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Discussion Starter #1
Considering refreshing the wearing paint but could use some advice. Probably can't paint until spring given the weather but figure I can do some prep in the cold. Also need to keep the boat near working since we go back in the water early (April), so can't just remove all equipment. I need to rebed a few items so will be removing some equipment anyway.

Deck and cockpit have mix of glossy and nonskid.

What is the prep process?

Are people happy with Interdeck?

Is taping sufficient for equipment that will not be removed?


Josh
 

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I'd be interested in this as well, planning to redo my cockpit and deck this spring
 

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I have been using Interdeck for some years. Easy to paint, works fine but
- fades in the sun, re-painting is needed after some years if one want the original color.
- soft so wears down

Also, at least in my area, Interdeck is no longer available in all colors, in particular not in the one I first used, which I still prefer.

Two component paint is usually stronger, but also much more difficult to apply. Awlgrip is often mentioned is giving good results, both glossy and non-skid, but I do not have any experience of it.

On balance, I am rather satisfied with Interdeck.

Preparation: sanding!

Good luck!
 

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Also satisfied with Interdeck, esp the 'grip', but it does tend to 'hold onto' dirt. Easy to apply - yes it changes colour with time but in our case now closely matches the rest of our deck (was much whiter to start with but has 'yellowed nicely' ;)) Pretty sure that Interdeck is just 'Brightsides' with grit so you should be able to blend some colours for a few more options...

Think you can mask around equipment that you can't/don't remove, but better to get under it if you can. On a past project we removed everything but the toerails and winches, taped off around those.

If you have a molded nonskid pattern it can be difficult to properly prepare.. if you don't want to preserve it I guess you could sand/grind it smooth and start over. Otherwise the best prep you can do might be a thorough TSP scrub followed by a solvent wash. If you do use Interdeck it will likely 'hide' the original pattern.

Many here rave about the results using Kiwi Grip, and I've seen some nice results too - it's also tintable to your colour so before committing to Interdeck maybe check that out first.

Non 'nonskid' areas should be sanded properly, cleaned and then probably 'rolled and tipped' unless you're able to spray. You can get a reasonable DIY result with the HVLP blower/spraygun setup that bathtub refinishers use.
 

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Two component paint is usually stronger, but also much more difficult to apply.
I can endorse either one or two part Petit paints for doing the whole topside area. While one part (EZPoxy) is maybe 40% cheaper, I can't really say that the two part (EZPoxy2) is really any harder to work with and is considerably more impact and abrasion resistant.

While sanding before the first coat and between coats 2 or even 3 is very important, it is critical that, before you do any sanding, you thoroughly wipe down the entire area with a prep coat which will remove any and all traces of grease and (most importantly) residual wax and polish. If you don't do this, there will be adhesion problems.

Modern epoxy paints are very easy to work with and give great coverage and gloss. If you are going to use a different color or additive grit for the non-skid areas, do the gloss areas first (2 or 3 coats) and then tape off on the cured gloss area to do the non-skid.

If you are using the same color and not using a grit, you will only need to tape anything that can easily be removed. This gives you an easy justification for rebedding all of your deck hardware that is removed for painting easy with butyl tape.

Murph

S/V Amalia
1965 Cal 30
Muskegon, MI

Doing the Loop in 2015
 

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I have always used DuPont PrepSol

There are probably lots of products like this from all paint manufacturer's, but I would use those solvents that are specifically designed for this kind of cleaning and surface preparation.

One can will last for quite a few paint jobs.

Murph
 

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I used the 2 part interlux Perfection and was really pleased with the results and didn't find it all that hard to apply. I never painted a boat before, so was the first time doing the roll and tip method. obviously, prep is the most important part. I took the time and filled in all the gouges with Pettet 2 part marine filler and sanded smooth. Sanding is the key after filling. Run your fingers over the patch with your eyes closed. If you feel a bump, need more sanding, or else is shows in the finished product.

A couple of tips on the roll and tip method. I used standard foam rollers from Home Depot. Key was using a Badger hair paint brush. Need to keep in clean and wet. Keep all the paint off of it. Dip the brush into thinner and then shake out well before tipping. That way the brush glides over the paint very smoothly.

Don't get in a hurry and don't set a deadline. Do what you can do and then do more the next day (or weekend). When you start hurrying, is when it get sloppy.
 

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Will look better, and keep water out better, if you remove the deck hardware. However, if it is bedded well, and taped carefully, I have seen this look pretty good. You could just sand enough to get good adhesion, IF, the underlying paint is not peeling or flaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all of the advice. A few additional data points:

1. My current non-skid is a embossed waffle diamond pattern. The pattern is in good shape and appears to be painted with a flat paint that didn't contain grit. Guessing there is the original and the current coat. Current coat was likely done by a PO. Very light tan along the lines of Interlux Sand Beige and Bristol Beige).


