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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I did some research befor posting this: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/46528-bulkhead-repair-ive-put-off-long-enough.html

Looks similar to my situation. I always thought the warped veneer was more or less cosmetic when I bought the boat but it turns out to be more of a structural nature.

We went out on Saturday and had a great time sailing. Winds gusting to 18, we really enjoyed the power. But when we got back in this is what I noticed:

Chainplate on the port side pulled up through the deck about an inch:



below, even worse news:





from the head side:


the starboard side is begining to look supect too:






I think I'm out of the sailing business for the season. I'm in Tennessee were the sailing community is very small. Repair by a professional will be expensive and won't happen very soon due to thier backup.

sigh, I really love this boat:



Just looking for a little pity, and maybe some advice.

Thanks,
CB
 

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looks like many years of the chain plate leaking, and then the bulk head delaminating. you right it wont be fast and it wont be cheap, as the bulk heads need to be replaced, maybe made stronger when replaced.

my first suggestion get it on the land and get the mast off of it, asap.

you might be able to save some money on the repair by you removing everything bolted to the bulkhead. if you can get it down to just the bulkhead it would be much cheaper for some one else to do the precision work
 

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Are even a little handy with tools? Have you considered replacing the bulkhead yourself? A few hours researching this on Google may give you lots in info on how to go about doing this. You can also start reading posts (and join) the The Plastic Classic Forum • Index page for more advice. This isn't rocket science, just hard work and a few measuring tricks. Even the materials won't be too bad. Just because you are inexperienced with this, doesn't mean you can't fix this to be stronger than new, just that it might not look as nice as someone with experience (and will take you longer).

You can always just aim to get back together so it's structurally strong, sail the rest of the season, and go back to the finish work and trim at the end of the season.
 

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I agree with preservedkillick. I'd look at repairing it myself and the Plastic Classic Forum is the place to ask how. Worse comes to worse you can remove everything and if you get stuck call in a pro. I'd guess a pro would charge 2-3k to do from start to finish. Good luck.
Brian
 

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What preservedkillick said.

You do need to get the mast down, before that chainplate gives up and it comes down on its own. Pull out the bulkheads on either side and use them as templates for new ones.

Btw: Something's missing on the topside of that chainplate that's pulled out. Look and you'll notice the imprint of something that used to be there. Don't know when or why it was done, but it looks like the original chainplate was replaced with something else. What's there now cannot be adequately sealed against moisture intrusion, IMO.

Jim
 

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Semijim is right. Looks like the small plate that goes over the sealant maybe.
Brian
 

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This is not as uncommon as one would think. Two weeks ago a friend took his Raider 33 out for a sail and several hours later I get a call, he just lost his rig and snapped the mast at the lower spreader, could I come and help! The whole chain plate pulled completely out of the bulkhead and through the deck . With the port upper head shrould dangling in the wind the mast lasted about two seconds. Luckily no one was hurt. Could have fixed that easier and cheaper if he dhad just attended to it when the leak and delamination were first pointed out to him . (I work on boats for a living and tried to get him to look into getting it fixed quite a while ago) At least you did not have to loose your rig over this. Rightg now, your repair work is not too bad to do, but take the advice given by others and get the rig off or atleast do somthing to secure that shrould and protect your mast, Rick
 

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When you take that chainplate out I would make the hole through the deck BIGGER not to tight. Then leave the stupid stainless plate off, that shears the seal right off the chainplate! I'd make it about a 3/8" gap all the way around the chainplate. When you are all done you want put some putty around the bottom of the chainplate, then fill the gap between the chainplate and deck and a little higher so water runs off. This large gap filled with sealant will be aqble to flex without breaking the seal. It will likely go many years then with no leaks. Boats, decks, hulls, chainplates all move, and you have to allow them to. Otherwise nothing stays sealed.

Gary H. Lucas
 

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Ewww boy. Not difficult but that bulkhead will need replacing.

As Gary mentioned - I have opened up and rebedded chain plates to great success using a 1/4" carbide burr on a Dremel tool to create a moat around the chainplate at the deck (only 1/4" deep - not completely through the deck). Then use Boat-Life Primer on the metal to get a good adhesion and fill the moat with caulk (use modeling clay packed from below/inside to keep the caulk from running down into the ceiling & liner). This makes a good-sized caulk doughnut ring all around the chainplate at the deck level.

