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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 1979 Islander 28. The comression post has sank / crushed into the floor.It has dorped a little over a half an inch. I was thinking of letting the turnbuckles out to realease tension, then jack up the compression post.Shimming it up with aluminum plate or fiberglass.
Is this a Dumb idea? I Would appreciate any advise, or info.
 

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Sailho,

Do you know why it compressed? Was it the floor that failed and pushed downwards, is there a visible deformation of the hull under the water at that zone?

Or was it the post that shrank with the weight.

Absolutely yes, do repair with a shimming piece, but if you can, make a new compression post. I assume it's wood correct? Just make sure the shims are correctly secured and attached eithr to the post or the hull, so they don't come off as you sail and drop the mast all of a sudden which will cause a failure.
 

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Compression Post - Cabin Sole issue

I have a 1979 i28. We are almost complete with that and additional structural repairs.

The Compression post may shrink a bit, ours was about a 1/16" to 3/32 shorter than the bulkhead it is attached to. The real problem is too much load on an improper material, i.e. the 3/4" plywood cabin sole.

On our boat the post loads down on top of the plywood cabin sole and crushes it, we had a bit more than 3/8" squeezed out of the sole and a slight deformation on the tops of the floors the sole rides on. I believe it totaled about 1/2" "crushed out".

On the i28 I race on, they had installed a plate as a repair. When they adjust backstay tension they still pull until the head door almost jams...

First off, how about a more details regarding your boat, like do you have a teak cabin sole or just the plywood and carpet...?

Paul Comte
i28
Milwaukee WI
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply

Sailho,

Do you know why it compressed? Was it the floor that failed and pushed downwards, is there a visible deformation of the hull under the water at that zone?

Or was it the post that shrank with the weight.

Absolutely yes, do repair with a shimming piece, but if you can, make a new compression post. I assume it's wood correct? Just make sure the shims are correctly secured and attached eithr to the post or the hull, so they don't come off as you sail and drop the mast all of a sudden which will cause a failure.
GIULIETTA,

Yeah it looks like the plywood sole was softer than the compression post, and it "crushed" into the sole. There is no sign of rot at all. As far as the make up of the compression post... it's a two piece. The top half looks to be made of steel, the bottom half is wood.
I can't get the jack directly centered under the mast, but what I plan to do is loosen the turn buckles a little at a time and jack up the post / mast, and shim it with some aluminum plate. (I will take your advise and secure the shim, thanks). I think it is a feasable plan. We do not have crane service or drydock facilities yet, so I'm trying to address the issue in the water.
Your reply is very much appreciated, if you think of anything else let me know.

Thanks, Sailho
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a 1979 i28. We are almost complete with that and additional structural repairs.

The Compression post may shrink a bit, ours was about a 1/16" to 3/32 shorter than the bulkhead it is attached to. The real problem is too much load on an improper material, i.e. the 3/4" plywood cabin sole.

On our boat the post loads down on top of the plywood cabin sole and crushes it, we had a bit more than 3/8" squeezed out of the sole and a slight deformation on the tops of the floors the sole rides on. I believe it totaled about 1/2" "crushed out".

On the i28 I race on, they had installed a plate as a repair. When they adjust backstay tension they still pull until the head door almost jams...

First off, how about a more details regarding your boat, like do you have a teak cabin sole or just the plywood and carpet...?

Paul Comte
i28
Milwaukee WI
Thanks for the reply Phil. My boat is a 11979 I28 as well. The sole is plywood, and the problem is identical to what you described. We do not have crane or dry dock service back yet so I'm trying to address this issue in the water. I can't get the jack directly centered under the mast, but I think it will be ok.
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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We had a '78 Islander with the same problem. I loosened all the turn buckles and got a jack in there. I put the jack across one of the stringers a little further aft and then I got in there with a sawz-all and cut out the compressed plywood floor. I cut the flooring away about half the width around the two adjacent stringers then I took a two inch thick piece of maple plank I had and cut that down to size to it would slide in under the compression post with the two plank ends carved down so it would rest on the stringers then epoxied the whole thing in. I sold the boat a while later, so I don't know how well the repair held up over time, but it did the trick in the short run.
 

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Buying Islander 28 With Similar Issues

I am close to purchasing a 1978 Islander 28 which I think has some related issues. My surveyor found rotting plywood in the bilge at the lower end of the baffles that becomes structure for the floor and one which the mast compression post bears on. My surveyor thought it wasn't super major b/c there was plenty of solid wood where it was needed, but thought it needs to be fixed. The owner offered to make it right and cut out the rotting portion of the plywood and glass in new. I also noticed where the metal compression post has deflected the wood trim it bears on before tranfering its load to the compression post in the head.

Have any insights or thoughts? How concerned should I be with this? Is this a bigger issue than just replacing rotting plywood? Is it likely that the cabin sole is crushed under the post as well - indicated by the deflection?

Thanks!

Alan
 

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Handsome devil
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Alan:

Its always wise to remove any and all compromised wood when doing any repair if you can...sometimes it isn't critical if it is not structural ( usually if plywood is in a fiberglass boat it is for structural/stiffening reasons) and other means then can be used as a quick fix temporary fix..but if you take the effort and time to replace it you will feel better about it and so will the future surveyor and buyer.

As far as how big of a job it is ..that's hard to say depending on your boats configuration...the actual repair is usually way easier then the tearing apart and reassembling of everything to get at it.
 

