SailNet Community banner

421 - 440 of 443 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
I'm guessing that on the occasional visits by the opposite sex, they will never reach in and touch a lid with (SURPRISE!) poop underneath, moss or no moss.:) A lid does make a lot of sense because it is probably better at sealing out critters. I can see where there might be a "caking" problem if any part of the stirrer is directly in the line of fire. In the commercial units, the stir mechanism looks like it swings out of the way, shaped like a C. I guess the idea is to just aerate a bit, not try to macerate it.
One can make a simple stainless hook with a handle on it, for lifting the lid out, set near the head..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Just wanted to say that I just put a C-head in my new (to me) 36' sloop.

It's awesome! On a three week trip from Virginia to Ma. it worked perfectly. Yes it does have an "earthy" smell from the peat moss but that's it. Beats that old nasty head smell and no more having to deal with holding tanks/hoses/pump out boats etc. So easy to use even a cave man could do it. :)

Brian
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
There is just a little bit of coir in the bucket. When the loop is down it does get covered, out of the firing line. It seems that if the loop is left down and turned slowly 4 times clockwise, 4 counterclockwise, it gives plenty of stir to do a good mix/aeration. The normal level of peat/coir will be higher. The handle is rugged. made the axle from an old pc. of 1" shaft, 3/8" hole drilled through with two 5'16" set screws on a flat ground in the shaft. The spokes are just 5/16" bolts. There's a piece of screen inside the vent tube so critters can't get in that way. I do have the lid with a screw in the top to grab hold of but it will not snap on with the trough in the way. Will try this bucket arrangement but there is room to build in a much larger fiberglass base up along the curvature of the hull. The whole frame could easily be hinged to lift up for access. The bucket should be kinda handy though if it works well enough because when full, the cap can just be snapped on, vent hole plugged, and a new bucket cycled in.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Brent Swain

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Boat is on the hard now so have not put into action yet. This fall will post on how it works out.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Just tested a little 1.8w, $25 solar panel with the computer fan. It seems to work great. Am going to connect this to a small 12v wet cell battery to keep the head vent completely separate from the house battery bank. This way I will have 0 additional amperage draw due to this project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
We installed a C-Head in our homemade boat last year, despite feminine misgivings as to esthetics, technique learning curve, and waste-handling workload, but we barged ahead, because dealing with holding tanks, pumputs, stuck valves, permeated hoses, pumpout logs and discharge locks seemed far worse.
Long story short, we are delighted.
-There is NO odor.
-We have had no fly infestations so far, only place in this swamp with no bugs is our head.
-Cleaning and maintenance is very quick and easy. Transferring solid waste is quick and easy. No disassembly necessary.
- The five-gallon secondary solid waste bin holds a lot more than a holding tank would have, months worth at our current rate of usage, and if it fills, we have a spare 5-gallon bucket-and-snap-on lid here somewhere. Try THAT with a full holding tank, miles from the nearest working pump out station.
-Parts for this brand are, for the most part, available at our small-town hardware store. We changed our minds about the toilet seat, and replaced ours for <$15.
-The cabinet is compact, with a narrow footprint, sits flush against the bulkhead, and is no taller than a household toilet. The churn crank needs no space to the side. Very efficient use of space, and comfortable to sit on.
-Need another urine container? At least for this brand, here's another empty water/milk jug. Easy! Cheap! Readily to hand. Unobtrusive to empty, light-weight. No worries about middle-of-the-night overfill. Capping the jug, tucking it in a totebag, and pouring it in the next marina toilet is easy, neat, and at least as environmentally sound as any alternative. For that matter, urine is sterile. If some should accidentally be spilled overboard in open water, :rolleyes: I wouldn't be horrified. Not that I would do such an illegal thing.
-Our male guests, so far, seem cool with the "EVERYbody sits to pee" rule. Anybody who finds that requirement an affront to his masculine identity can (perfectly legally) head for the lee rail.

So, it is not a flush-and-forget-it solution like our home toilet, but no boat head is. This, so far, seems like a very reasonable solution to what appears to be a vexing problem to most boaters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
Two weeks ago I installed the C-head in a boat I am restoring on the hard. I have been using it and am really pleased with it. Installation is simple... I just put it on the flat surface in the head and lashed it in place. I am not going to vent it unless there is a bit of smell.

I charged it with peat moss and a cup of diatomaceous earth I bought at WalMart. Diatomaceous earth will kill any insect larvae.

But to be honest I'm not sure insects would even find it. The head (the room and not the device ) has that post-go fragrance for a few minutes after use but it goes away just a few minutes after stirring. Pee container can't be smelled either.

I haven't emptied it since I commissioned it. I will keep using it until it is full to see if there is any smell at any point in the fill cycle.

Thanks for the testimonials of the users here. Your experiences convinced me that the C-head was the way to go. Amazingly simple...no salt water supply/no toilet discharge line to holding tank/no holding tank/no holding tank discharge line/no macerator pump/no three way valve/no in-port and at sea discharge penetrations and valves (one above and one below the water line)/no spare parts bin for toilet and valves/no valve maintenance/no troubleshooting when things don't go right/no searching for pump out facility/no $$$ for pump outs/no violating the law when no pump out can be found. And no smell (although to be honest my boat has never had a head smell).

Eliminating all that peripheral plumbing equipment makes a lot of space available for stowage on my small boat.
IMG_2769.jpg
 

·
Closet Powerboater
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Diatomaceous earth will kill any insect larvae.
You're right! What a great idea! I've been using premethrin insect spray (which works) thinking that since they soak infant malaria nets in the stuff that it should be nice and non-toxic. Well it turn out that its REALLY toxic to cats. Since I have a ship's cat, I need an alternative. Besides it smells. I've heard of using diatomaveous earth in gardening and other applications but for the composting head this sounds like pure genius!