In your case I would also check the deck around the chainplate for core rot and dig that out while you're down for repairs. Looks like a long-term insidious water intrusion had it's way through that route.

Good luck,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Are even a little handy with tools? Have you considered replacing the bulkhead yourself? A few hours researching this on Google may give you lots in info on how to go about doing this. You can also start reading posts (and join) the The Plastic Classic Forum • Index page for more advice. This isn't rocket science, just hard work and a few measuring tricks. Even the materials won't be too bad. Just because you are inexperienced with this, doesn't mean you can't fix this to be stronger than new, just that it might not look as nice as someone with experience (and will take you longer).

You can always just aim to get back together so it's structurally strong, sail the rest of the season, and go back to the finish work and trim at the end of the season.
I actually am quite handy with tools, but don't need a project at the moment. I'm in the middle of remodeling the kitchen, putting down hardwood floors, raising the laundry room floor....etc.

The real unfortunate thing is that the boat is for sale! I put it up on the blocks last week. We made an offer on a Catalina 30 that was accepted yesterday. Fortunately I don't need to sell her to buy the Catalina. But now I'm wondering if I just discount the price to cover the damage, have someone fix it, or wait until this winter and do it myself. I'm confident the mast will remain sturdy, I have taken the main halyard and secured it to support that side.
 

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I replaced a similar bulkhead on my Catalina 27. It wasn't in is as bad shape as yours-I used the old one as a template to cut a new bulkhead out of marine plywood in the original thickness, I think 1/2". It took a couple of trips back and forth between the boat and my garage to trim it to size/shape, and then I bolted it in place.

I did it with the mast up, with a couple of halyards run to the stanchions on the affected side to provide support as the upper shroud was removed. But from what I've read, the lowers, (which have their separate chainplates), would have provided adequate mast support dockside.
 

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It ain't rocket science but it CAN be a flaming witch to replace a bulkhead. Any competent carpenter can do the basic work, and there are folks like West Systems who have guides online & will gladly assist you.

The real killer is removing all the stuff that is tied into the bulkhead (furniture, cabinetry, hull liner etc.) without destroying too much of it. That again is something a cabinet maker more than a simple carpenter might be more familiar with. Expect that as any trim or bordering material is removed, there may be several more inches of concealed damage.

And if you can salvage most of the bulkhead intact, that helps you to start making a full-size template on foamcore or corrugated cardboard for the new one.

Not necessarily a killer expensive job--but one that does require a LOT of time if you don't job it out.

Good luck with that!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the advice. I talked to a tech on his way out to look at the boat yesterday. He had already seen the pictures. He said it would be around 10 hours of labor for him to do (at 70 an hour for labor), and then materials. So I'm guessing for a professional it will be aroun 1500. I'm encouraged that many of you have done this on your own. I will post when and how the damage will be repaired.

cb
 

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Another look at your pics indicates your lowers fasten to the same chain plate as your uppers, so naturally you'll want to support the mast on that side with halyards run to the stanchions.
I hope it goes smoothly!
 

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What are you asking for the boat? If $1500 to have a professional repair the bulkhead is a small % of the price, then I would have it fixed. You would probably have to discount your asking price a lot more than $1500 with that type of damage.

I would say fix it yourself, but as you do not intend to keep her - and have a new boat in the works - I know I wouldn't have the proper motivation to get the job done quickly or correctly.

I used to flip houses (before the market crashed) and I know, for myself, that I had boundless motivation when I thought I would make a lot of money on the project or it was for my own enjoyment. Spending even an hour on a house that I knew wasn't going to make me any money, just so I could get rid of it and cut my losses, was pure torture.

Pay someone to do it and sell the boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
What are you asking for the boat? If $1500 to have a professional repair the bulkhead is a small % of the price, then I would have it fixed. You would probably have to discount your asking price a lot more than $1500 with that type of damage.

I would say fix it yourself, but as you do not intend to keep her - and have a new boat in the works - I know I wouldn't have the proper motivation to get the job done quickly or correctly.

I used to flip houses (before the market crashed) and I know, for myself, that I had boundless motivation when I thought I would make a lot of money on the project or it was for my own enjoyment. Spending even an hour on a house that I knew wasn't going to make me any money, just so I could get rid of it and cut my losses, was pure torture.

Pay someone to do it and sell the boat.
Before the damage I was asking $6,300. That is what I had in it. Now I would take $4,300 or maybe $4,000. We just had a survey done on a Catalina 30 yesterday.
 
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