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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking into buying a CL 16. I don't know much about this boat other than it is a fiberglass version of a Wayfarer. The boat is a 1982 model. Is there any specific problems I should look for in a used CL 16? Also does anyone have any advice if this boat is even one I should be looking at. I just moved to Florida and from the midwest and have some specific criteria in mind.

1) I want the boat to be performance orientated but also with a high degree of stability for a sailing dinghy. And yes I know an increase in one decreases the other. And I know that dinghy's are inherently unstable compared to a keel boat.
2) I want it to be easily trailered and rigged by one person.
3) I want it to be able to accommodate 2 or 3 people for afternoon day sails.
4) Can handle a small motor to get from the launch ramp to where I want to sail.

If the CL 16 isn't the boat for me does anyone have any suggestions on what I should be looking for? My budget is around $2000 +/- so whatever I find will probably be off of craigslist in the Fort Meyer's area. My previous 2 boats were a Santana 20 (which is for sale in Missouri if anyone is looking for one) and a sunfish. Both of those boats had sailing aspects that I really enjoyed and I figured a 16 foot sailing dinghy be the ideal combination of what I enjoyed rom both of those boats. Right now I don't have any need for a small cabin on a boat although some day I will probably upgrade to something with overnighting potential.
 

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CL16 should work for you but I think there are better boats out there IMO. CL16 has a lot of sail area which means it can be hard to handle for 1 person when wind picks up. It's construction/design can also be a problem as it can easily get flooded if you bury the rail in a gusty condition.
I would check craigslist for boats available in your area.
 

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You don't say if you want to race or not bit since you are moving to the area look into what kind of local one class racing there is. Often they use a boat because they are suited to the local conditions. Plus one class racing can be fun if you decide to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Right now I don't plan on racing. Although someday I might change over to a class race boat. I guess a race boat would be the opposite of what I would want. Or at least I don't want 20 different lines to worry about. Just a simple daysailor is what I am looking for.
 

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I sailed a Wayfarer for a while, it was a mk iii, which is the version they based the CL16 on. Also fibreglass.

Some thoughts in no particular order :

It is easy to rig and launch single handed, although a little time consuming. It is specifically designed so that the mast can be easily lowered for all those bridges over English waterways.

It is extremely stable for a centreboard dinghy, in fact it might be the most seaworthy one in existence, but not as stable as a keelboat of course. I believe that sailing one safely requires one to anticipate, and practice for recovery from, a capsize.

Most capsizes stem from use of large genoas in strong winds. For SF Bay I had a 100 percent jib which worked well.

The worst capsizes involve turtling and getting the mast stuck in the bottom. This can be avoided by having some floatation at the top of the mast.

A lot of people install some flotation, in my case in the form of inflated beach balls, in the forward locker. The other poster is right about the volume of water inside. I had a bucket, attached by a line, in the aft locker.

They work great with an outboard. I had a 3.5 Tohatsu.

Day sailing with 3 is pleasant. Forget about planing though! With one or two sailors and a decent wind, they will get on plane and 8 to 10 kts is possible.
 

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PS, as far as inspection goes, the most common issue is distortion of the hull, caused by improper trailering. The weight of the boat should sit on its keel on the rollers, and then be lightly supported by the chines. Straps should be loose enough to still allow the boat to rock a little. Look down the underneath of the boat and look for ripples in the hull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I sailed a Wayfarer for a while, it was a mk iii, which is the version they based the CL16 on. Also fibreglass.

Some thoughts in no particular order :

It is easy to rig and launch single handed, although a little time consuming. It is specifically designed so that the mast can be easily lowered for all those bridges over English waterways.

It is extremely stable for a centreboard dinghy, in fact it might be the most seaworthy one in existence, but not as stable as a keelboat of course. I believe that sailing one safely requires one to anticipate, and practice for recovery from, a capsize.

Most capsizes stem from use of large genoas in strong winds. For SF Bay I had a 100 percent jib which worked well.

The worst capsizes involve turtling and getting the mast stuck in the bottom. This can be avoided by having some floatation at the top of the mast.

A lot of people install some flotation, in my case in the form of inflated beach balls, in the forward locker. The other poster is right about the volume of water inside. I had a bucket, attached by a line, in the aft locker.

They work great with an outboard. I had a 3.5 Tohatsu.

Day sailing with 3 is pleasant. Forget about planing though! With one or two sailors and a decent wind, they will get on plane and 8 to 10 kts is possible.
When you say time consuming to rig how long would it take an average person to rig it single handedly. Getting out on the water as fast as possible is a pretty big factor for me.
 

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Well, I never managed to launch mine without at least 2 conversations with curious onlookers. The same when retrieving. So usually about an hour from arriving to boat in the water, ready to go. Maybe could be done in half an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's not bad. A lot of people talk about getting there boat launched in 15 minutes but I think might be exaggerating a little bit. Or don't consider some of the things they do as part of the launch process.
 
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