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I have a Pacific Seacraft 31 1997 Purchased this year.

I doubt the water tanks have been cleaned in many years. They're made of GRP and built into the boat. I do have fairly large observation holes covered in clear plexiglass. I could see some dirt at the bottom and slime on the walls when I shine a light into the tanks. Access into the tanks through these ports "should" not be a problem.

What would you recommend as a good cleaner when I scrub the tanks' insides? Also, when I need to remove this cleaning fluid and the water used to wash the tank, should I pump it directly out of the tanks. Or, is it ok to let that dirty water flow through the pipes and out the faucets? (I will sanitize the whole system with after the tanks are scrubbed/ drained)


Thanks,

Mark
 

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I would never drink water from a tank. You could probably disinfect it with chlorox flushed thru the system... and use the water in the tanks for cleaning, washing and showering.
 

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I went through the same thing last summer. I have a Bristol 29.9 with FRP tanks, each with an access port like you describe. The ports on mine were made by Beckson. I found that those ports would leak when the tank was filled, so I replaced the seals and I also got a 'wrench' from them that was a great help in opening the ports (or deck plates).

Before scrubbing the tanks, I used Peggie's process to kill everything that was in the system, flushed it out the next day, and then scrubbed the tanks - I may have used oxiclean or a bleach solution - I can't really remember. Just nothing too sudsy...

Then I flushed with clean water at least twice. It did the trick. I don't really drink the tank water...but I bet I could.

PS - lubeing the inspection ports also made them seal better and open easier.
 

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...

What would you recommend as a good cleaner when I scrub the tanks' insides? Also, when I need to remove this cleaning fluid and the water used to wash the tank, should I pump it directly out of the tanks. Or, is it ok to let that dirty water flow through the pipes and out the faucets? (I will sanitize the whole system with after the tanks are scrubbed/ drained)


Thanks,

Mark
Mark--

We've had very good results with a Trac Ecological product, see (click on) "PSR". Used as directed, the product does a good job and, afterward, using a product such as AquaBon when refilling the tanks, the water remains "sweet" for quite a long while. Note, however, that we always run refill water through a fine canister filter equipped with hose fittings before admitting it to the tanks and a secondary Pentek sediment and charcoal filter between the tanks and the faucet fixtures and, in the galley, a third "Seagull" filter for drinking and cooking uses.

FWIW...
 
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I would never drink water from a tank. You could probably disinfect it with chlorox flushed thru the system... and use the water in the tanks for cleaning, washing and showering.
Funny… we ALWAYS drink the water from our tank. So far, I’m still ticking along.

We go through an extensive tank shocking, as per Peggy’s advice, at the beginning of every season. Through the season we either add chlorine, or preferably fill with chlorinated water (municipal sources). And then we filter our water through a couple of standard elements (a 5 micron, and a basic carbon filter).

We’ve never had any problems with our water.
 

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Funny… we ALWAYS drink the water from our tank. So far, I’m still ticking along.

We go through an extensive tank shocking, as per Peggy’s advice, at the beginning of every season. Through the season we either add chlorine, or preferably fill with chlorinated water (municipal sources). And then we filter our water through a couple of standard elements (a 5 micron, and a basic carbon filter).

We’ve never had any problems with our water.
We rarely drink tap water... bottled water at home and on the boat. Boat has a refillable 3 gallon tank w/spigot. It's over the galley of course.

We filter going in to the tank, filter w/ a culligan to a tap we use for rice, pasta.
 

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NSF-53 rated carbon block filters (cysts) offer the same performance as Seagull for a fraction the price (eg. Pentek Floplus 10 for $17). And Seagull is not NSF rated. Just sayin'.

As for statements that "we don't drink tank water," it's environmentally embarrassing, in this age, in my opinion. We can do better. We need to do better. And it is easy to do.

I cover the basics here:

Sail Delmarva: Drinking Water Filtration--The Short Version
 

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NSF-53 rated carbon block filters (cysts) offer the same performance as Seagull for a fraction the price (eg. Pentek Floplus 10 for $17). And Seagull is not NSF rated. Just sayin'.

As for statements that "we don't drink tank water," it's environmentally embarrassing, in this age, in my opinion. We can do better. We need to do better. And it is easy to do.

I cover the basics here:

Sail Delmarva: Drinking Water Filtration--The Short Version
Thanks for this. Great advice about pre-filtering the water. And I’ve always bought rather generic sediment/carbon filters. Reading your post gives me a better idea of what to look for.

Like I say, we always drink from our tank. I couldn’t imagine how we’d manage otherwise, but we tend to be off the dock for two to three months at a time. We do carry our old camp water filter, which we could use if our tank got contaminated, but in nearly a decade with this boat, it’s been no problem.
 

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If im unsure about the water it first goes thru the 2 micron gravity camp filter...which is slower than an dead turtle on ludes.
A little brita is on the faucet.

Make tank clean and just be careful about what goes in it.
 

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collect rain water????
Another thread.

You realize, of course, that there are many places where people (not poor areas) live on rain water from roofs. Many health departments have studied this and Google will reveal the studies.
 

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I have 3 hard jerry cans and 3 collapsables that could be used for collection...then camp filter.
If they are full...no water needed...:)
Collapsable is 1st emptied...kept away from UVs.

Yes good post...many many people use only rain water
 

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There were actually two reasons I investigated rainwater filtration options:

* Boat on the hook. As I mentioned in another thread, a friend asked me for a solution for his boat on the hook. He knew I was a chemical engineer.
* The water at my home marina is skunky. Or rather it is high in sulfate, a little salty, and just nasty. Rainwater is actually much better, if you take the appropriate steps.

In fact, we had several blind taste-offs with bottled water; no one could tell the difference.
 

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The classic mistake is to overfill the tank after you have cleaned it. The free circulation of oxygen is vital to maintaining fresh water in a fresh state. Always leave a free surface so that oxygen can get in to the water.
 

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We collect rain water off our hardtop. It passes through a 5uM filter on its way to the tank. From the tank, it passes through a 0.5uM charcoal filter to the house system. Wonderful, and the best part of rainy season. Our hardtop can collect 100 gal/hr in a downpour. The water tastes pure and clean - better than our RO water, and much better than any municipal supply.

Almost all of the countries we visit use cisterns and roof collection systems. And I don't mean poor areas - Bermuda's billionaires are drinking rain water. So are the millionaires in Antigua and Mustique. And millions of middle class people in pretty much all of South and Central America outside the largest cities.

Of course, the poorer people do also.

Frankly, I'd take mud puddle water over Florida's municipal water any day.

Mark
 

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The classic mistake is to overfill the tank after you have cleaned it. The free circulation of oxygen is vital to maintaining fresh water in a fresh state. Always leave a free surface so that oxygen can get in to the water.
Not so sure how much fresh air exchange is actually happening through a small vent line, but assuming it does, wouldn't your concern be alleviated at the first shower or dish washing?

Mark
 
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