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Discussion Starter #1
We are using climbing harnesses (Edelrid Fraggle) rather than sailing-specific harnesses. The Crewsaver child harness has no crotch strap and the West Marine child harness does not look that strong (it looks like it has no D-ring, tho I never went to see it in person). Also, I just want something to keep them from falling off and will be watching them so I do not expect to be dragging them behind as a sailing harness is designed to do. Plus the harnesses will be fun in their tree fort. For a tether I am using a continuous loop of spectra webbing, cow-hitched to the harness, that provides 45" of tether. They will attach to lifelines with a carabiner that has a safety latch so that it requires two hands to open it.
 

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Do NOT use spectra for a tether, particularly in the tree fort (very dangerous--probably safer to hit the ground). The sudden jolt of the stop can be VERY injurious, and this practice is specifically forbidden by both OSHA and climbing standards groups (UIAA). Use nylon webbing or dynamic rope.

I doubt strength is an issue; the bugger only weighs 30-60 pounds.

The harness should be just fine; a nice high tie-in and fits well. I've used them on children climbing.
 

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The advice of not using the spectra tether for climbing is very helpful. Used as a tether on the boat, would the connection to a jackline provide the equivalent of stretch?
 

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The advice of not using the spectra tether for climbing is very helpful. Used as a tether on the boat, would the connection to a jackline provide the equivalent of stretch?

Yes, when a tether is hooked to a jackline, the jackline provides all of the meaning full impact attenuation. This is well establish both by calculation and in practice.

However, when attached to a cockpit hardpoint, this not the case and several failures have been documented. As a result, the new ISO 12401 standard includes a drop test, which can only be passed by nylon lanyards.
 
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