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Believe they were built in Asia for a Dutch (?) outfit. Gary Mull did the 40 footer, if I remember correctly, which has a reasonably quick PHRF rating for a boat of that vintage. (Also see Pearson 37 for similar performance.) The Kalik 40 has very nice lines, but the one I saw (a while back, to be sure) had teak decks, and the attendant leaks. This can be a major headache.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I''ve heard this as well. Originally manufactured in Belgium as Kalik, later moved to Korea (?) as Concept. Gary Mull designer.

Anyone know how to find out more? Perhaps, even locate a copy of brochure or how to find out more about Gary Mull?

I''ve searched the web with little result. Any help would be great!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi there,

some time ago I looked at a Kalik 40 for sale here in the SF Bay area. Also couldn''t find out much info about it. A quick checkout did turn up similar problems as mentioned in the other post: leaky teak decks, springy sections especially around the cockpit, as well as forward of the chainplates.

Overall I liked the looks of the boat, but thought that the build quality wasn''t great.

Have you tried talking to the broker/owner about info? They should have at least some.

Enjoy... Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the feedback.

While the boat does have teak decks there is no leaking. Boat also appears to be build very solidly, no flexing. In fact, it appears to be very solid.

I''ve spoken to the broker, but he didn''t have much more than what''s been stated above.

There are a few Concept 40s around locally, all appear in great shape. Haven''t seen a Kalik yet. Perhaps quality improved.

Thanks again,

Jeff
 

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Hi, I've have a 1982 Concept 40. Boat very solidly built as 2 surveyors have attested ("brick __house", etc.) I replaced all deck hardware which was very marginal to begin with. Sails extraordinarily well. Have also replaced original teak decks with faux teak. And replaced Pathfinder diesel which was problematic. Classic good looks and interior. Currently for sale.

Jim in Ventura
 

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Hi, I've have a 1982 Concept 40. Boat very solidly built as 2 surveyors have attested ("brick __house", etc.) I replaced all deck hardware which was very marginal to begin with. Sails extraordinarily well. Have also replaced original teak decks with faux teak. And replaced Pathfinder diesel which was problematic. Classic good looks and interior. Currently for sale.

Jim in Ventura
 

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Hi I was reading your comments on changing the pathfinder. I have a Kalik 40 and have to change the engine. I was wondering if you got the engine out through the stairs or cut a hole in the cockpit.
Thanks for any help.
The Kalik/Concept 40s are great boats. Gary Mull was a great designer. By and large the build quality appeared to be very good on the couple that I've been on.

While I cannot give you an answer that is specific to removing the engine from the Kalik, I have helped remove several engines from boats and have moved the engine out of my boat into the cabin and then back back into the engine bay.

Here are some tips. I was able to build a pair of gantries across the boat that gave me places to rig tackles and move the engine around. I was also able to add beam along side of either side of the engine that allowed me to pick up the legs of the engine and engine mounts off the beds. On the Kalik the gantries would be a beam over the companionway and a beam between the galley and the counter on the head.

On the engines that we pulled out of the boats, we took a lot of measurements beforehand and made a cardboard and scrap plywood mock-up for the one engine that we feared could not fit through the companionway. Those measurements showed (and measurements suggested that I would have to do the same to get my engine through the companionway) that to get the engines out of the boat through the companionway we needed to remove all of the ancillary components that we could to reduce the height and width of the engine (in other words remove the starter, alternator, oil filter and bracket, heat exchanger, air cleaner, and water pumps and so on).. On the one engine that we originally thought would not fit at all,, we removed all of that plus the valve cover, transmission, and oil pan. That engine went out nearly vertical and the transmission would have hit the fixed portion of the countertop and top step of the companionway. The other engine went out on a diagonal and tilted slightly to one side.

It obviously helps if you are in a boatyard with a crane that can lift the engine out of the companionway, but even with a crane, it pays to have multiple attachment points on the engine with small block and tackles rigged to each that allow you to tilt the engine front to back and side to side. to align with the opening, On the one that went out vertical, we had to slowly drop the back as the engine went through the companionway to make that work.

When I did my engine, I unscrewed the cabin sole in that area and removed it (not all boats can do that) to protect it I put down plastic over the interior, and plywood over the plastic to create a 'dirty' work area. Even though I had drained the oil and water systems before removing the engine from the engine bay, it was amazing how much more ended up draining out as I tilted the engine moving it into the cabin, and then pulling the transmission and replacing the seals.

Good luck,
Jeff
 
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