SailNet Community banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning a week trip sailing the fl keys in november and want to know what i have to have on board to be legal. I have a 22 ft boat with a 9.9 outboard. What is required such as fire extinguisher?, signalling flares?, horn? flotation devices? etc....

Also, what do I need as far as lights? Bi colored bow light, white stern and???...do i have to have a mast light?...what do i need as far as lights if i decide to anchor out over night?
 

·
Senior Moment
Joined
·
598 Posts
You might want to do a google search. A good place to start would be US Coast Guard Auxiliary or Power Squadron. Your local library likely has boating books, any number of which would have the pertinent data.

Besides the list you have above, a VHF radio and charts would be highly advisable as would a first aid kit, wood plugs for any thru hulls, if you don't already have these items.

michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
674 Posts
I am planning a week trip sailing the fl keys in november and want to know what i have to have on board to be legal. I have a 22 ft boat with a 9.9 outboard. What is required such as fire extinguisher?, signalling flares?, horn? flotation devices? etc....

Also, what do I need as far as lights? Bi colored bow light, white stern and???...do i have to have a mast light?...what do i need as far as lights if i decide to anchor out over night?

No offense, but while I applaud your seeking out information... I wonder why you don't already know most if not all of this. And I wonder if this shows a lack of experience in boating and seamanship. It just sounds like you bought a boat and are just going to hop on board and go cruising. I'm NOT one of those people who think you have to have years of training to leave the dock, but these pages are full of stories of folks who bit off more than they could chew. While I DON'T know what your experience level is, asking a question like this leads me to think you don't have much experience. I highly encourage you to sail in familiar waters as much as possible in different conditions for a while. And research requirements for a boat like yours. Try looking it up yourself. Asking everyone to tell you the answers isn't as good a teacher as learning it yourself.

Again, no offense intended. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
A good understanding of nav aides, bouys and lights, would be helpful. The ICW can be confusing as you may think you are traveling "the wrong way" if you can't distingush between the ICW bouys and the regular ones. Charts are a necessity, you can be finded heavily if you damage seagrass or coral. Also a Florida saltwater fishing license if you plan to fish. You can get one on line or by phone. Your boat must be registered and if you have a dingy with an outboard it must also be registered.
Richardsons has a chart book of the East Coast of Florida and the Keys including the Dry Tortugas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
You should Really consider a class on basic seamanship. These are frequently offered by many CG Aux and Power Squadrons and are very low cost. It has been awhile since I last attended one but as I recall it was about $25.00 and took about 2 or 3 evenings. Great Class and it will have all the answers to your questions PLUS lots you may not have know to ask.

Boating in the Florida Keys can be lots of fun, I've done it several times all the way from St. Augustine to Dry Tortuga's/ Fort Jefferson in small boats. It also is Not like a trip across a lake. Biscayne Bay can be like a high seas sail and short notice depending on fronts moving through. Depths vary greatly and you have lots of coral heads, week end power boaters and often some very large boats tossing up large wakes within narrow channels. This class will help you with much of this.

Also consider the purchase of a Waterways Guide of the Keys. Not sure which one is the best now but some great ones exist showing every mile of the waterway from Miami through the keys, what to see and what to avoid with good maps and way-point information. I'm speaking of a Marine guide not a road guide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
coast guard

I am planning a week trip sailing the fl keys in november and want to know what i have to have on board to be legal. I have a 22 ft boat with a 9.9 outboard. What is required such as fire extinguisher?, signalling flares?, horn? flotation devices? etc....

Also, what do I need as far as lights? Bi colored bow light, white stern and???...do i have to have a mast light?...what do i need as far as lights if i decide to anchor out over night?
The coast guard aux walked up to me on the dock last weekend and asked If I wanted to have a safety inspection. It was really helpful. They gave me some of the stickers I was missing, and pointed out that I only had one fire extinguisher instead of two, and that I needed a function anchor light whether or not I anchor at night.

Also the DMV here in CA has a book on boating that covers all the local laws and requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have taken a boating safety coarse administered by the wildlife commission in PA. But that was almost 10 yrs ago...and at the time i wasnt at all interested in sailing...all I cared about was getting my certification so i could operate a pwc...wish i paid more attention now...
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,703 Posts
If I remember correctly CG requires: One B-I fire extinguisher, PFD for all on board, Type IV PFD, bow R/G light, stern white light (or masthead tricolor), steaming light (midway up mast), anchor light, correct gas storage...am I forgetting anything?

