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grumpy old man
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
If you are at all interested in the history of production boat building especially as it pertains to Taiwan I encourage you to read my latest blog entry where I wrap up the story of the extended Baba family. It was an exciting time in my life. My work in Taiwan changed me. I loved working there and I really enjoyed the highly skilled people I worked with there.

Xie xie Taiwan.
Yacht Design According to Perry
 

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I know a guy with a baba that was cut in half and lengthened.

I think I recall you writing about it a couple of years ago.

Ring a bell?
 

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Fun to read too. Thanks for taking the time to give all the fanboys out here something to read.

And I found one for sale down your way. Just about 2 years too early right now for the "big" boat. Saving for that project as we speak. Go boat kitty!
 

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grumpy old man
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Alaska:
No problem. Thank you.

I have fun writing those blogs. I never intended this entry to be three chapters long but as I got into it I found there were a lot of details I wanted to get down before they were forgotten. I get the feeling that I write them for myself as much as anyone else.
 

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My husband and I just purchased a Tashiba 36. I have a guestion that I think only you can answer. The LOA is listed as 36ft. From what I have found that is actually the LOD. What is the actual LOA?
 

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grumpy old man
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Dear:
That was then. This is now. In the age of production boats built from a mold the LOA is length of the boat from tip of the bow to the tip of the stern as the boat comes out of the mold. That is pretty much industry standard. People may tell you LOA is something else. That's fine. They are wrong. Measured this way your LOA is 35'11".

In the old days when boats had long bowsprits and stern "boomkins" LOA could have been used to include those extensions. The LOA that I sue would then be called LOD. But you see, with a stern like yours, the LOD is actually shorter than the length of the entire molded hull. So the LOD is not relevant or accurate in determining max hull length. You are going to lose about 6" using LOD. Think of a boat with an acute reverse transom. LOD would end up being 3' or more shorter than actual LOA even with out bowsprit. Treatment of the stern with or without a transom could have a major effect on LOD.

If we include bowsprit on your boat your "LOA w/ appendages"" would be 40'3".

If you have a stern boomkin, i.e. platform off the stern that does not appear on any of my drawings so I'd have to guess it is 2'8" long and then your LOA w/ appendages would be 42'5". My dimensions are taken from the original working drawings. Once again stern geometry comes into play with this dimension.

Keep in mind that if a marina operator wants to know your LOA he probably wants the appendages included. But, if I am chatting with Chuck Paine and one of us mentions LOA we both immediately know that does not include appendages.

Hope this helps.
 
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