SailNet Community banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,541 Posts
I think you've missed my point. I agree with you that boat was probably on a rough ride. We would also with high wind and wave trains from multiple directions. My response was to DDW sailing.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,501 Posts
Forward of the beam, it carves
Beam on, just a gentle pick up and let down
Aft quarter turns the boat...fatiguing
Astern, gentle
This is exactly my experience. The conditions I'm most likely to have to hold back digestive concerns is quartering seas and wind, especially if they are tight together. Not every time, but no other condition seems to do it. While not good for the boat, I suppose, pounding into steep waves ahead never bothers me a bit, nor simply rolling from the beam. Its the roll plus yaw that gets to me.

I've sailed in messy Christmas winds, more than once. For us, 80 degree wind is a huge mitigating factor. Not sure why, but I can take a lot more abuse in warm air than in the Northeast. We once beat our way out to North Sound in 30+kt NE winds. Took most of the daylight, while in and out of island shadowing. Virtually no one out there, but we were okay with it. The boat next to us, off Saba, yelled over and said that had to be awful. Eh. Probably vacation mode too, which may allow for a bit more single day/passage tolerance than when one has options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Ahh. Dave on Saba Rock. We go in as locals and would get taken care of. Before there were "rooms" there. Haven't been up there since long before Bitter End evaporated in Irmaria.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
This is exactly my experience. The conditions I'm most likely to have to hold back digestive concerns is quartering seas and wind, especially if they are tight together. Not every time, but no other condition seems to do it. While not good for the boat, I suppose, pounding into steep waves ahead never bothers me a bit, nor simply rolling from the beam. Its the roll plus yaw that gets to me.

I've sailed in messy Christmas winds, more than once. For us, 80 degree wind is a huge mitigating factor. Not sure why, but I can take a lot more abuse in warm air than in the Northeast. We once beat our way out to North Sound in 30+kt NE winds. Took most of the daylight, while in and out of island shadowing. Virtually no one out there, but we were okay with it. The boat next to us, off Saba, yelled over and said that had to be awful. Eh. Probably vacation mode too, which may allow for a bit more single day/passage tolerance than when one has options.
I really enjoyed the beat up Sir Francis Drake Channel back when I was chartering there.
The last time we did it in Christmas Winds, on Skipping Stone, and she was big enough and heavy enough to just pound her way through that chop, even from Charlotte Amalie to Christmas Cove. Lots of short tacking, but the wife and I had a blast together. Tough on the headsail, though, with the staysail stay in place.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SanderO

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I even envy you a little. In 2020, I practically could not go anywhere at all. All because of COVID and relatives who are at risk. I had to limit travel and contacts to a minimum. I plan to catch up in 2021. What places do you recommend to visit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,501 Posts
What places do you recommend to visit?
Might help, if you narrow your query a bit. Are you asking about places to visit that have Christmas winds? Planning to bareboat?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
I think the poster is just looking to get out and about. I will head for Maine in April, kill some native brookies, tie back into the Tartan 37 refit (I've decided to replace the rear seal and do a head job on the old Westerbeast before busting off in the fall to deliver back to St. Thomas) and get the Dyer 29 tooled up to bring down to the Caribbean. Intending, of course, to remain broke but having a good time. Wife thinks it's the refits that entertain me. She may be somewhat correct. But life afloat . . .
Stbd Fwd.jpg
STB SIDE 73.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,501 Posts
Truth is, there are plenty of places one could visit right now, if they were willing to go through the testing and quarantine requirements. I can also travel unrestricted within my own State too. At least as safely as wherever one started from, if you practice social distancing protocols.

