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Discussion Starter #1
This season, I winterized the engine on my S2 11.0 myself for the first time. The Universal manual says the engine holds 5.6 quarts of oil. In using the pump (foot siphon pump) extractor attached to the dipstick, slightly more than three quarts came out. I know the marina did not use the drain plug/oil pan because it is too difficult to get to. I ran the engine for about 20 minutes prior to changing the oil -- putting slightly more than the 3 quarts back in.

Why couldn't I extract all of the oil? What should I have done differently?
 

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I changed the oil on my 5424 last month, and it definitely took about 5.6 quarts. However, on my engine, someone has attached a pipe to the sump drain plug, with a brass fitting on the end. I don't know if this pipe was original equipment, or an accessory.

Anyway, what I do is warm up the oil and then insert the plastic pipe for my electric oil change pump, right up the pipe attached to the sump plug. This works great. Still, my little electric pump takes about 10 minutes to drain all the oil.

It seems the problem is that your pipe is not going all the way to the bottom of the sump (obviously!)
 

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Some of it was in the filter, not enough to account for the difference. The intake hose on your dipstick pump is probably not located at the bottom of the oil pan. West Marine sells an effective oil change pump.
 

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Tartan 37
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This sounds fairly normal for extracting oil from a dipstick hole or oil fill.
I'm sure your engine is tilted down towards the stern where the shaft exits the boat. This creates a low point or reservoir where the oil collects. When you extract the oil from a spot above the low point you will only get slightly more than half the oil. If you extract the oil from the sump drain plug you will get 99% of the oil.
If you can't use the sump drain plug then multiple oil changes should be considered to get most of the old oil out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to each of you. Yes, my enine is slanted. I will chane the oil again in the Spring, and get the kit to attach to my drainage plug. Otherwise, I was happy with the West Marine manual pump, so I won't order a different one. Thanks for the quick responses.
 

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Im interested
They REALLY work well. Even if I had a Beta that on-engine pump would come off and I'd use the Moeller. Having used the Beta pumps I think T37Chef is crazy to get rid of the Moeller.


Oh and before anyone comments on that engine, as they always do, YES she had about 2900 hours on her when that video was shot..... Engines don't have to look like crap even at close to 3000 hours........:D
 

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Well now that you say that MS I may have to wait at least until I try the one on the engine first!

Funny you mention the age of the engine, that is insane, looks better than new!
 

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I have the same problem, due to slanting of the main engine. There is always a couple of quarts remaining. Pulling oil out of the dipstick tube on the genset, seems to get every drop.

I have been very reluctant to install a permanent drain tube kit on the plug at the bottom of the pan, but I'm tempted. It just seems like a nervous point of failure that could put all the oil into the bilge while underway. Maybe I'm over reacting.

However, I've recently read in Volvo literature that the turbo is very susceptible to problems from dirty engine oil and I'm having problems. I think I need a better way to get it all out and be able to do so more often.

Anyone have any other suggestions for a way to get it all out?
 

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Well now that you say that MS I may have to wait at least until I try the one on the engine first!

Funny you mention the age of the engine, that is insane, looks better than new!
Don't get me wrong, they work. They are just extremely slow and never seem to be in a location where pumping it is easy. They are usually good for a shoulder cramp and require LOTS more pumping that the Moeller...

As opposed to creating a "vacuum" that does the sucking, you are actually pumping the oil with each stroke.. A nice selling feature just not the best or easiest to use...
 

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Don't get me wrong, they work. They are just extremely slow and never seem to be in a location where pumping it is easy. They are usually good for a shoulder cramp and require LOTS more pumping that the Moeller...

As opposed to creating a "vacuum" that does the sucking, you are actually pumping the oil with each stroke.. A nice selling feature just not the best or easiest to use...
Thanks RC...now he wont sell me his Moeller.....:laugher:laugher:laugher:laugher

Hope you guys are weathering the winter so far. We have gotten away with nothing here yet, while you guys have had a few northern storms swipe you.
 

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I just ordered a Moeller at the end of this past season. I had been using one of those electric units from WM. The oil containment unit was large and very easy to manage, but the electric motor was slow and it was a needless nuisance to run the wiring to a start batt.

I recall the day that I bought the electric unit. We stopped for lunch, had a couple of beers, needed something useful at WM and made the additional impulse buy of this contraption. Alcohol...... the cause of and solution to all of life's problems.......
 
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