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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry to start a new thread on the well worn subject of reefing..but I have been googling and searching for at least an hour now and haven't found what I am thinking of :(

I remember reading about blocks that can be sewn in ? to the clew of a new construction main to aid in reefing. I seem remember the manufacturer wasn't one of the big ones. Anyone know?

If not, anyone have a good solution for blocks to attach to the clew?
 

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Sailboy-

Blocks aren't generally attached to the clew or leech of a sail. Occasionally, small blocks will be attached to the reefing cringles to lower the amount of friction in the reefing system. However, I'm not a big fan of them, since they can chafe the sail near the cringles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't like the idea of blocks either, however the product I saw served as a replacement to the cringle, probably less weight too.. Just can't remember! Had a backing piece which was somehow fixed to the clew, and incorporated a sheave somehow.
 

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What you saw was being developed Martin Van Breems, the inventor of the Dutchman. I was also interested in that reefing system, but after speaking with him several times, it seems that he's given up on it.
Marc
 

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Those blocks are kind cool.... I can see why you might want them. :)
 

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Ummm...the smallest block is for boats up to 60feet and uses a 50mm sheave running 14mm rope...I am not ure many of us here would need ot go up to the MEDIUM size!

:)
 

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Burnhad-

You need reefing cringles on the luff and leech, which act as the tack and clew of the reefed sail. If you have a block there, instead of a cringle, the reefing lines can run with far less friction and wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
..or for the offshore cruiser types less wear and chafe. Amazing how fast a seeming smooth cringle will chafe through 3/8" line under high load.
 

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Sailboy-

That's why you should put a short piece of line through the reefing cringles after using the reefing line to snug it down...to take the load off the reefing line and most of the chafe.
 

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Who says I don't???
well, if you're tying a separate short line through the cringle after you reef...why is your reefing line under a "high load"... stands to reason either you're not doing or you're doing something wrong. :rolleyes:
 

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Sailboy, I really beg your pardon on this, but it seems just another gizmo for nothing, really.

Please don't be mad, but what is wrong with the traditional cringle?? Been used for centuries...proven by thousands of crossings of the World...in millions of sails...

This is just more weight aloft, more stitching to the sail, and one more thing to fail when you less need it, more stuff to snag when folding the sail and more struff to hit you when the sail flaps...

Its just my opinion...
 

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Sailboy-

That's why you should put a short piece of line through the reefing cringles after using the reefing line to snug it down...to take the load off the reefing line and most of the chafe.
Where's the other end of this short piece of line go? Maybe my confusion comes from different rigging. My reefing line runs from a cleat on the mast, through the boom, and to a cringle on the leach of the main. The luff cringle gets attached to the boom by a hook on the gooseneck.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not sure about the weight aloft issue. Cringles weigh a fair amount. They really hurt when you get hit by them! My interest, no more than curiosity, is for use offshore. I'm thinking about the situations where you are reefed for days (yes, whole 24 hour periods of sailing) on end in exciting/trade wind conditions. This adds up to a lot of wear. Simply tying off the clew to the boom with another line doesn't ease the reefing lines work that much. It still has to function as an outhaul, which in 20-30 knots of wind is a considerable load. I'm assuming SD, the method you propose is the same used rigging a Laser outhaul?



As is I usually shorten the reefing lines (and halyards sometimes) a few inches for every month of use. Sta-set is much cheaper than clew blocks anyway!
 

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Depends on how much you shorten the lines. :) However, those blocks are fairly heavy—The smallest Clew block is over a pound...which is far heavier than a cringle. :)
As is I usually shorten the reefing lines (and halyards sometimes) a few inches for every month of use. Sta-set is much cheaper than clew blocks anyway!
 

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What's happened to Giu?

Sailboy, I really beg your pardon on this, but it seems just another gizmo for nothing, really.

Please don't be mad, but what is wrong with the traditional cringle??
Giu, that other post that unfairly tried to rake you seems to have changed you??? It was better when you "told it like it is". :p

And the purpose of this post is to say that I agree with . . .

This is just more weight aloft, more stitching to the sail, and one more thing to fail when you less need it, more stuff to snag when folding the sail and more struff to hit you when the sail flaps...
On my last boat I had single line reefing with blocks in the boom and because my boom was too small for a third block, my third reef had to be pulled down at the luff. I used a seperate downhaul for that and a block may have been useful to ease the effort required. My present boat has Batcars so no effort, no problem.

Andre
 
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