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A proper shore power panel for 30 amp service has a double pole breaker (30 amp) as a main breaker with other breakers for each circuit, usually 15 amps, each wired with 14 gauge wire. The wire from the shore connection to the panel is 10 gauge wire. The panel includes reverse polarity indicator lights. This is a good example of a proper panel.



Many older boats came with just a single double breaker of 30 amps and that should be corrected so any individual circuit cannot draw more than the current it is rated for, typically 15 amps. I would think any good surveyor would consider this a requirement.
 

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Probably 15 amp. You will likely have a 30amp main breaker which feeds a 30 amp dual on your panel, that feeds 15 amp outlet breakers from there.
Brian
The 30 amp main double pole main breaker will feed the 15 amp circuits directly if done properly.

Agree with a GCFI on the first outlet in line on each circuit - it will protect any outlets downstream on the same circuit.
 

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About 80% of the boats I see have significant electrical issues caused by inexperienced hands. I'd guess about 15% are potentially lethal and I don't understand why more people don't die.

Just for fun I threw up a little photo album of the stuff I see on a daily basis. I think it will be easy to see why I am a little cynical on the topic.
I agree - I too have seen issues such as live AC wires a few inches from bilge water covered with electrical tape and other disasters waiting to happen. I've wondered why more boats don't catch fire or injure as well.
 
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