Diatomaceous earth plus coconut coir is hopefully the perfect recipe.

Medsailor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
Medsailor...I can't take credit for that. Sandy of C-heads recommends using diatomaceous earth in his video describing his products and how to use them. I thought it was genius too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,161 Posts
I've had a C-head in my motor home for a few months now, as a test run for installing it in the boat I'm building.

My only question at this point is, "do I yank my motor home's C-Head for the boat, and reinstall the water-flushing toilet it replaced -- or leave it there, bite the bullet and buy another one for the boat?


The answer should be pretty simple. But I'm a cheapskate, and 500 bucks is 500 bucks.....
 

·
&#9608;&#9608;&#9619;&#9619;&#9618;&#9618;&#9617;&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
That's an "Incinolet".

Be still my heart.

Aside from needing, yes, a freaking lot of power for the long burn cycle, and the somewhat delicate concern of "I'm about to place my bare ass IN a furnace and hang out for a while..."

Oh, and you drop in a paper liner something like a coffee filter before each use/cycle.

Around two grand and needing 2000 watts for 45? minutes. If you can afford 2kwh out of your power every time you flush, no pun intended, wouldn't that be a nice way to go?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,161 Posts
We bought a C-Head after a couple of poo showers due to a clogging vent. I guess you could say that we'd had enough of that sh!t.
My wife wrote up the whole deal on our blog if you want to read it. I still can't believe that C-Head linked to it as a review. :)
It's here- Day 10: The **** Diaries, Golden Showers and **** » Landfall Voyages
Tks for the link. It's a good write-up, and it agrees with my personal experience using the C-Head.

The biggest knock I've had on mine is people carrying on about the fact that it has to be emptied more often than the Nature's Head or Air Head. But c'mon, folks.... emptying a C-Head is about as hard as taking out the kitchen trash. Even easier actually, because you don't have to stick a new bag in it afterwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
The Humanure Handbook is still available for download by chapters in pdf format:

Look for table of contents.

One thing that hasn't been touched on in this discussion is aerobic purification and decomposition of human waste, such as is used in municipal treatment plants where treatment has to proceed at a brisk pace through the use of sprayers or waterfalls. Composting tends to depend on this similar process to kill pathogens without the liquid environment through the use of dry bulking agents to maintain oxygen levels. One of the advantages of the C-head is the storage of batches for further decomposition without the addition of fresh material. Unfortunately, the exclusion of air by sealing the container stops the aerobic purification process just as not turning a compost pile slows the decomposition and purification process. In a larger composting system the compost is withdrawn from the bottom of the chamber, where the decomposition process has been completed. However since it is an actively used system, there is still potential for contamination; thus the warnings and concerns about handling composted human waste. There is a report put out by the EPA that charts the life of the various pathogens found in human waste products when exposed to various environments.
Search this since I can't post links:

water.epa.gov/aboutow/owm/upload/2005_07_14_comp.pdf

Also, very little is said about municipal treatment plants that empty their effluent into our waterways and oceans, especially when these systems are overloaded by storm sewer runoff. Contrary to common beliefs, most cities (especially large older coastal cities) still have not completed the federally mandated process of separating storm water from sewage lines. So when you take your boat to the pumpout station today, it doesn't mean your waste is being handled properly. What it means is that you will likely be drinking it tomorrow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I should add that sunlight is also a great purifier, as well. So when you dump your compost out of your bucket you could be doing our environment a favor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
For those people with troubled holding tank systems, the addition of air into the holding tank has been recommended to reduce odors. Most recommendations center around larger and shorter ventilation hoses.
 

·
Aspiring to be a Mexican
Joined
·
543 Posts
The Humanure Handbook is still available for download by chapters in pdf format:

Look for table of contents.

One thing that hasn't been touched on in this discussion is aerobic purification and decomposition of human waste, such as is used in municipal treatment plants where treatment has to proceed at a brisk pace through the use of sprayers or waterfalls. Composting tends to depend on this similar process to kill pathogens without the liquid environment through the use of dry bulking agents to maintain oxygen levels. One of the advantages of the C-head is the storage of batches for further decomposition without the addition of fresh material. Unfortunately, the exclusion of air by sealing the container stops the aerobic purification process just as not turning a compost pile slows the decomposition and purification process. In a larger composting system the compost is withdrawn from the bottom of the chamber, where the decomposition process has been completed. However since it is an actively used system, there is still potential for contamination; thus the warnings and concerns about handling composted human waste. There is a report put out by the EPA that charts the life of the various pathogens found in human waste products when exposed to various environments.

water.epa.gov/aboutow/owm/upload/2005_07_14_comp.pdf

Since I can't post links you have to add http, etc. at the beginning to complete the preceding url.

Also, very little is said about municipal treatment plants that empty their effluent into our waterways and oceans, especially when these systems are overloaded by storm sewer runoff. Contrary to common beliefs, most cities (especially large older coastal cities) still have not completed the federally mandated process of separating storm water from sewage lines. So when you take your boat to the pumpout station today, it doesn't mean your waste is being handled properly. What it means is that you will likely be drinking it tomorrow!
My C-Head came with a venting system for the secondary storage container.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Sorry. You're right. There is the vent system that comes with the system. I just remembered the comments about storing the full container with a sealed lid...
 
421 - 440 of 443 Posts
Top