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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have the opportunity to purchase a 1964 Chris Craft sail yacht 35 but have not seen it in person as of yet. Doing some research on the boat and having seen a few poorly taken pictures, I am confused about the deck. The deck certainly appears to be wood but I can't find anything online to confirm this. Any insight that you may add would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Re: Chris Craft Sail Yacht

Moving this into its own thread so it doesn't get lost.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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I don't know about the 35 but I looked fairly seriously at a 42 many years ago and I am pretty sure it had a glass deck but might have had plywood core in places. Good, old S&S design and seemed to be well built. Of course these boats are very old now so you would want to check out the condition thoroughly.
 
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All the Chris Craft sailboats I've seen around here (and there's quite a few as they were built about 30 miles down the road in Holland, MI) appeared to have a glass deck and house. Looking at the photos on Google, I don't remember ever seeing the 35 center cockpit in person. Those bright finished cabin sides sure do look like a wood deck and house. I have seen wood inlayed into a glass cabin to give it that appearance, but I don't know if anyone would have been doing that in 1964.

On a 50 year old boat, however, I think the care the boat was given would be more important than the original construction material. You could have a poorly maintained glass deck with a mushy, delaminated core or a well maintained wood deck still in perfect condition. One of the advantages of wood is any damage that does occur can be easier to repair without leaving any trace. Core rot and delamination in glass sneaks up on you and by time it shows itself it's catastrophic. The only way to tell is to inspect the boat and better yet have it surveyed. I wouldn't dismiss the boat just because the deck may be wood without checking it out first.
 

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There was a boat like that for sale here: 1963 Chris Craft Sail Yacht sailboat for sale in Virginia
It sure does look like the deck is wood. As previous posters said, it is all about the actual condition. Wood decks are very fixable but it can be a big job. I would first take a very close look at it myself, and if still interested, got a survey done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wish to Thank everyone for their assistance and knowledge. I will most definitely have a full survey completed prior to purchase. I won't be able to inspect the boat for another month or so but wanted to gain as much information pertaining to possible repair and maintenance. Any first hand knowledge of the CC35 sail yacht is appreciated. Take care and thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank You Chaz H. A few articles hinted to that being a possibility. I don't mind the fiberglass/wood embossed deck but wonder how in the world I would be able to sand it good enough for sealer(if needed), primer and paint. Anyway, Thanks again for your help.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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You don't need to sand it smooth to pain. You just need to prepare the surface to accept the paint. Either a very light sand (you want the pattern for non-skid) or a chemical prep. if there are a lot of repairs needed to the deck you would be best off sanding the pattern off and adding your own non-skid material (several options and not hard to do).
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Chemical Prep! I have always prepared surfaces for finishing by sanding. I knew liquid sanding chems were out there but never had any experience with them. Can you expect the same primer adhesion via chem prep as you would a full sanding? If so, that would be perfect.
 

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If it is a laid teak deck RUN AWAY. Deck replacement in the USA would cost more than the boat is worth. Even ripping off teak and making good is serious work/time /money.

This is digging in to my memory banks but I helped someone out on a CC Chris Craft of about 35 40 ft long, it had wooden cabin sides and a FG deck.

The wooden sides MIGHT just have been an inlay or worse still some kind of stick on effect.

Anyway if the cabin sides are wood look real hard around the ports and along the bottom for rot. Again you are looking at lots of work for a proper fix. Although I have seen someone just cut out what they could get to, inset some construction ply with copious use of bog. Sand paint and refit the ports. All done in 3 days. Anyway the finish was OK from 10 ft. it no longer rained inside the cabin and he was off sailing again.
 

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I recall a 37 Apache I saw in WI that had glass decks with wood-like appearance molded into the glass. I don't know about the core material.
-CH
This, and in most of the reviews they said it was very convincing, but then again if you look at the counter top material and boat bulkheads of the time that were Formica type coverings the bar was not set very high. Back then shiny polyester shirts were said to look like real silk too. :rolleyes:

From my understanding they put on a wood deck and took a mold of it. Seems like a lot of trouble to go through. I have not seen one in person so I am not sure but they are very nice looking S&S designs. Interiors are kind of strange though. Kind of look like old Cris Craft wood power boats on the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Boat looks like it has a lot of character and we would love to own it. There are many steps yet to be completed before that takes place but your assistance (and all the others as well) is a big help! The wood embossed FG works for me as long as it proves to be solid/dry upon survey. Thanks for the information!
 

