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One of our main reasons for getting a composting head was that pump outs seem to be spotty here on the Chesapeake, especially in the more out of the way areas. We haven't had any odor or bug issues (knock on wood) and find it to be a great solution for weekend warriors like us.

Where I can't see it working well is for longer term cruisers, mainly because of the small liquid holding capacity. Two of us fill ours in about a day and a half. Extra tanks are available, but is anybody really going to dinghy 3 or 4 of them ashore every few days? The liquid can also be directed to a larger holding tank, but that really starts to defeat the purpose. I'm not sure there's an easy way to no discharge compliance if you're going to be out for more than one or two liquid tanks worth of days.
The Chessy is probably one of the toughest places to manage a holding tank. Anyone in the upper Bay is a day and half away from clearing the NDZ. If you have to pump out 100% of the time, that would be a pain. Composters could be a good solution, you just can't say they are without their downsides too. Around here, I pass outside the 3 mile limit nearly every weekend...... intentionally.
I have read that Air Head will modify the liquid tank to drain into your existing holding tank. While this then requires you to find a pump out, it would make your range much further. I imagine you would need to use some sort of deodorant product as I imagine it would get stinky. I doubt the sugar they recommend adding to the collection jug would do much for a holding tank.

I was looking at a house that was about 50 foot from the Hudson River, and it had a bad septic tank, so my solution was going to go composting toilets. I figured there was no way the EPA/BOH would give a leach field approval that close to the water. And it certainly would have been cheaper than a raised Leach field, that was estimated to start at $20,000 and go up quickly from there. Though I was looking at the Sunmar as they are not dry toilets.
 

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Its a fact of life here on the Chessie. Do we want our crabs or do we want them embargo because of high fecal chloroform levels. I have never really found it that difficult to find a place to pump out when traveling here. I am fortunate where I keep my boat has one, but the alternative of dumping into the Bay is not an alternative to me.
I agree, although, I've eaten my last crab anyway. They're a bigger pain than pumping out. :)

However, how many boaters on the Chessy do you think make the occasional exception? I highly suspect its higher than anyone will admit. Not excusing it.
 

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It is interesting the positive comments come from people that have a composting head and the negative opinions come from those that don't.
That is self-evident. However, I don't see those with flush heads suggesting their method is without downside, while the composters usually do. I've read more than once composter who has ripped the bloody thing out of their boat, but they can't seem to understand any downside.
 

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That is self-evident. However, I don't see those with flush heads suggesting their method is without downside, while the composters usually do. I've read more than once composter who has ripped the bloody thing out of their boat, but they can't seem to understand any downside.
When a composting toilet's problems are such that would cause them to be ripped out the problem us usually do to operator error.
I know the reasons that people like composting heads (as well as the reason's people replaced a composting head from one manufacturer with a composting head from another). So to be fair I would like to hear the reasons from the people who "ripped out" their composting heads as to why they ripped out their heads, how they operated their head, what they replaced and what replaced them....and if they were happy with those....some people are not happy if things on a boat don't behave the same way as they do on land.
 

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On land composting toilets are another expensive "green gadget"
But they actually make sense on boats (one of the few marine things that are significantly cheaper than the land version).
I have an "Air Head" sitting in my forward cabin ready to install.
Actually on land is where they make the most sense to me, for remote areas, or for vehicles.
On a boat, sure they are an option, but on land in some cases, the only good option at all.

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
 

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Actually on land is where they make the most sense to me, for remote areas, or for vehicles.
On a boat, sure they are an option, but on land in some cases, the only good option at all.

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
The space on my boat where I can put a head (the cabin trunk extends 12" ahead of the mast to give sitting headroom on the head) is relatively small, originally it had a "proper head" with holding tank, etc.....that took up alot of storage space and the last owner replaced it with a port-i-pottie, the composting head is far superior to a port-i-pottie and takes up the same "foot print". For my boat the composting head makes the most sense. Because of the fact it is 6" taller than the port-i-pottie I loose the single berth in the forward cabin, but you wouldn't want to sleep up there at sea anyway.
 

