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Hi All,

The Admiral and I went out for a motor cruise last week... sunny day, no wind and 48 F. Towards the end of our 4 hour outing, we were both getting cold (sun was going down fast as was the temperature). We both had on long john's and sweaters and med weight jackets. The Admiral is not fond of going out winter sailing due to the cold. I have to agree with her, add 10-15k of wind on to 40F temps and it's going to be cold!

I'm after cold weather sailing gear recomendations that WON'T break the bank. :eek: My sailing brethren from the PNW... Thanks.

Dave
 

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Layers is the key and proper head gear is a must. Stay away from cotton and other materials that absorb water.

You don't need to spend a fortune, get some good smart wool socks, something light and waterproof as your outermost layer (Goretex is good), The middle layer/s are less important and can be removed as you get too warm.
 

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Well with 10 to 15 knots think apparent wind it won't be nearly so bad! Newer syntheics are best that I have found. The other thing with fleece you really do get what you pay for. I am not sure why but I have one Columbia (not a real expensive one, but not cheap either) is much warmer than a thicker one from the Gap(really cheap, like $14 on sale). I have been happy with Mountain Hardware that if you have a Gander Mountain is often on clearance towards the end of the season. I normally pick up a few things about now for the rest of the winter and next.

I really think getting stuff off season is the best way to get good cold weather gear cheap. It starts going down around now but by easter it is really cheap. It does not really go out of style (at least for me) so I don't care if it was last years. Ski shops are good too, thought much of it is not really very warm because when you ski you are more active that your are when sailing. Sierra trading post has great prices on warm stuff as well. Ski shops often reduce there stuff very low towards the end of the season becuase they often market to a more style concerned market than sailing, heck most sailors are wareing the exact same shoes they did in the 1940's or something.

Also foul weather gear makes a good top layer becuase it really stops the wind better than most things. Even just throwing a Grundens jacket over a warm coat can really help cut the wind.
 

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those stores you were mentioning around the end of winter go in and look for clearance sections if your looking for price. if your looking for warmth your going to have to sacrifice a few bucks.
 

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The Admiral and I went out for a motor cruise last week... sunny day, no wind and 48 F. Towards the end of our 4 hour outing, we were both getting cold (sun was going down fast as was the temperature). We both had on long john's and sweaters and med weight jackets. The Admiral is not fond of going out winter sailing due to the cold. I have to agree with her, add 10-15k of wind on to 40F temps and it's going to be cold!
Ski pants are often waterproof and well insulated and work great. That is what I have non-sailing friends bring when we go sailing in the winter.

If you don't already have ski pants of some flavor and can't find a used pair at Goodwill or Second Ascent then these pants from Fisheries are very nice and what I use:
Gage Burning Daylight Pant

When it is cold (high in the lower 40s or colder) I'll wear heavy (300g/m^2) wool long johns underneath. When it is a bit warmer I'll wear lighter wool long johns.

Up above I just wear layers with a Goretex or eVent shell on top. My sailing "go bag" has an extra layer of wool long johns top and bottom and multiple pairs of gloves.

I keep multiple pairs of these gloves:
Insulated PVC Vinyl Glove - Gloves | Fisheries Supply

and these gloves:
Memphis CN9690M Ninja Ice Nylon Gloves, Medium - [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@41U9KN69gxL

On the boat and in the sailing bag. The second pair are a bit warmer and have better dexterity, but will eventually wet through if it is raining. The former are dry in all conditions.

I keep older "worn out" soft shells, fleece and rain jackets on the boat in a variety of sizes as loaner gear.

A hat and warm boots are other keys. If you keep your hands, feet, and head warm then your torso will also stay warm.

My boat also has cabin heat (Webasto forced hot air) and I'll turn that on when it is really cold so that someone can hang out below and warm up if necessary.
 

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Just went to local dive shop. They now make jacket and bibs in coated fleece lined neoprene. Company is " stormr" $200 for the jacket. Today is 40s with freezing rain. Warm as toast and dry with just a shirt under. Will wear instead of musto .Bride bought jacket and bibs.
 

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Sierra is a great place to find deals. You have to look off season.
The hardest thing I've always had trouble w/ is keeping my feet warm. That is until I discovered Dubarry. Worth every penny.
Jim
 

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A few of my winter ideas here:

Sail Delmarva: Winter Sailing

* Wind pants+ fleece are much warmer than long johns. I'm a believer in covering the legs nearly as well as the torso.

* Balacava, often worn under another hat.

* Separate gloves for handling wet lines (Freezer gloves are good for this, or gardening gloves). Then put on dry ones.

* Keep ski goggles on board, just in case. Much warmer than sunglasses.

* Fleece socks.
 

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When I used to race frostbite, I wore UnderArmour long johns, top and bottom, a couple of shirts and a Musto Windstopper jacket. I wore sock liners under waterproof socks and Ronstan neoprene racing boots. I wore glove liners under my regular racing gloves. And of course, an auto inflating PFD. Seemed to do the trick. I also put moisturizing lotion on my entire body before putting on the clothes. I don't remember what my logic was, but I remember that it helped.
 