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The boat you are looking at - the Sail Yacht - was later renamed the Caribbean 35.

I have some information, including the original brochure, layout, reviews and pictures for the Caribbean 35. I almost bought one when I was boat hunting a few years ago but another (and different) boat came up closer to home. Very nice boat and well built. Here is an excerpt from one of the reviews (SpinSheet, June 2007):

"...Over the next 15 years, Chris-Craft went on to build eight sailboat models between 26 and 42 feet, but the Sail Yacht, later renamed the Caribbean 35, holds a number of distinctive "first" honors. Foremost among them, this was the first fiberglass boat built by Chris-Craft. The model is believed to be the first Chris-Craft designed by an outside design firm. And, literally last but perhaps not least, the Caribbean 35 was the last sailboat built by Chris-Craft when they discontinued sailboat production in the mid-1970s.

Although Shields was a well-known racing sailor, he was a very successful businessman and smart enough to leverage his new company's long-standing reputation for building comfortable motor yachts. The noted design firm of Sparkman and Stephens was chosen to design Chris-Craft's first sailboat offering. Even by the standards of the day, her sail area was modest, horsepower was abundant, and she had a center cockpit aft cabin arrangement. The choice was made to market the model as the Sail Yacht 35, but they could have just as well called her the Motorsailer 35.

As noted above, this was the first Chris-Craft to be built with a fiberglass hull, although the superstructures of early models were stick-built (piece by piece, in place) of fiberglass, marine plywood, teak, and mahogany. The later Caribbean models were built with a molded fiberglass composite cabin and deck structure. The quality of construction is typical of production-built fiberglass boats of the 1960s and 1970s. The newest models are now at least 30 years old, the oldest well over 40, and it's unreasonable not to expect to have to invest a little time and money for renovations and repairs. Hulls are typically sound, although rudders and their attachments can be problematic. Fiberglass attachments of bulkheads and joiner work are likely to suffer some degree of detachment. However, deteriorated decks and superstructures are, by far, the biggest and potentially the most expensive problems found with both models.

Both the Sail Yacht and Caribbean are center cockpit models; although, there are some quite noticeable differences between the two. The forward cabin and aft cabin of the Sail Yacht 35 (pictured) are on the same plane with a motorsailer-type fixed windshield forward of the companionway and three rectangular ports in the cabin side. The Caribbean model has a slightly raised doghouse at the aft section of the forward cabin with two large fixed windows in it and four small rectangular opening ports. Although the cockpits of both models are small, that of the Caribbean 35 is even smaller; a concession to better accommodations and a below deck passageway from the forward to the aft cabins.
 

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There was a 37 up here N.E. for sale a few yrs ago. It was a nice design! What I found astonishing was that the factory used flat steel plates imbedded in the decks for the jib sheet winch pads. Well water got to the steel, it expanded and literally blew out the deck upwards in the exact shape of the steel pads! Makes you wonder if the they were all done that way!?
 

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I knew the early 1960's era Chris Craft 35s pretty well. They sailed quite well for a motor sailer but not so great compared to auxiliary sailboats of that era. That said with shoal draft for a 35 footer, and a very small amount of ballast, they were pretty tender. This was somewhat masked by their very small sail area, but the combo of tender and small sail area made them poor performers in both light and heavy air. But that was what the big engine was for.

As the write up notes, they had conventional f.g. hulls but the decks and cabins were built the way you would build a wooden boat, with deck beams, carlins, shelves, etc. all made in wood. The decks were glass over plywood, the house sides solid teak or mahogany planking, and so on. The layout was a little strange being a walkover aft cabin. The write up is mistaken in a couple facts. The Shields class was the first F.G boat and first sailboat that Chris Craft built. It was also the first boat designed outside of Chris Craft that Chris Craft built. The Carribean was a very different boat and was actually built in Taiwan.

Jeff
 
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