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So admitting that there are no absolutes and what I am writing about will NOT be right for everyone, I being a trailer sailor came upon an epiphany when I read the book that recounted the trans-Atlantic sail of Robert Manry. Robert made the epic crossing in a small wooden boat (about 12 feet) he had modified with the smallest possible cabin. Some call it a quest, but the man's success and seamanship speak for itself. Disregarding the comfort factor and only regarding the successful completion of the voyage, I would like to read arguments about his logic and entertain contrary views to his recorded success. His logic was that a heavy keel was equal to a weighted coffin should a mishap occur. To the contrary, his wooden boat and wooden dagger board could be broken to pieces and would still, in it's individuality float onward. Just like a sea bird that bobs over the steepest waves. Robert died of a heart attack at a very early age and I thank the Lord that he realized his dream and succeeded in an attempt that others(myself included) will only have the nerve to dream about. I think Roberts journey and success speaks to the heart of my dream, to sail as far as I want while not losing family, wife and home that do not share my dream.
Thank you for reading and sharing my silliness.
 

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Yes, the world needs the extremes... The savants that create new boundaries that most of us will never test.

When it comes to sailing, if you have a spouse that shares your dreams, it is nice, but if not, you have to define your common goals and make it work. I'm sure many weekend sailors have done just that.
 

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Barquito
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One problem I see with the 'cork on the sea' theory, is that without the righting moment of the keel you will be thrown all over the place, possibly being capsized, rolled, etc. At some point the boat will start breaking up. At this point, you will not sink with positive buoyancy, but if you are exposed to the elements you will be suffering, or dead before rescue.
 

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I once had the same theory whats all this extra lead in my bilge needed for it will just slow me down,so I took it out,next time out sailing got hit by a gust and the mast head was in the water it took a couple of minutes to self right,not a fun experience.So the lead went back in it could have been serious if I was further out to sea.Ballast is there for a reason leave it there.
 
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