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I'd give serious thought to moving it down into the cockpit rather than even more forward than it already is. (assuming bheintz' posted pic is accurate) You already have a serious case of "mid-boom-itis".

I realize there are implications with this too, but from a useability standpoint a mainsheet adjustment that is ready to hand is so much easier (and safer) than a cabin-top winch controlled arrangement, esp if you sail shorthanded. A boom-end mounted mainsheet looks like it would be near the helmsman to boot.
 

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Moving the traveler even more forward will reduce further any mechanical advantage the mainsheet has now, although if you utilize the existing bales the effect may not be noticable. The 'pull', though, will become less downward and have a forward component that could put added strain on the gooseneck fitting... simply put you're reducing the efficiency of an already compromised setup.

Installing the track across the cockpit just ahead of the helm binnacle should work OK, and as you say not cause any new significant obstacle there. Having your mainsheet - probably a simple 4 part tackle (using good low friction blocks) would be adequate- pulling on the end of the boom offers you a 6 foot longer lever to work with and it's handy to the helmsman. That location also deals with any dodger interference issues (including running the existing setup back into/under the dodger area). With a swivel fiddle block/camcleat on the mainsheet it will be equally accessible to the helmsman or anyone in the cockpit area.

Mid boom sheeting arrangements are more likely to fail in a hard gybe because the inertia of the end of the boom (and a large portion of the force on the sail) wants to carry on when the forward-mounted mainsheet pulls up short. Admittedly it rarely happens, but the effect can be imagined as being similar to breaking a yardstick over your knee. Try breaking that yardstick with the ends supported and striking it in the middle... it will take more force to do so.

btw - the picture shows no vang rigged - hopefully you do have one - it's one of the more important safety features of a well rigged boat.
 

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My wife might object to my removing the cockpit table to make room for the traveler. It would be a great place for it for single handed sailing.

What would you suggest the bail locations be for that set up?

Yes we do have a vang rigged. Essential!

George
The sheet could attach directly to the end of the boom, requiring a single attachment point - there may already be something usable in the boom end casting.

If you have a fold down table on the binnacle, then that is a problem... they're very nice to have. But - perhaps it might be modified to be stored while sailing and reattached when necessary - putting a snap shackle on the mainsheet connection to the traveller allows you to remove it to the rail (well out of the way) when moored, anchored etc.

Another issue might be cockpit lockers (looks like there's one to port?).. you'll need a fixed seat area in way of the traveller track to properly mount it (unless you'd be satisfied with a traveler only as wide as the space between the seats.)

So.. plan B (C?).. You have no bridge deck ahead of the companionway, but you could create one (SD has a thread somewhere on a similar project) and the track could go to the front of the cockpit. you'd also be modifying your companionway so this is much bigger deal - or simply span the gap but you create a shin-basher. Also having the mainsheet that far forward in the cockpit limits the aft extent of your planned dodger....

Aha!! Plan D - get a bigger boat:) ;)

Here's a link to a sistership with a dodger and the traveler in the original location:

View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com
 

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Plan D is on the drawing board! I just retired (last week)........ What kind of a handicap do you think a dodger will create in a race. I do not intend to go to a folding prop so my racing will be for fun.

George
In performance terms the dodger's a non issue, esp if you're staying with a fixed prop - that's a much larger detriment to speed than the dodger.

Where the dodger gets in the way of racing is access to the cabin top controls like halyard stoppers, the mainsheet (if there), impeding crew moving rail to rail during tacking and possibly visibility/line of sight issues on close crossings. It also makes communicating with crew on the foredeck more difficult - a crew member working under the dodger will not hear or be heard well by anyone forward, and vice-versa.

Sounds like you got a good little boat - and your plans/intentions sort of rule out any major mods unless you're doing it for the fun of it!

Enjoy her as best you can and keep an eye out for the next one!!:)
 
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