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Thanks for your reply. We are getting all the bad wood out and replacing with new. As far as I can see.... it might be better than when it was new. Seemed to be a small design flaw or manufacter overlook. The plywood ribs dipped into the bildge and the bottom end grain was exposed to bilge water and allowed water to seep into the wood.

Again, thanks for you insights!
 

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Compression post issue Islander 28

I totally agree with Stillraining. Forget shims, cut out the failed plywood and replace with new wood. I used a short maple plank from an offcuts bin at Rocklers, about $5. On my 1978 I28 I found no rot in the plywood under the compression post but it had distorted badly. Maybe the plywood got wet a few times, maybe the wood wasn't strong enough to begin with and maybe the fact that the foot of the compression post does not sit wholly on the bearer beam contributed. Two cautionary notes: (a) don't jack up the mast too much or you could break the fibreglass tabs holding the bulkhead to the hull and (b) if you're replacing, not shimming, make sure you have some very very solid temporary mast supports - you don't want them giving way! Do not rely on one upright timber balanced on a bottlejack, that would be asking for trouble. I used 6"x2" timbers from Home Depot.
 

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My first boat was an I28…a fine boat but it had the same problem. It can be fixed permanently but it takes a little work and a few bucks.

I didn't do the work myself, but this is what was done (wish I had taken pictures):

The mast was removed to take all weight off the compression posts. The posts were removed (unfortunately had to remove some of the head bulkhead). Foam filler was epoxied into the bilge between the two stringers fore and aft of where the compression posts were, and glassed over. A section of mast (from a broken mast off another boat) was measured and aluminum plates welded to each end of the new "mast compression post." Wiring for VHF and mast lights were installed inside. Finally, the new compression post was bolted into the glassed section between the stringers. A mast plate was placed on the top of the deck, through-bolted and sealed. Then the original mast was replaced, rig tuned, and everything worked perfectly. I never had any more problems.

Some of you handier types could probably do the work and save some money. Good luck.
 

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I know this is an old post, but here is my story, and the solution I used. When I bought my I-28 I looked it over pretty close and the major flaw I saw was under the sole where the compression post sat. The floor was OK but under it in the bilge was a mess of rotted out plywood.

I was fairly new to boating and everything I had read advised to get a survey before buying. So I called one of the more respected surveyors in the area to look at my prospestive purchase. He came out and looked the boat over (it was in a cradle on land) and about 20 minutes he came out and only noted a few flaws-hose not double clamped -possible blister-crack in the keel joint, BUT NOTHING about the rotted out mast step!! Before he got off the boat I asked him if he had noticed any problems in the bilge, so he went back inside to look. And lo and behold he SAW the problem! He had never lifted the floor boards to inspect the bilge on his initial inspection. Well my confidence in him and other suveyors certainly went down alot.

About 2 weeks later he sent me an adder to his bill ( which I didn't pay) and an elaborate drawing of framing, epoxy and fiberglass to fix the problem. I think if I had a boatyard do this repair it would have been several thousand dollars.

Well. I didn't have that kind of money, so I remembered the KISS principle. Whats been around for thousands of years. doesn't rot, is easy to work with. and is cheap?? CONCRETE!

I bought a sack of concrete, formed it up with some scrap plywood, and 15 years later it still looked like the day I put it in, and the mast had not moved one iota!!
 

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Damned clever, that! It's heavy but low in the boat so it doesn't affect stability. In addition to being rot proof it forms to fit the bottom and spreads the load, too. Did you put in a tube or anything while it was wet so bilge water can move? The only caution I can think of is to make sure it is absolutely dry when the weather freezes.
 

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Yup- I put 3/4 PVC in the bottom and another one higher for wires etc. The concrete was less than 1 square foot and solved the problem. Plus I think the boat was faster after, but maybe it was just my imagination.
 

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Switch to an all metal pole, and stainless floor. Wood ( dead vegitation ) has no place in the bilge of a fibreglass boat.
 

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There have been quite a few discussions about this issue over the years and searching back in various fora might help. The original design by Bob Perry had a keel-stepped mast so the fault lies with Islander for changing the design during production to create a more open interior to sell boats. I'm inclined to think that most Islander 28s will have this problem which on my boat occurred not only on the cabin sole but also where the metal post sat on the horizontal countertop. The problem is plywood under compression loading perpendicular instead of parallel to the grain. Although the early Islanders were constructed with extremely high quality Bruynzeel plywood, the production Islander simply asked too much of the materials. I jacked mine up with the mast in place and found the process nerve-wracking (expect creaks and groans) but possible. I had to make up about an inch so I replaced the plywood in both locations with stacked 1/4" aluminum plates, one spanning the two cross beams in the bilge and the other a disk between the steel and wooden post at countertop height. I was rightfully reminded to insert a dielectric material between the dissimilar metals on another forum. If I had it to do over again, I would: 1) take the mast down first and, 2) strongly consider giving up the off-center kludge of posts and do what Bob Perry seems to have envisioned. Give up the space and squeeze by a single post centered on the keel. However, this requires advanced boatwright skills and slim and agile sailing companions and for those of us more interested in sailing rather than fixing boats there is always the option of simply ignoring the problem because I don't view it as a critical safety item for the casual sailor. Then again, I am risk-tolerant and I firmly believe that the next meteorite to strike the planet will not hit me. Others may disagree....
 
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