SailNet Community banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Wow, waiting on an answer since 2002 for what has to be a common issue.

Its blowing stink here on the bay and I'd like to get something done today before heading home. Anybody got a suggestion to help me get my stuffing box cleaned up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Typically I use metal polish and elbow grease. For hard to reach spots the dremel works good with a small wire brush. I then polish again and cover with a thin coat of winch grease to prevent further oxidation. It seems to work ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Typically I use metal polish and elbow grease. For hard to reach spots the dremel works good with a small wire brush. I then polish again and cover with a thin coat of winch grease to prevent further oxidation. It seems to work ok.
That's exactly what I just finished using, and got about a 90% result. I only had a limited selection of brushes for the Dremel, didn't have a metal bristled tooth brush with me and that's what would have made the difference. I'll raid the gun cleaning kit at home and finish up next weekend.

Great tip on the grease, and I'll do that once I get the threads and toughest green spots off the stuffing box.

If there is secret product to replace elbow grease I'd still be interested. It does require some contortions to get to the stuffing box, so the quicker the job goes, the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
It seems if I do not clean the seacocks the oxidation ceases the seacock from opening and closing. Especially, the oxidation at the edges between the drum and housing is the worse, so I have decided to keep the entire seacock clean. I also have grounding wires attached and want to maintain good conduction etc.. I am still learning though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Why? The oxidized copper patina itself is a barrier to further corrosion. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
I have marlon seacocks so I probably wouldn't worry if it wasn't affecting the operation. However, a stuffing box though has to be disassembled regularly and I worry about parts seizing if I don't keep the oxidation at bay. If the threads are damaged it will cause an expensive and difficult repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Stuffing Box Corrosion

There is a product called Fluid Film you can use. It is a spray on anti-corrosive and mild lubircant. I spray it on anything that might corrode and now they don't. It may be hard to find and costs about $10 for a good sized can. Try lawnmower or power equipment shops, they seem to have it.

Put in a new stuffing box three seasons ago (long story) sprayed it with Fluid Film and it is still nice a shiney.

Homer Shannon
Bristol 29.9
Windham NH
 

·
Voyager
Joined
·
21 Posts
Cleaning and polishing the metal exposes new fresh metal, allowing it to oxidize more rapidly. If you are worried about the seacocks getting clogged, clean out the flow path once a year, and exercise the mechanism regularly. Coat the threads with the same lithium grease you use to lubricate your winches.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
The threads should be coated with pipe thread dope, at least where they go into other fittings. :D
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top