Still, we all look forward to blowing this dark cloud away and getting back to normal access. 99% odds I will be bareboating in the Caribbean next winter. I don't say 100, only because I've yet to see how the industry survives it all. Painfully, while many business have borrowed their way through this, competitors will be able to start up without all that back debt and compete more leanly. I fear restaurants, in particular, will have this problem. The shakeup will take years to settle out. Still, I expect it will return to near normal pretty quickly (post hurd immunity), but not all the historic pieces will individually survive. I should caveat, hurd immunity will be must faster in developed nations, but the virus will be rampant world-wide for years to come and more obscure places may have restrictions for much longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Truth is, there are plenty of places one could visit right now, if they were willing to go through the testing and quarantine requirements. I can also travel unrestricted within my own State too. At least as safely as wherever one started from, if you practice social distancing protocols.

Still, we all look forward to blowing this dark cloud away and getting back to normal access. 99% odds I will be bareboating in the Caribbean next winter. I don't say 100, only because I've yet to see how the industry survives it all. Painfully, while many business have borrowed their way through this, competitors will be able to start up without all that back debt and compete more leanly. I fear restaurants, in particular, will have this problem. The shakeup will take years to settle out. Still, I expect it will return to near normal pretty quickly (post hurd immunity), but not all the historic pieces will individually survive. I should caveat, hurd immunity will be must faster in developed nations, but the virus will be rampant world-wide for years to come and more obscure places may have restrictions for much longer.
It looks, out my window, like the charter industry is booming here in the USVI. People are quarantining on yachts. Even Paris Hilton is down here sitting on one of those units down below the house in Magen's Bay. I went to a private high school with her father, Ricky. That was 50 years ago. And I got kicked out for attending a Jethro Tull concert 2 hours away.

I think the pent-up demand for "getting the F out of Dodge" is going to result in a banner year for bareboat companies in 2021-22 IF we don't get whacked by hurricanes like Irmaria. Which is why both my boats will be owned in LLC's, insured and demise chartered as captained charters. One to sail, one to fish. Got it frickin' covered. It also makes the downisland trip at end of season to S of 12N deductible. Drop the boat in Grenada or Tobago, fly to Miami, head to Maine for a few months.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
It looks, out my window, like the charter industry is booming here in the USVI. People are quarantining on yachts. Even Paris Hilton is down here sitting on one of those units down below the house in Magen's Bay. I went to a private high school with her father, Ricky. That was 50 years ago. And I got kicked out for attending a Jethro Tull concert 2 hours away.

I think the pent-up demand for "getting the F out of Dodge" is going to result in a banner year for bareboat companies in 2021-22 IF we don't get whacked by hurricanes like Irmaria. Which is why both my boats will be owned in LLC's, insured and demise chartered as captained charters. One to sail, one to fish. Got it frickin' covered. It also makes the downisland trip at end of season to S of 12N deductible. Drop the boat in Grenada or Tobago, fly to Miami, head to Maine for a few months.
Have you done chartering before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
100T Master's (12 pack) with offshore sail and tow endorsements, but let that lapse years ago. I won't be "doing" the charters, just owning the company that owns the insured boats.

Oh, and we're back to lilting winds up here. Although nights are downright Septoberish. Good sleeping weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,501 Posts
It looks, out my window, like the charter industry is booming here in the USVI.
That's very good to hear. I hope you're right. It may be hard to assess visually. Clearly, there are some going to the effort and perhaps staying long term. A look at CYOA's availability calendar show more than half the time over the next couple of months available. It would typically be near impossible to book a winter charter, after the boat shows. I worry that, like most businesses, their expenses are not all variable to revenue and they make all their profit on the last few sales. Which may not be happening.