However, you REALLY should have other basics: VHF, local charts, GPS, safety harness... and much more depending on your desired margin of safety and comfort. (like maybe and anchor!)

On the other hand, if you take all the advice from all the posts on this forum regarding cruising equipment, you would probably sink your boat! :D
 

·
Arf!
Joined
·
609 Posts
The coast guard aux walked up to me on the dock last weekend and asked If I wanted to have a safety inspection. It was really helpful. They gave me some of the stickers I was missing, and pointed out that I only had one fire extinguisher instead of two, and that I needed a function anchor light whether or not I anchor at night.

Also the DMV here in CA has a book on boating that covers all the local laws and requirements.
They were in error. The USCG Nav Rules do not require a masthead light except when it must be illuminated when anchoring outside an established anchorage at night. Look here:

Navigation Rules
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,378 Posts
They were in error. The USCG Nav Rules do not require a masthead light except when it must be illuminated when anchoring outside an established anchorage at night. Look here:

Navigation Rules
The masthead light is commonly called a steaming light (225 degree white). It is commonly about 2/3 the way up the mast. The anchor light is a 360 degree white. It does not have to be at the top of the mast.

Definitions
(a) "Masthead light" means a white light placed over the fore and aft centre line of the vessel showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 225 degrees and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to 22.5 degrees abaft the beam on either side of the vessel.
There is nothing to indicate that an anchor is required only outside anchorages. It is required whenever you are anchored from dusk to dawn.

You might want to read the page you referenced.

Anchored Vessels

AT NIGHT: All vessels at anchor must display anchor lights. If your vessel is less than 164 feet/50 meters in length, then its anchor light is an all-round white light visible where it can best be seen from all directions.
Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,378 Posts

·
Arf!
Joined
·
609 Posts
I did read the page referenced!

The masthead light is commonly called a steaming light (225 degree white). It is commonly about 2/3 the way up the mast. The anchor light is a 360 degree white. It does not have to be at the top of the mast.



There is nothing to indicate that an anchor [light] is required only outside anchorages. It is required whenever you are anchored from dusk to dawn.

You might want to read the page you referenced.



Jack
Here is a direct quote from the same page:

EXCEPTIONS: If your vessel is less than 23 feet/7 meters in length, then it is not required to display an anchor light or shape unless it is anchored in or near a narrow channel, fairway or anchorage, or where other vessels normally navigate.
If your vessel is less than 65.6 feet/20 meters in length, then it is not required to display an anchor light if it is anchored in Inland Waters in a special anchorage designated by the Secretary of Transportation.

To me, the underlined text means that it is marked on charts as an anchorage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,378 Posts
The key phrase is inland waters. The OP asked about coastal cruising.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
It may be coastal cruising but we have plenty of protected and inland designated anchorages in the Florida Keys. When you anchor in those anchorages, it is not neccesary to energize an anchor light although some people still do. Better safe than sorry, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
The key phrase is inland waters. The OP asked about coastal cruising.
Portions of the waters in the Florida Keys are considered inlnad waters. I don't have my chart handy but I believe it is mainly on the gulf side. The ICW, which runs through the keys, is also considered inland waters under USGC regulations.
As I said before it can be confusing, which is why I would join the others who have replied in recommending to the OP that they take a course to learn at least some basic deck navigation and chart work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
The key phrase is inland waters. The OP asked about coastal cruising.
Portions of the waters in the Florida Keys are considered inland waters. I don't have my chart handy but I believe it is mainly on the gulf side. The ICW, which runs through the keys, is also considered inland waters under USGC regulations.
As I said before it can be confusing, which is why I would join the others who have replied in recommending to the OP that they take a course to learn at least some basic deck navigation and chart work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
I'm going coastal myself, from Chesapeake up to Maine, and I made up a little excel spreadsheet that some of you may find useful. Given initial and terminal lat/long, it computes distance in nm and initial course -- true, magn, and adjusted with deviation for two compasses. It does not seem that I can attach the file here, but I can email it if you like. I'm a new member so I'm not allowed to list my email, not enough posts.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top