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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for advice on how to rig my furling line. At present it runs smoothly down port side via several stanchion mounted fairleads.

The part I am unhappy with is where it terminates in the cockpit. As you can see in the picture I am simply creating it off to a dockline cleat. This setup works poorly in that the cleat falls behind me when sitting at helm making for uncomfortable and low leverage twisting to get it locked down. I am thinking some sort of clam cleat arrangement but unsure exactly which one and how to attach. Can anyone make a suggestion that does not involve me sending harken $150? :) hopefully the picture sufficiently zooms.
 

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I am looking for advice on how to rig my furling line. At present it runs smoothly down port side via several stanchion mounted fairleads.

The part I am unhappy with is where it terminates in the cockpit. As you can see in the picture I am simply creating it off to a dockline cleat. This setup works poorly in that the cleat falls behind me when sitting at helm making for uncomfortable and low leverage twisting to get it locked down. I am thinking some sort of clam cleat arrangement but unsure exactly which one and how to attach. Can anyone make a suggestion that does not involve me sending harken $150? :) hopefully the picture sufficiently zooms.
In my opinion, you really want to lead your furling line thru a ratchet turning block aft, then back into the cockpit...

I run mine thru rope clutches situated before the ratchet... The yellow line is actually my boom brake, my genoa furling is on the opposite side of the boat, but hopefully this pic gives you the general idea... This setup works very well for me, I have multiple clutches that handle genoa and staysail furlers, foreguy/afterguy/preventers, boom brake and asymetrical tack line...

 

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Shouldn't necessarily cost $150 but methinks you're going to have to buy a more efficient cleat - I'd avoid 'clam cleats' and use a regular cam cleat, and there are several swivel cam cleats available but they edge up over $100 in a hurry.

Installing another horned cleat like you're using now in a better location (maybe on the outside of your wood coamings?) would be a less expensive solution - as would a track-mounted cleat on your rail or the very aft end of a genoa track.
 
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I gave up a long time ago running the furling line along the stanchions. There was too much friction in the arrangement and it loaded the stanchions too much. I just run the line directly now and cleat it off somewhere convenient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Shouldn't necessarily cost $150 but methinks you're going to have to buy a more efficient cleat - I'd avoid 'clam cleats' and use a regular cam cleat, and there are several swivel cam cleats available but they edge up over $100 in a hurry.

Installing another horned cleat like you're using now in a better location (maybe on the outside of your wood coamings?) would be a less expensive solution - as would a track-mounted cleat on your rail or the very aft end of a genoa track.
Ha! Stupid spell-checker. I am aware the proper term is cam cleat... I am considering a cam cleat mounted on top a teak block affixed to the coaming to get it sitting up and better aligned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Does this pic help? The furling line comes off the forward stanchion base and is a small white line that runs back to cleat at bottom of horseshoe ring. That cleat also holds the stern dockline which explains both the pile of line there and the reason for my wishing for a better setup.
 

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Ha! Stupid spell-checker. I am aware the proper term is cam cleat... I am considering a cam cleat mounted on top a teak block affixed to the coaming to get it sitting up and better aligned.
No.. there ARE 'clam cleats'



and 'cam cleats'..



So I was recommending the latter over the former.

Incidentally, regarding leading the furling line along deck.. don't know why more builders don't do this - but our furling line (and our spi pole downhaul) are run through our open-ended SS handrails...
 

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Used a horned cleat at one time, but it tended to snag other lines at the wrong time. A cam-cleat might not be secure enough. A properly placed clutch is expensive but would work well, and is secure. Presently I just put a stopper slipknot in the line that rests against the ratchet block. Cheap, secure, no snags.

I didn't like the leading blocks on each stanchion either so now I have a few little blocks simply fastened to the aluminum toerail. Simpler, cheaper, lighter.

When you leave the boat or weather gets boisterous you don't want that furling line coming undone no matter what.
 

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Whatever you do, make sure it hold the line securely and will not shake loose in a squall when you are not on the boat. If it does, and the sail unwinds, your sail will be destroyed. I would never use a clam cleat. Cam cleat or clutch is better if properly sized. I prefer a standard cleat as it the most secure. It is not something you are regularly adjusting like a traveler, so why not go with the cheapest and most secure option?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It sounds like a combo of cam and horned cleat would work best giving the advantage of control and security. Placement then is the challenge as I don't want to add to crowding of deck on port side of cockpit. Possibly some sort of teak base tied into coaming... Still thinking and appreciate the input here...
 

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Horn cleats are probably the most secure, but can't you resort to the deck cleat when necessary?

When fully unfurled, there is little concern. When fully furled, there is little load, so a clutch is perfectly sound. You could always back it with an intermediary stop knot. Reefing a furling headsail does require the clutch to take a load, although that's where you could back it with the existing cleat.

Just some further thinking, as I picture more horn cleats around the cockpit to be tangling magnets.
 

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Use a Harken 'hexaratchet' (with swivel and becket), mount it on or near the stern of the boat. Easy to control a loaded up line when it 'unfurls'; cleat the line off ... the hexaratchet does most of the 'holding'.
Harken
Exactly what I am doing. Works fine. Load on furling line is low. PO of course installed two different cleats for the furling line - both in wrong places.

Keep it simple .... a simple knot is all what is needed.

J
 

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What do you use that eye, near the horseshow, on the toerail for?

Perhaps attach a hexaratchet block there and then leading the line back to a horn clean mounted on the side of the teak combing near the winch will put it more in reach to the cockpit ?
 
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