I think the pent-up demand for "getting the F out of Dodge" is going to result in a banner year for bareboat companies in 2021-22 IF we don't get whacked by hurricanes like Irmaria.
I'd be willing to be you're right about the pent up demand. The next iteration of the roaring 20s, with ironically similar motivations to the one last century. I sure hope a hurricane doesn't pour salt in the wound. Too soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Might help, if you narrow your query a bit. Are you asking about places to visit that have Christmas winds? Planning to bareboat?
This is not a specific intention yet, but only a desire. I would like to know what and how, how interesting it is. Maybe such a trip is a good romantic idea and a way to spend time with your wife, see special places and experience unique phenomena.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
This is not a specific intention yet, but only a desire. I would like to know what and how, how interesting it is. Maybe such a trip is a good romantic idea and a way to spend time with your wife, see special places and experience unique phenomena.
It's only going to be a romantic trip if you and your wife are experienced and comfortable enough to sail a strange (new to you) boat together without any friction. Sadly, I see a lot more friction between couples on bareboats than harmony.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,571 Posts
@capta you're getting a dose of Christmas Winds this week, by the looks :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
It's only going to be a romantic trip if you and your wife are experienced and comfortable enough to sail a strange (new to you) boat together without any friction. Sadly, I see a lot more friction between couples on bareboats than harmony.
Yes, I think a separate preparation is needed here. This is my dream that everything will be beautiful and romantic. What if there is a storm or something else? My wife has no sailing experience. We thought to swim together in the spring, but these are only plans. And my dreams have already gone ahead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,501 Posts
Yes, I think a separate preparation is needed here. This is my dream that everything will be beautiful and romantic. What if there is a storm or something else? My wife has no sailing experience. We thought to swim together in the spring, but these are only plans. And my dreams have already gone ahead.
Was swim together a typo?

It's not impossible for you to be the only experienced sailor aboard, assuming your wife is a very willing participant and able to follow basics on how to wrap a line on a winch, ease it out or trim it in, at your instruction. When anchoring or picking up a mooring, one of you will need to be at the helm, while the other at the bow handles the mooring line or anchor. It will never work well, if she's just a passenger and you attempt to do everything else. For that matter, she may simply not like being in such a subordinate position. I know some wives that refuse and tell their husbands to turn on the motor and leave them alone. True story.

Your experience will dictate how big a boat the charter companies are willing to rent to you. If you are the only knowledgeable sailor aboard (and they ask for everyone's experience), it will probably limit you more.

My wife attended a week long live aboard sailing course and came out as a capable mate.

If your wife is neither going to learn how to sail, nor a willing winch grinder, anchor tender, etc, there is another approach. Find another couple, with at least one relatively experienced sailor and share the experience. We've bareboated with other couples many times and it's always been great. Mostly, we're the experienced sailors, but when there are more knowledgeable or at least willing hands on deck, it's so easy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Yes, a typo. I sometimes confuse words because of fatigue after a working day.

My wife has never sailed at all, you should at least once try to sail with her in the sea, in familiar waters and not far from home. Otherwise, I’ll think of a joint trip for myself, and she won’t like it at all. She is my stay-at-home, but she is not against my hobby. And I'm already used to the fact that she is more comfortable at home. Everyone has their own temperament.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
Yes, a typo. I sometimes confuse words because of fatigue after a working day.

My wife has never sailed at all, you should at least once try to sail with her in the sea, in familiar waters and not far from home. Otherwise, I’ll think of a joint trip for myself, and she won’t like it at all. She is my stay-at-home, but she is not against my hobby. And I'm already used to the fact that she is more comfortable at home. Everyone has their own temperament.
I guess I'm extremely fortunate. My wife (not then) sailed for the very first time by leaving Newport with me and sailed to ST. T. via Bermuda. When we arrived in ST. T I asked her if she wanted a ticket home. It wasn't a particularly bad trip, as most to Bermuda can be, but we did have a night on continuous thunderstorms that spun us around in the gusty cyclonic winds dozens and dozens of times before I finally gave up and powered out of the line of storms on the way south. We lost every inch of our easting out of Bermuda that we had worked so hard for.
Anyway, she replied, "Heck no. When are we leaving for down island?" She's one hell of a sailor now, and for a girl who wasn't much of a cook, a well reviewed charter cook! In the pic below, she's just caught her first dolphin, and at that point seems to be considering chucking it back into the sea, doesn't she? Never no more!
There's always hope, guys.

138521
 
  • Like
Reactions: MarkofSeaLife
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top