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For me the hardest part is keeping hands and feet warm. I eventually found a good pair or Columbia waterproof gloves at a reasonable price, but boots were something else. After a lot of internet searching I finally bit the bullet and mortgaged the house and purchased a pair of Dubarry's which have performed as promised keeping my toes tingly. My sailing is out of Victoria and i will certainly be sailing in January
 

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I don't doubt that the Dubarry's are good but the OP specifically wanted recommendations that wouldn't break the bank. $400 boots are a bank breaker for most of us.
 

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The best investment I made for cold weather sailing was the $700 I spent on having a local guy in the Florida Keys fabricate a full, clear plastic enclosure for the cockpit. There were times when the temperature was a brisk 42 degrees, winds howling at 25 to 30 and spray coming over the bow. Inside the enclosure, on sunny days, the temperature was 70 to 75 degrees and I was sailing in shirt sleeves. It was wonderful. And I had the enclosure set up so I could easily handle the main and jib sheets without opening anything to get to them. As for foul weather gear, I had an insulated deer hunting coverall outfit, but believe me, after 6 hours in the cold and spray you were chilled to the bone and couldn't stop shivering. Some folks will tell you that sailing in an enclosure isn't really sailing, or offers some handicaps - those of us that use them will tell you they are the best thing since sliced bread.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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In addition to fleece, wind breaker, cap, thick wool socks and warm gloves, the key item for me is either a turtle neck under garment or a fleecy scarf to wrap around the neck to keep that warm air in/cold air out.
 

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I find for both skiing and sailing, a pair of bib rain pants help a LOT! Along with some kind of good wind breaker.

Then as others have said, layers! Make sure you coat and pants fit over these "FAT" clothes! As both of you will probably want a size or two larger coat than you might normally wear, as you will gain some bulk wearing these layers!

Gloves are tough to find imho that will work while sailing. Ski gloves work well if motoring.....Have not tried sailing as of yet.

Then a hat of some sort depending upon the temps etc. Cover the ears, dry if spray is around. Wool stocking style hat if sunny. OH, Do not forget sun glass's if it is sunny. It is still bright on the water in the middle of winter! Some will even use goggles if it is windy and wet enough!

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter #17
For me the hardest part is keeping hands and feet warm. I eventually found a good pair or Columbia waterproof gloves at a reasonable price, but boots were something else. After a lot of internet searching I finally bit the bullet and mortgaged the house and purchased a pair of Dubarry's which have performed as promised keeping my toes tingly. My sailing is out of Victoria and i will certainly be sailing in January
Thanks Norten,

Nice looking boat. Hang out with us more often! One of my sailing adventures is to get to your playground. Cheers!
 

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I dress similarly for most outdoor winter activities, with minor variations depending on the activity and adding/subtracting under-layers depending on temp (though 48 is hardly winter weather here). Outer gore-tex shell top and bottom, non-cotton layer(s) beneath. You also did not mention wearing a hat, which is essential to staying warm.

Over the years I have outfitted a large part of my wife, son and my outerwear from this website Sierra Trading Post - Great Deals. Great Brands.. often at discounts of 50% or more.

Good outerwear is not cheap but will last a lifetime so well worth it in the end. Most good companies offer a lifetime warranty for anything that does break like zippers or seams coming undone. And, heck, you live in the PNW -- isn't it a requirement to have good gore-tex outerwear to even visit that side of the state?
 

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I bike commute year-round, this morning it was -9ºF, so I have a pretty good inventory of cold-weather gear. I second what people have been saying about keeping the extremities warm. A good hat that blocks the wind and covers the ears is important. Thick wool socks are nice, but good boots are nicer. I have some Solomons that are waterproof and toasty warm. Good waterproof gloves are a must.

I think the biggest bang for you buck would probably come from a good hat.
 

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Jim, You're not that far away from where my boat is sitting on the hard right now in Perryville, MD. There are lots of folks from the Philly suburbs that keep their boats at the marina where I'm at. Just Email me at [email protected] and I'll be glad to meet up with you and show the enclosure to you. The total cost of materials was about $300, including all the snaps, Industrial strength Velcro and twist locks. The guy that made it for me did the job in two short days. One day to make some measurements and one day to put it in place. I watched him fit the enclosure to the bimini top and he was definitely a master at his craft. He made very few cuts in the clear vinyl, did most all the cuts with big scissors, drilled a few holes for the snaps, then double sewed the Velcro strips to be safe. It's strong as iron, and toasty warm inside the cockpit during the coldest weather. When the sun is out, it's just like sailing in a greenhouse. Sometimes it actually got too warm and I had to remove one of the panels to let some cold air in. On the trip home there were a couple other boats making their way back north on the ICW as well. They said they thought they would freeze to death and those guys were wearing Carhartt coveralls that construction workers wear in the coldest weather to keep warm.

When the sun is not out, a small, propane camp heater does an incredible job inside the cockpit, and there's sufficient air flowing through the seams to prevent the heater from consuming all the oxygen, but not enough to allow the heat to escape.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
 
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