal chunk sticking through from the outside. And the chainplate looks pretty good. Don't like the rust on that one bolt-head, though.



Guess it's time to take a stab at exposing the rest and see what condition they are in. Here's the starboard upper, after an hour's worth of work exposing it:


This one doesn't look so good.

Guess it's time for new chainplates all around - do it now and do them all, right?

The good news is the starboard forward lower chainplate has to be accessed from inside the hanging locker, so it oughta be a blast folding myself into there to pull all that crapola off.

Ahhhh, the pleasures of boat ownership!

I'll be hauling the boat in a few weeks for a bottom job, so I guess it will be a good idea to pull the mast and replace all 6 chainplates. The standing rigging is only 6 years old but will get a rigger to check it out.

I'm pretty ignorant of rigging issues.....any suggestions from the group on what to look out for when replacing these chainplates and having the rigging once-overed?
 

·
Daniel - Norsea 27
Joined
·
1,258 Posts
Don't forget to repeatedly tell yourself

"I like my boat, I like my boat..." :D

Since the exposed surfaces look ok, it would be interesting to see what's going on with the areas you can't see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
Yes for sure get a rigger . But really the inside of the nut and bolt looks good , but then I'm looking at a pic. You say the standing rig is 6yrs. old ? I my opinion it's not time to replace , but again it's up to you and the rigger . If it were me I would back out those screws and nuts and replace them , one at a time so you don't have to pull the mast . Then you can get the chain plates off and inspect . That piece of fiberglass mat in the first pic looked pretty scary .
 

·
Registered
1981 Endeavour 32
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Definitely time for some expert rigging advice! I've exposed 4 of the 6 and so far only one chai plate looks sketchy, but after 33 years I would suspect the stainless May have gotten stressed, at least where the shroud tangs attach.

Probably gonna have to liberate some Benjamin's on this before it's all over.
 

·
Sailor
Joined
·
929 Posts
I'm thinking the 5200 is evidence of a prev. Owners attempt to deal with a leak. I wouldn't be surprised if there was significant corrosion under the chain plate, between the glass. I would remove the plates and see what's happening there. At least where you are seeing the rust.

Have you tried to get the rust stain off? Could be dripping from a bolt and running down the hull a bit?

Just some guesses.

Tod


Mandolin, Bayfield 36 out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
the goop is laziness

remember never seal chainplates from below...from above only that way when you see a leak you can fix it and know where to fix

for your plates
remove nuts and bolts, clean and bufff if you will...then pot holes with resin, drill, then put together again with correctly applied sealant

simple
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
these are some custom new chainplates I had made btw...your knee joint plates are easy easy easy to seal up well

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,067 Posts
I'm thinking the 5200 is evidence of a prev. Owners attempt to deal with a leak. I wouldn't be surprised if there was significant corrosion under the chain plate, between the glass. I would remove the plates and see what's happening there. At least where you are seeing the rust.

Have you tried to get the rust stain off? Could be dripping from a bolt and running down the hull a bit?
Agree totally. Any evidence of 'rust' on stainless chainplates is an obvious cause for concern. Rust on chainplates (and its bolting) 'may' be due to crevice corrosion and simultaneous fatigue cracking or a combo of BOTH.
Best bet is to remove them and take the parts to an automotive 'machine shop' or a machine shop who specializes in 'stainless steel fabrication' ... and who does MAGNAFLUX testing. Such testing will better 'show' the presence of cracking due to fatigue AND/OR crevice corrosion.
 

·
Registered
1981 Endeavour 32
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for the replies, everybody. I'll definitely pull the chainplates off and have them inspected. Since they are over 30 years old it is probably a good idea to have the machine shop make new ones anyway......

The sealant covering them still puzzles me. It is definitely there from the original build - it's the same stuff that is in the hull to deck joint and in some places it looks like some of the sealant that oozed out of the deck joint got smushed onto the chainplates and stanchion backing plates.

Weird.

Maybe the day my boat was built they had a new guy using the caulk gun?

PS - nice work on the new chainplates of yours, Christian!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,092 Posts
Agree totally. Any evidence of 'rust' on stainless chainplates is an obvious cause for concern. Rust on chainplates (and its bolting) 'may' be due to crevice corrosion and simultaneous fatigue cracking or a combo of BOTH.
Best bet is to remove them and take the parts to an automotive 'machine shop' or a machine shop who specializes in 'stainless steel fabrication' ... and who does MAGNAFLUX testing. Such testing will better 'show' the presence of cracking due to fatigue AND/OR crevice corrosion.
dye penetrant testing is a better choice for 300 series stainless. Mangaflux does not work as the 300 stainless because it is not magnetic.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
the ring a bell trick works too bu suspending the plate on a wire(works better on longer plates)

if it rings true by tapping it everywhere you are fine

if there is a thump or dud dead sound smack the plate on the floor and wacth it crumble and break right nefore your eyes...

even if it looks fine on the outside
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top