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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I am thinking of getting a new forestay chainplate for my Albin Vega 27 (a known weak spot on these boats).

Can anyone recommend a source for these?

If I need to have one fabricated, can you recommend a quality rigging company (have read some bad stories on here about faulty fabricators)?

Thanks,
groundhog
 

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Telstar 28
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I wouldn't have a rigging shop fabricate it... I'd have a metal working shop fabricate it... much cheaper and probably what most rigging shops are going to do, so you'll have one less markup on the price. Can you post a photo of the old one, so we can see what it looks like. A lot of this depends on how complex the piece is.
 

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Some rigging shops do have metal fabrication capabilities, and while you could go to a generalist metal shop, the rigger will likely have a better sense of the requirements for the finished piece. I have used Chesapeake Rigging in Annapolis to fabricate new chainplates and and a new stem fitting for my boat. I have been generally impressed with their work.

I used a local welder to make up some new special bases for my stern pulpit that double as the mounting points for some turning blocks; while the latter pieces are OK, the finish was not polished at all, and I suspect there may be some weak spots that could be prone to crevice corrosion in the future...
 

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Itz That Eazy!!!
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Try eMachineShop.com

I saw in an older post (not sure which site) about a website that lets you to design your own part or use one of their templates. They have their own CAD you download to design the part on. It seemed like a good deal so I gave it a shot.

The site is Online Machine Shop - Instant Pricing. I have used the program and it seems to be what you need if you are like me and enjoy building your own stuff. I designed a couple of backing plates for my chainplates using their CAD program with pretty good results :D. It allowed me to select the type of material it would be made from and the finish (Polished, brushed, plated...) Once you complete your design and select the materials, the program inspects your drawing for completeness and provides you with the actual cost to manufacture the part. The price was acceptable for a fabricated part and I got exactly what I needed. A cost saving tip: Put multiple parts on the same drawing. Then it becomes one job instead of multiple jobs. I discovered this with my backing plates. Saved me almost $200 ;) .

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 
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