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When a composting toilet's problems are such that would cause them to be ripped out the problem us usually do to operator error.
I know the reasons that people like composting heads (as well as the reason's people replaced a composting head from one manufacturer with a composting head from another). So to be fair I would like to hear the reasons from the people who "ripped out" their composting heads as to why they ripped out their heads, how they operated their head, what they replaced and what replaced them....and if they were happy with those....some people are not happy if things on a boat don't behave the same way as they do on land.
There was one story posted earlier in this thread. I doubt infestation was operator error. I'm also sure it isn't common. There was at least one other member of this forum that I recall having deep regrets over their composter. They will have to speak for themselves.

Here's a reality check:

Do you like your composting toilet? | MNN - Mother Nature Network
 

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There was one story posted earlier in this thread. I doubt infestation was operator error. I'm also sure it isn't common. There was at least one other member of this forum that I recall having deep regrets over their composter. They will have to speak for themselves.

Here's a reality check:

Do you like your composting toilet? | MNN - Mother Nature Network
That "reality check" was a problem cause by the urine collector being filled beyond capacity.....that falls under user error (one that I have also made with "pee jugs" )
Heads, as with any other component on a boat....what works under some circumstances, budgets, boats and individual people may work differently with others.
 

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That "reality check" was a problem cause by the urine collector being filled beyond capacity.....that falls under user error (one that I have also made with "pee jugs" )
Heads, as with any other component on a boat....what works under some circumstances, budgets, boats and individual people may work differently with others.
Read to the end. They were not impressed by the composting of the turd laid just prior to emptying that either.

I thought it was a balanced pro/con article. Not against, just honestly discussing the downside too.
 

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Friends simply dump the solids into a large plastic garbage bag and throw it in a dumpster. No pumpout needed.
 

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Friends simply dump the solids into a large plastic garbage bag and throw it in a dumpster. No pumpout needed.
The sales rep for Air Head (which has about the same dimensions as Natures Head) pointed out that the bags designed for trash compactors (a standard size) fit perfectly over the bottom half of the air head.
 

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We have a C-Head, our first loo in our homemade boat, and so far, in 9 months of light use, couldn't be more pleased. The simplicity of design, the ease of keeping it clean, the fact that its few parts can be easily, locally and cheaply replaced, make it excellent for our needs. We don't need to buy a big expensive custom jug for the urine, (just screw on the cap and put another clean gallon jug in its place. next time we go ashore, we take the full jug in a grocery sack, and empty it into a toilet, or dump it in the woods. It IS sterile, after all.)
At $500,it is hard to beat the price of the rig, and frankly, I don't care where the nearest pump out is, how much it costs, etc. When the fiber/poop mixture seems hard to turn, the contents are emptied into an ordinary 5-gallon bucket, which is ventilated, where further drying takes place. Composted? Not really, I suppose. but dried into an entirely odorless lumpy mix that can be tied up in a plastic bag and chucked, less offensively than cat litter or used Pampers. Or a permanent lid can be fastened on it, and chucked, and by the time THAT decomposes, the contents will be the least of our problems. As for me, I plan to start a long-term compost bin not too far from our dock, well hidden by azaleas, which should be happy to have it.
It is easy, needs no nasty chemicals, no emergency 'unauthorized-deposits'-caused tear-downs, and has, so far, no odor at all. No bugs, either. I may have to eat my words some hot summer day, but that day hasn't come yet.
 

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One surprise was that TP seems to float on the surface of the COIR/peat, rather than being drawn down into the mixture. We deal with that by letting it dry and from time to time, plucking it out, putting it into a plastic bag, and chucking it with the rest of the garbage. It hasn't been a problem the way a sewage-soaked plastic hose would be to me, or repairing a jammed mascerator would be.

The other thing that takes some getting used to, at least for male mariners, is that EVERYBODY sits to use this thing. If they don't, ain't NObody gonna be happy with the soggy results. So, deal with it, friend. Cooperate or head for the lee rail.
 

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One surprise was that TP seems to float on the surface of the COIR/peat, rather than being drawn down into the mixture. We deal with that by letting it dry and from time to time, plucking it out, putting it into a plastic bag, and chucking it with the rest of the garbage. It hasn't been a problem the way a sewage-soaked plastic hose would be to me, or repairing a jammed mascerator would be.

The other thing that takes some getting used to, at least for male mariners, is that EVERYBODY sits to use this thing. If they don't, ain't NObody gonna be happy with the soggy results. So, deal with it, friend. Cooperate or head for the lee rail.
Sitting is sort of essential on my boat regardless.....but I use a DELO oil jug for that anyway.
 
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