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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I'm new to the forum and sailing but, I have many years at sea on ships and boats of all sizes in the Navy. I'm searching for a live aboard to do some long distance cruising. Two boats high on my list, at the moment, are a Gozzard 44 and a Gozzard 37. I'm interested to hear from prior owners and experiences with these boats (especially how they handle under sail (balance/heave-to), maintenance, long-term comfort, etc.) and anything I should be paying particular attention to when looking at these vessels. I'm planning to single hand and I would like to be as self sustaining as possible, i.e. make water, recharge batteries without a generator or engine.

Thanks
 

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New or used?

I have never sailed one but I have oggled them at the boat show. They are one of the few new boats I would consider, had I MUCH deeper pockets.
 

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Hey code, we are old sailors that have been owners of 5 different boats over 45+ years. Boat 3 was a Bayfield 36 (read about Bayfield/Gozzard history). The Bayfield was full keel and beamy and all that implies. Would track like no body's business, but was not a fast boat. Would reach off nicely, but not point so well. Was comfortable in a seaway, and roomy to live on for its size. We sailed NE from Cape Cod to Canada with her, enjoyed her very much. Cutter rig was nice in a blow, this one was rigged with the staysail on a furler, cake to reduce sail and balance. Sprit was nice platform for an anchor. Depending on your esthetics, pleasing to the eye. Wouldn't buy one for Wednesday night beer can races. Think about your intended use, and good luck with your purchase. Sailboat purchases are a balance between form and function. Make sure you are please with both these factors.
 

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I didn't realize Gozzard was still making new boats. I just looked at their website, picked a random model (G41RC) and saw a few strange things. They claim a half-load displacement of 23,500lbs which seems kind of light given the type of boat, but probably believable. However, they say that their 59' air draft mast is carrying 1341sf of sail area. We have a 63' mast with no backstay to interfere with roach and only carry 1270sf. They have a 65hp diesel with 88gal of fuel, yet claim 958nm range motoring range.

I used to want a Gozzard, and do believe they are built well, but they are no longer my type of boat. My advice for cruising is get a boat with less wood to maintain, and one that performs and handles better. Honestly, for most monohull cruising, it is hard to beat the Hunter/Beneteau type of boats.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks cape. That's the kind of information I'm looking for. The styling is definitely to my taste. I love those classic lines and I think the interior layout is a brilliant use of space. I have definitely checked out the Bayfield/Gozzard history. Very interesting. As for sail handling, I appreciate your feedback, it should be even better with their later hull designs.

Hi cole, I hear you on the maintenance but, I comfortable with the amount of brightwork on the later Gozzards. The tankage can really vary based on what the original owner ordered. I've seen numbers all over the place.
 

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Gozzards are beautiful and well-made boats. I was on one at a boat show 15 or so years ago, and I still remember the pride the Gozzard guys had in what they created. They enthusiastically showed me all of the little (and big) innovations they had crammed into the boat (it was the 31 or the 37). First class joinery. This particular boat had a bunch of extras too, like stainless dolphins at the caprail break. Fancy. I've never sailed on one, but you can estimate it's performance based on the hull form and sail area.

If you like that kind of vibe, you might want to check out the Island Packets too. Traditional styling, but a little more practical: no clipper bows, and little woodwork above decks. Many models have swim platforms. Bullet-proof rack and pinion steering. And below, the joinery and workmanship is the equal of Gozzard. And if it's that "dinette-in-the-v berth" use of space below that you like (and I agree!), then look for an IP Estero. I don't think they're making them anymore, but the Estero is basically the IP 37 hull with the (to me) more practical interior that is very much like the Gozzard's. Neither the Gozzard or the IP is going to win many races, but they are both stable, forgiving and comfortable long-range cruisers.
 

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Code, I used to know some folks that had a Gozzard 36. The last I saw them they were still relatively new to the boat but were pleasantly surprised at how comfortable she was and well she handled snotty conditions. Not the fastest boat, but probably a good choice for your plans. Beautiful boats...
 

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Did my yachmasters on a Gozzard 37 and was very pleased with the performance. She was easy to handle in tight areas. Very spacious with that type of design. Gotta love those cutter rigged sloop with a bowsprit.
 
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