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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone here has installed a composite wood type toe rail like trex or plastik or any other name brand company? just wondering how it was to work with best way to do it and where to buy from. I have to replace my toe rail because its old and rotted like 90% of this boat and dont have to time to refinish all wood toe rails and like that there is little to no maintenance on the composite deck board type stuff.

pics of what you did are good to see im a visual learner
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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damn, I shoulda' taken pictures!
A few years ago I used some white 1" x 2" Trex to replace the rotten wooden rub rails on a dyer dhow dinghy; one piece of 1"x2" on the inside and another outside the hull. I used screws to attach them to each other and of course lots of clamps to bend them into position. This repair is still holding up from what I hear.
I bought the Trex at a home depot store and did not shop around for it as I only needed 3 - 8' lengths for the job.
I'm sorely tempted to try the same on my Tartan 27' which has Teak toe/rub rails all around as we seem to need to replace at least one section per season due to cracking and checking.
 

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When it is time for me to get new toe rails I am going with extruded aluminum perf rail. It is so much more useful than wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
oh trust me alex thats want i wanted to do but the wife says its ugly looking :D

i was thinking the same as you caleb if you can get me a pic it would be great i was gonna bond 2 pieces together with epoxy and screws then router the corner to make it look fancy. if they made 2x3 square end that would be ideal for me because i would just route a grove to fit it to the edge of the deck then screw it in place. i need to come up with something soon as i have to redo my deck hull joint in the next few weeks and rebed my hardware
 

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I wouldn't use it. Too many problems with the wood content. Other, more stable stuff is available
 

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I've used the plastic wood composites for several projects around the house (trim); not quite happy with it. I've noticed it has a huge expansion and contraction rate. Over the course of a year about a half inch for 12 feet. It's one thing if it was shrinkage; it's not, come summer the gaps will close up.
I'll stick with the aluminum toe rail.
 

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Couple things:
1) Most plastics have a fairly high rate of expansion in sunlight, you may well end up with a "wavy" cap rail?
2) How is the current cap attached? Is it screwed and bunged? Do any of the current production builders through bolt the caps or T -track? If it's an older boat it may be through bolted, if it's through bolted do you have access to all the bolts? Can you save the cap rail for a pattern or will it be destroyed with removal?

Replacing a cap rail is an extensive project, make sure you know what you're getting into.

Just wondering if anyone here has installed a composite wood type toe rail like trex or plastik or any other name brand company? just wondering how it was to work with best way to do it and where to buy from. I have to replace my toe rail because its old and rotted like 90% of this boat and dont have to time to refinish all wood toe rails and like that there is little to no maintenance on the composite deck board type stuff.

pics of what you did are good to see im a visual learner
 

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Just wondering if anyone here has installed a composite wood type toe rail like trex or plastik or any other name brand company? just wondering how it was to work with best way to do it and where to buy from. I have to replace my toe rail because its old and rotted like 90% of this boat and dont have to time to refinish all wood toe rails and like that there is little to no maintenance on the composite deck board type stuff.

pics of what you did are good to see im a visual learner
The composites are hard to work with for this application as there will be many scarfs. Also, no sure if you'll be able to plug the screws...

Since you are at the hull-deck joint, why not fair and paint where the old toerail was and build bulwarks instead? They are elegant and practical, as they are off the deck, secured by brackets and the water just runs out...
You can use any kind of hard wood on its edge (Iroko, Cumaru, etc), say, 1"X3", and it will a lot easier to maintain, you can paint or varnish.

This is one example:
Far Reach Voyages Home Page
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I like the look of that a lot from the link.. But now I gotta glass my hull deck joint

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
 

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Most wood/plastic composite (WPC) products comprise a 50/50 blend of wood (as wood flour) to plastic (polyethylene) plus a few top secret additives. Knowing exactly how it's made and what it's made of, I'm not convinced you'd have too many issues so long as you used the quality stuff and checked a sample for expansion before you charged ahead.

Cutting plugs for the screws is a breeze because the 'texture' is imprinted during manufacture so, unlike real timber, there are (or should be) simply no variations from length to length. No special tools are required and the sawdust is no more hazardous than ordinary timber dust.

It isn't necessarily stuff cheap though..
 

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Most wood/plastic composite (WPC) products comprise a 50/50 blend of wood (as wood flour) to plastic (polyethylene) plus a few top secret additives. Knowing exactly how it's made and what it's made of, I'm not convinced you'd have too many issues so long as you used the quality stuff and checked a sample for expansion before you charged ahead.

Cutting plugs for the screws is a breeze because the 'texture' is imprinted during manufacture so, unlike real timber, there are (or should be) simply no variations from length to length. No special tools are required and the sawdust is no more hazardous than ordinary timber dust.

It isn't necessarily stuff cheap though..
Most of the new plastic wood decking products on the market are 100% PVC and does not contain wood fibers as the older polyethylene blend materials
the PVC material can also be glued
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Most of the new plastic wood decking products on the market are 100% PVC and does not contain wood fibers as the older polyethylene blend materials
the PVC material can also be glued
Not sure where you're looking, because all the manufacturers I know of WPC products use 40-50% wood in their products used primarily for decking and screening sold into the building industry. Perhaps you're thinking of that flexible sheeting rubbish? I (and the OP I believe) am referring to wood composite..

Anything without at least 30% wood flour in it certainly isn't quality WPC.
 

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I bought a truckload of used Trex decking for ten dollars a few years ago and used some of it for rub rails on a 28 ft work boat I own, just ran it through the table saw and sanded it lightly, three years now and it still looks good and has held up at least as well as the wood that preceded it (white oak).
 
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