2. Cockpit surfaces and other deck surfaces are a mix of glossy and flat white. Generally the flat is on areas where you might step (coamings, cockpit seating, etc.) and glossy are on vertical surfaces such as the companionway and vertical walls of the cockpit well.

Based on all of the advice and reading online, here is my current gameplan:

1. Thoroughly wash surfaces prior to sanding. Remove as much deck hardware as I can stand. Sand existing painted surfaces with 80 grit, 120 grit, and finally 220 grit. Wipe with acetone in between and when finished

2. Fill and sand any dings, crack, etc.

3. Prep existing non-skid pattern with a cupped wire brush to remove/scuff existing paint. Maybe a light sand on top of the pattern to scuff but I think I want to preserve the pattern.

3b. Paint with primer depending on product choice

4. Paint cockpit with appropriate white/off white with flattner for non-gloss areas

5. Paint non-skid with Interdeck or similar.

I would like some rougher texture in addition to the diamond pattern but would prefer not to obliterate the diamond pattern. Also don't want too much roughness since the kids play around on deck while at anchor. Don't have a great idea how aggressive the various non-skid textures are. Read about someone adding glass blasting beads to adjust coarseness.

Josh
 

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I am surprised that no one mentioned Kiwigrip for the non-skid. I have concluded that Kiwigrip is the hot ticket for non-skid, especially for the DIY crowd. I am also a big believer in two part epoxy high build primer if you are painting the original gelcoat since tends to fill pin holes and micro cracks preventing read though.

Jeff
 

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I am surprised that no one mentioned Kiwigrip for the non-skid. I have concluded that Kiwigrip is the hot ticket for non-skid, especially for the DIY crowd.
See post #4 ;)

I am also a big believer in two part epoxy high build primer if you are painting the original gelcoat since tends to fill pin holes and micro cracks preventing read though.

Jeff
+ 1
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've read great things about KiwiGrip. Would probably use it if I was going to get rid of the diamond pattern. I've heard KiwiGrip texture is pretty aggressive and will hide lots of stuff including both blemishes and patterns.

I am painting over at least one coat of paint on top o gelcoat. Read that the two part epoxies can act like solvents which might impact adhesion if any old paint is still around so I am leaning toward the one part formulas that are more compatible with existing coatings... Or so I've read

Josh
 

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I don't think Interdeck is going to leave your original pattern visible either.. Suspect it will fill the valleys of the surface already there.
 

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I don't think Interdeck is going to leave your original pattern visible either.. Suspect it will fill the valleys of the surface already there.
Well ... could it be that on European boats the non-slip pattern is still there even after some 2-3 layers of paint, whereas on American ... no, no that cannot be the case. Anyhow, my non-skid pattern is very apparent.

Further, if one wants to use a glossy paint on non-skid (and other matt areas) one should get "non-gloss" additive, which actually is available for the Interlux 2-component series. Note, that if going for 2 layers then the first layer should not have the non-gloss added, just the final layer.

A science of itself all this.

/J
 

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Prep for mono or bi-part paints is essentially the same. You will need to wipe down with solvent after sanding. That will likely take care of -or at least indicate - any incompatible substrates. We used two part Interlux for our deck & cockpit about a dozen years ago. It now needs re-doing. The interim touch-ups we've done have been with Brightsides and Interdeck. The Brightsides seems to fail after a season, needing re-prepping and re-coating to keep it looking presentable. Interdeck holds up better, but as some have mentioned, can be difficult to keep looking clean. If you want to not paint every season, go with the two-part paint. It is a bit more finicky about temperature and humidity conditions than the others, but it lasts about ten times longer. For us, getting ten years of good looking paint was worth waiting a few weeks for the right painting conditions to happen.
 

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I painted cockpit and deck with leftover white Brightsides. Existing beige was original from 1981, dirty, dusty and hairline cracks. Wiped down with acetone, sanded, wiped down again with acetone, rinsed with clear water. Rolled and tipped both smooth and non-skid.
Observations:
1. White is WAYYYY too bright and shows every speck of dirt. I still have to finish the sides with plexi windows and stanchions in the way and I will do those areas with beige first. I will then redo the smooth white parts of the deck with beige and eventually the cockpit as well. Will redo the non-skid with contrasting colour. Most of my deck is non-skid.
2. Two coats on the non-skid barely affected the non-skid...it will still skin your knees if you fall.
3. I taped most hardware....what a PITA...and it still leaked under the tape. Birghtsides is as thin as 2% milk.
4. Cockpit is very much a PITA to do with limited space and have to do two coats on four different sessions so that you do not paint yourself into corner.
 

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Original ugly beige
Half way white cockpit
Cockpit all white
Looks pretty nice!

On our previous boat we repainted stem to stern, keel to truck. We went with white on deck, Awlgrip with griptex on non skid.

Never minded the 'bright white' on deck - if it's sunny you ought to be wearing good sunglasses anyway - and it's MUCH cooler underfoot than any other colour - even a 'light' gray can get uncomfortably hot under bare feet on a hot day.
 
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