SailNet Community banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That is the question. Whether to buy clevis pins made from 18-8 or buy pins made from 316 stainless. Also are cotter pins more secure than split rings for retaining the clevis pin?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think the pirates moved into the marine hardware business. Seems marine retailers want as much for one pin as McMaster-Carr wants for 5. The boat takes 3 different diameter pins, 3/8, 5/16 and 7/16. McMaster has the 3/8 in 316 stainless but only has the 5/16 and 7/16 in 18-8. A marine retailer, who will remain nameless, has the 5/16 and 7/16 but does not specify the grade. Me thinks its 18-8. So if I mix 316 and 18-8 will there be electrolysis corrosion or am I worrying about nothing?
 
  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
worry about nothing...most all marine retailers use 304 for hardware...especially pins, extenders, plates, toggles and the like

the only benefot of 316 especially the l variety is more resistance to corrosion...

however how hard is it to change a pin every 10 years or so?

if they are not specifying what grade exactly they are selling you I would recomend you get hardware from someone that at least tells you what grade and better yet what country

I have found that not all stainless steel from asia is crap

this is especially true of south korea...who make id say a good 50% or big chunk of rigging primary materials today for retailers

their wire is especially good too

dont buy the hype

this applies to generic stuff that westmarine sells...almost all of it is 304 and will surface stain in short order

however that doesnt mean its crap or that it will fail...304 just stains faster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
Galvanic corrosion is the result of different voltage potentials of different metals immersed in salt water. The voltage difference of 18-8 and 316 is very low. This will not cause galvanic corrosion to worry. Another point is that the pins are not always in water which means the circuit is rarely completed. Crevice corrosion on the other hand is possible, that is why we should use 316 when available.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
we can go off on this subject...but I wont at least

people often forget that 316 is more brittle, especially after welding or in sharp corners again 304 not as much...its also stronger per weight...and can take a bend or blow better without losing all its properties...however like mentioned it wont stay as shiny and or clean...

chose what you want here...

once crevice corrosion starts on ANY stainless if you dont check it it will snap on you this is especially true for holes and or bends or connections.

despite what people reccomend about x rays and all sorts of dye tricks to check on stainless steel for me the best method on stainless has always been the ring true method and a good magnifying glass...

if you can hit a chainplate for example with a hammer and you get a true ring or bell sound out of it its solid inside(remember stainless corrodes from the inside out might be perfectly shiny outside but cookie like inside) if you get a thud throw it in the trash!!!

if anyone is interested I have various pics of chainplates, extenders, rigging and hardware in 304 and 316 and compare them on my rebuild thread...I also have pics of nice very well made 304 plates.

for all the bad rap 304 gets and older stainless versus 316 its hard to argue with 40 year old chainplates, rigging and older rigging in general

im always amazed how rigging today is considered junk in less than 10 years to stay "safe" 5 if racing when stuff used to last 30, 40 years just fine

and lets not even get into galvanised rigging and hardware that lasts centuries...yet has a bad rap cause its not SHINY

remember folks...people like nice looking boats more than a practical boat...they want bling over seaworthiness so something that lasts longer shiny and wont "rust" is considered better than other said materials

in the end to each his own as I know this is a touchy subject


peace
 
  • Like
Reactions: casey1999

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Since we are talking about clevis pins, I'd like to ask if a common ss bolt would be suitable used as a clevis pin? Of course I mean using the unthreaded of the bolt, only.

The clevis pin that came with my boom support strut should be a bit longer than it is, and no clevis pin that I can find is long enough. So I've wondered about getting a long bolt, cutting to length and drilling a hole for the cotter pin.

But I've wondered if the bolt might be more likely to bend.

Any knowledge would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ggray, what are the dimensions of the pin? McMaster-Carr has one 6 1/2 inch long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After thinking some more, what you could do is buy a 316 ss rod of the proper diameter from one of the on line metal sellers, cut it to the length, place some washers between the cotter pin and the boom, should be ready to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,403 Posts
you are over thinking this. my boat has the same 18/8 3/8" bolt holding the boom on for the last 30 years and hundreds of jibes. you could lift the whole boat with a 3/8" bolt
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top