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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all-
Im looking at buying a sailboat to live aboard while i attend college (San Diego). I don''t plan on cruising all that much but might take it out every once and a while. I am on a very tight budget and have been looking at a lot of bargain boats (25-30ft)and all have been <$2000. Most are mid seventies... What is wrong with old boats?? Here no one talks about anything sub $10000. Are these boats ready to sink?? I am fairly skilled in carpentry & mechanics and belive i can handle most repairs, if i can find a manual...but most everything looks as if its in pretty good condition. Can someone give me some perspective on what price to pay for a descent livable sailboat??

this is one im looking at...
http://www.boattraderonline.com/addetail.html?487969
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
If you''re going to live in the San Diego area I can think of NO MORE affordable way. I have a friend stationed there in the Navy that does the exact same thing.
1) check with marina and see if they allow "live-aboards" 2) Plan on at least $300 -$500 a month for slip fees. These can be almost as expensive as a condo in San Diego. 3) How long ago was the hull inspected? 4) Is there a recent marine survey? (blisters in hull, crazing, electronics failures, etc.)
With a boat this age, especially listed as in "average condition", you can expect to spend some times on repair and maintenance.
Best of luck,
M
~~~~_/)~~~~~
 

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Get hold of Practical Sailor''s book: "Practcal Boat Buying", which reviews more than 110 used boats. It points out problem areas in certain designs and things to look for (and things to look out for) in general. IMHO that for a single, a Pearson 30 might be good deal, though a bit tight. In SanD there are likely a good number of Hunters as well. The boats in your price range will be tired, and probably need cosmetic work, but a good one will float you through college. Be sure to get a good surveyor!! Going to college, you don''t want to learn about boats the hard way.
 

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The boat you are considering (on the site you listed) is a powerboat. And, compared to a sailboat, it might be a better live-aboard boat since it will have more beam, and more room down below. Your standing room will be limited, as it would be in a sailboat of the same size, but if you can live with it go for it.
At that price it is uncertain wether the boat would be usable. The engine might be shot, etc.
Have fun.
 

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Theres nothing wrong with purchasing a old boat. I have a 1974 C27 and its a great boat. I paid about $6000 for it, and I consider that about right for the market. You can expect to pay about the same.

A C27 offers about the bare minimum that I would consider for live aboard. It has standing headroom, room for a stove, running water in a sink, a ice box, a small amount of storage. I know of 1 couple that lived on a extensively modified C27 for 16 years. I know of another guy that spent 3 years circumnavigating the globe with one.

Its as small as I would like to go and live on it.

Were I you, I would try to select a TYPE of boat that meets your requirements, and then start to shop for that boat in the market. If your just looking at lots of different boats, its hard to figure out where the value is, as their all different makes and models.

Standing headroom would be a necessity through for me.

Hope that helps,

Larry Taborek
C27 Dixie Chicken
 
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