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g up to expire.

He does not need to hand that cruising permit in. It expires automatically when he leaves the USA.

Mark
Have had dozens of Cruising Licenses and mine expired on the stated date, not when I left US waters. I often leave and return (Florida/Bahamas) under the same cruising license as long as it has not expired by date.
 

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When a non-US vessel has been stored in the US and a Cruising License has expired in the meantime a new Cruising License cannot be acquired until the vessel has left US Water. In this case the vessel needs a Permission to Proceed (out of the country). This is a routine excercise for many Canadian boats stored over summer at places such as Idiantown in Florida. Last year the fee was $27.40. It is illegal for a foreign vessel to move in US waters without a Cruising License or a POP.

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They don't tax you/fine you for overstaying your cruising permit???

'stored' can that mean in the water in a marina?

Because that could be highly advantageous if I decide to do some land travel in another country for a year.
Is there a time limit of the 'storage'?

Mark
 

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You'll pass within sight of my home a couple hours after departure. I'm just south of the big radar installation on the western shore. I'll keep an eye out!
 

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Alternatively you can call Customs and Border Patrol in Baltimore. They have an office downtown, pretty easy to get to.

They MIGHT be able to give you the lapsed work you want. They are probably the same office where you got your cruising permit.

OR check in on the French side of St Martin at the Island Water World near Marina Royal. You just do it on a computer and pay a couple of dollars. I’m almost positive they don’t look for clearance papers.

BUT ALSO there are a bunch of different CBP districts and each enforces the rules differently, with no side knowledge that “their” way is not universal. That could account for different experiences.
 

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If you’re worried about it just go to USVI. Then you’ll have documentation for when you clear into Marigot St.Martin. Easy overnight sail.
Get your East in early. Parker says strong trades throughout January. I’m leaving 2AM in a couple of days for St.Lucia. But I’m a gentleman and gentleman go to weather in an airplane. From St.lucia heading to Martinique. Eventually will get to leewards either then turn around and go back to Grenada or do SDR to Newport. Be nice to cross paths. Will track you on MarineTraffic.
svHippocampus
We are laying in Simpson’s Bay, St Maarten. The wind is crazy erratic, almost nothing to gusts near 40k. Saw a small “dirt devil” on the water yesterday, think we had one hit us last night.
 

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Feel your pain. Be in Rodney on Monday. Want to just up to Martinique. Trivial sail . But have company coming into Marigot st.lucia in a couple of weeks. Ridiculously worried if I can get two one day windows in that time frame. Before coming home for Xmas never saw a full main. Not once since November.
Upside is just about everything is a reach and you can do hull speed all day long if you want. Don’t worry....be happy.
 

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They don't tax you/fine you for overstaying your cruising permit???

'stored' can that mean in the water in a marina?

Because that could be highly advantageous if I decide to do some land travel in another country for a year.
Is there a time limit of the 'storage'?

Mark
Yes, Stored on the hard or in water (not moving). Hundreds of Canadian boats are in this situation every year when they are stored for the summer in Indiantown, Green Cove and Titusville. No cost other the the $27 for the permit. Don't know about time limit but many Canadians do it for about six months.
 

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Which is much more lenient than what Canada allows.

There you get a season and then have to pay a hefty (import?) tax. Unless you run off 3 or 12 miles and then come back.

Canada does not provide “exit” papers either, or at least I’ve never gotten them.
 

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Which is much more lenient than what Canada allows.

There you get a season and then have to pay a hefty (import?) tax. Unless you run off 3 or 12 miles and then come back.

Canada does not provide “exit” papers either, or at least I’ve never gotten them.
I have two American friends who got 1 yr. permits that were then extended to 18 months in Canada then a few hours across Lake Ontario and back for another year..... no taxes, no fees.

Neither are foregin cruisers required to check in with CBP every time they stop the boat as in the US.
 

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I have two American friends who got 1 yr. permits that were then extended to 18 months in Canada then a few hours across Lake Ontario and back for another year..... no taxes, no fees.

Neither are foregin cruisers required to check in with CBP every time they stop the boat as in the US.
The Great Lakes seem to have their own rules, whether written or not. However, even US citizens are required to clear back into the US, when they return from a foreign country. It's no more pleasant an experience for us, if that helps anyone's frustrations.
 

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Boat,

2 points.

What you described above works in some places, not so well in the Gaspe though.

As to checking in every time you move the boat maddeningly that is a LOCAL level interpretation, such as in the NY district. Baltimore district, last time I got a cruising permit a few years ago, could not care less where you are. The regional variations of the rules are well documented.
 

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The Great Lakes seem to have their own rules, whether written or not. However, even US citizens are required to clear back into the US, when they return from a foreign country. It's no more pleasant an experience for us, if that helps anyone's frustrations.
We are currently doing a land cruise in our RV to the Grand Canyon. The thing I find frustrating as a Canadian is that I cross the border in the RV. They ask how long a stay, I say 4 -8 months and they say "Enjoy your vacation". Never have to deal with them again .... Love it.

In our boat it's a different story. Having to call in every time we stop the boat as per Cruising License requirements doesn't sound to onerous, but when you get "this number is no longer in service" or you get some one that says "why are you calling me?" or I'll put you on hold".... some of these calls have taken hours. Or they ask you where you are and you respond Chesapeake Beach they say "no you are not, there is no such place". Or you get "I don't care what the last guy told you, you're dealing with me now" ..... another three hours on the phone.

Please don't take this as a complaint against the US. I've been cruising US waters for 30 years and love the welcoming attitude of the American people. You're bureaucracy I could do without but I'm willing to pay the price (reluctantly :) ).
 
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Boat,

2 points.

What you described above works in some places, not so well in the Gaspe though.

As to checking in every time you move the boat maddeningly that is a LOCAL level interpretation, such as in the NY district. Baltimore district, last time I got a cruising permit a few years ago, could not care less where you are. The regional variations of the rules are well documented.
My experience is bewteen Lake Superior and Florida. Prior to 2016, The rules were frequently ignored by CBP. Since 2016 we have found them to be rigorously applied everywhere.
 
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I concur. Over the six months May to November last year, we checked in by phone every time we moved location - probably 80 times - and we found universally that CBP were polite, helpful and pleased that we were compliant.

Three times we had to leave messages and two of those occasions they called back to confirm details We were boarded once (again very politely) and they left as soon as they called in to find that we had checked in for the location we were at.

I know lots of people have said it is a nightmare but that was not our experience. Over the past two years, we have noticed a huge change in our interactions with CBP.
 

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My last experience was in 2016, Baltimore did t care, NY did, and did in 2014.

But things change and I don’t know the current situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I should close this thread off with this post:

I ended up driving into Norfolk and clearing out at the Customs & Immigration office here. Had nice conversation with the officer there. He did say that clearing out was optional and that even with the cruising permit they just want to know arrivals, departures of any type (for another anchorage or another country) weren't relevant.

When I cleared into the BVI I asked them if I would have had any issues if I'd arrived without exit clearance from the USA and they said no, none at all.

And if the BVI would let me in with no issues, then St. Martin would most likely have been even easier.
 
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