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Another possible use of the boom block and cleat that you show is for an adjustable outhaul on the main. I have a Challenger 15, #295 and I installed a turning block and cleat similar to what your picture shows. The Challenger 15 was originally configured for roller reefing of the main. If the gooseneck on your boom is spring loaded and will allow the boom to turn while connected to the mast, you have this type of reefing arrangement. My mainsail doesn't have any reefing points, so I question whether or not that's the purpose of the block and cleat on your boom. That being said, I haven't figured out how to roller reef the main with the mainsheet led to a block on the centerboard trunk.
 

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Hey Chad: Just wondering how it was going with your "new" boat? I got out yesterday in my Challenger, the first time in a while. The TV forecast was for winds from 20-30 mph, which was a bit of an exaggeration though it got rough at times. I mostly sailed with a reefed main and small jib, but at times it was only the reefed main. Later conditions moderated and I had the full main up with a small jib. Around here it seems the only time the wind blows is when a weather front is coming through. All in all, a pretty good day to sail.
 

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Responding to "Spray"


I have a Challenger 15 in the water out-front. If a photo would help you I can send one to I-pad

Jim Northern Michigan
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Hey Chad: Just wondering how it was going with your "new" boat? I got out yesterday in my Challenger, the first time in a while. The TV forecast was for winds from 20-30 mph, which was a bit of an exaggeration though it got rough at times. I mostly sailed with a reefed main and small jib, but at times it was only the reefed main. Later conditions moderated and I had the full main up with a small jib. Around here it seems the only time the wind blows is when a weather front is coming through. All in all, a pretty good day to sail.
Hi Tom,
Sorry for the extended delay. I was out sailing a fair amount and then hunting season came on. Then, I thought I had set up an email notification for any responses to any of my posts, but I never received any. Then had some computer problems and lost the name of this forum! Whew, with all of the alibi's out of the way....

The boat has been great to me. I waxed and stored it away a few months ago, but am already thinking about the Spring. The roughest wind I've had it out in was about 20 with gusts to 25. After puttering around on the mountain lakes like I had been, with winds barely 5-10, it was awesome! I had a full main and jib. However, I did notice the housing for my keel was spreading apart a little more than I'd like to see, when tacking. But otherwise, the performance has assuaged any regrets I had about purchasing.

I'm curious, for reefing your main, did you use the tell-tales to just tie around the boom at the desired level? Also, how did you take in some of your jib? If I may also ask about your setup based on your uploaded photographs;...
What is the secondary line coming off of the bracket you hook in the jib? It looks like it's going to the mast?

What is the line that comes out of your "cabin" area and goes through the same jib bracket mentioned above?

What is the line running down off of that same bracket, down around the starboard side?

Again, I'm terribly sorry for the ridiculous delay. I promise I'll be more responsive! Also, just wanted to again say what an awesome resource this is. I would have never found any other Challenger owners without this!

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Also, I wanted to thank you for uploading the awesome photos! Granted, it's my first sailboat, but the Challenger just looks sweet and yours is no exception.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Responding to "Spray"


I have a Challenger 15 in the water out-front. If a photo would help you I can send one to I-pad

Jim Northern Michigan
Hi Jim,
Thank you so much for the offer and the first warm-weather day you have, I'd love to see a bunch of photos of your Challenger. I am still very new and am very curious to see other people's setup. However, I don't want you to now venture out into that icy/snowy abyss that Northern Michigan must be right now :)

Chad
 

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Hi Chad,

I will be happy to send some photos of my Chalenger 15 when I get it back in the water in May. In the meantime I'm cutting holes in the ice to get some yelow perch for dinner.

I bought my Chalenger over 35 years ago. It was sitting neglected in a barnyard and was sun bleached but still very solid.

I was told that this particular one was raced by the Leon Irish family, and that it had extra features. I have never seen another one, so I have no details.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #31
No problem Jim! We're experiencing single digit temperatures here on the Northeast, so I can't imagine how frigid it is up there for you. Good luck with the Perch though--that's some dedicated fishing!

Even if the boat doesn't look good, it seems there isn't much that could make it unusable, short of a puncture in the fiberglass. Sounds like it has a good story for character too. Very cool, can't wait to see the pics.

Chad
 

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Folks, I bringing back a dead thread. I just brought a Challenger 15 sailboat as discussed in this thread. It looks the same as the pictures posted in this thread-but mine is a pretty pink! I am brand new to sailing and need some help with this boat. I posted this question else where but my first question is-- there are 2 holes in the bottom back transom. Are these drain holes which should be plugged or are they scudders?? which should not be plugged??
I also am apparently missing some type of line which is used to hold the boom when the sail is not raised (topping lift?). How do I rig this and with what- a rope or some type of wire? Excuse my ignorance-but I am new to this and learning.
Thanks.
J
 

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Marsman,

Congratulations on your purchase of a Challenger 15. They are a fun boat, especially if you are new to sailing. In answer to your two questions: the holes in the back of the transom may have been drilled by a previous owner to serve as drains. I put one in my boat and plugged it with a plastic threaded plug to use as a drain when washing the boat or emptying rain water. I keep it plugged when sailing and bail with a large sponge if necessary. The line to hold the boom up when the mainsail isn't attached is called a topping lift and runs from the top of the mast to the end of the boom. There are a couple ways to approach this. First is to install a line at the top of the boom with a spring loaded shackle on the other end to attach to the boom. This works fine when you're not sailing, but has to be detached when you raise the mainsail and then fastened somewhere on the mast to keep it from fouling other lines. The second approach, the one I use, is to use your main halyard to hold the boom up when you aren't sailing. I just fasten the shackle that goes to the headboard of the mainsail to the loop at the end of the boom and raise it to the desired height. This eliminates the additional line and helps keep your lines organized. I'll see if I can find a couple pictures to attach for your reference.
Let me know if you have any other questions.
Terry
 

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Mars, as Terry said, plug in the drainage holes when sailing and take a small bucket with you for bailing. I use a scoop made from a large juice jug (I cut the top to make the hole bigger and keep the handle intact).
When not sailing, I take the boom home with the sail, so no need for a topping lift.
Looks like a fun boat. Happy sailing! :)
 

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Terry and Kriss thanks for input. Terry I am really glad you responded to my restarting of a zombie thread and especially thanks for the pictures!!!! I just bought this sailboat, and I am brand new to sailing. I was getting a little worried because I was finding very little on the internet about this particular boat. The prior owner I believe had never actually sailed it. I have specific questions about it, and I am very happy that someone who has this sailboat responded!!
First your sailboat looks like it is much better -excellent shape -than mine. Mine doesn't look too bad(functional), but yours looks brand new and is very nice looking! It looks the two mystery holes must be some type of drain holes which I will need to plug up (someone else mentioned they might be scupper holes but I am going to plug them before I take it in the water since you don't have them). Second your helping me solve the topping lift problem.
I have follow up questions. 1)When you attach the main halyard to the boom for support, what is your process for rigging and raising the mainsail. In other words, do you have specific steps you use to get the mainsail on prior to removing it from the boom and attaching to the head of the mainsail??
2)If I decide to go with a topping lift, what type of line would you use and where would you attach it to the mast. I looked at the top of the mast and I saw a small hole. Would your run some type of wire through this small hole down to the end of the boom with a spring loaded shackle? I don't see where I could attach rope(line) to the top of the mast if I went with rope. Do you know if could do this with rope. Thanks for any input -I really appreciate it!!!


Jay
 

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No great mystery about raising main sail.
1. Unhook the halyard from the boom's end. Let the boom rest in the cockpit
2. Attach the halyard to the head of the sail
3. Feed the sail into the track on the mast (sail may have slugs or just rope along the luff
4. Raise the sail almost to the top. Cleat the halyard to keep sail in position.
5. Attach the sail to the boom starting with the tack. Sail's foot may be let free or fed into the track on the boom. Pull the clew fairly tight with the outhaul, making sure the sail is fully stretched.
6. Hook up the downhaul on the tack end of the boom, making sure that the sail (and boom) is properly positioned on the mast - not too low and not too high, giving you enough visibility under the sail and room over your head. Swinging boom can whack you silly if you are not careful.
7. Finish raising the sail as high and tight as you can. Cleat off the halyard.
8. Attach the main sheet to the boom using proper blocks and loop.
 

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Jay,
When I first got my boat there was a small diameter line, 3/16", tied through the small hole at the top of the mast and then attached to the boom. I eventually took it off because I found it more of a hinderance than a help. Your suggested method would work fine too.
Kriss responded with the procedure to raise the main. I start by attaching the main to the boom first and then to the mast. Some places that I've sailed required powering out a channel to get to the lake or bay to sail. Usually you can't do this with the main already raised unless you're leading a charmed life. The wind never seems to come from the right direction. I use a Minnkota electric trolling motor to power out onto the lake and then raise the main and jib once I'm on the water. Hope this is helpful. Keep your questions coming. Where are you sailing that you can be playing with boats this time of year?
Terry
 

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Terry
Thanks again-very helpful!! I am in Virginia and the only sailing I am doing now is in my backyard with my imagination. :D I want to get everything straight on this sailboat which I purchased last week before warm weather occurs. I am almost finished with the Sailing for dummies book- but have almost no practical experience-just a one day course. I want to try to set this boat up this weekend using your pictures as a guide-weather permitting. I am sure I will have questions. I will try to post a picture of my new purchase this weekend also.
What type and size electric motor are you using & battery setup? I want to go this route in case I get stuck on a lake with no wind & my kids and I need to get home. Will your setup move you around for a while if needed if you have no wind? Thanks
Jay
 

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Jay,
I bought a Minnkota Riptide Transom 55 with a 36" shaft. You can check it out on the Minnkota website. It's powered by a 12V marine battery and it will take you anywhere you want to go for a couple hours before the battery needs to be recharged. You need to purchase a motor mount separately in order to mount the motor on the transom. You can see the mount adaptor plate on the left side of the transom. I'll attach a couple more pictures of the installation. I don't have the ordering information for the motor mount immediately at hand, but can get it for you when I get back to my home office in a couple weeks.
Terry
 

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Terry:
Thanks again for all your help!!! You have helped me out a bunch!
The weather is once again not cooperating for me to set up my sailboat. Fortunately, my sailboat came with a motor mount- but not even close to as nice what you have- but hopefully it will work - once I attach it. Are those original sails to your boat?
Jay
 
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